3 U.S. Mint Error Coin Lists: Rare Mint Error Coins + Common Mint Error Coins You Can Find In Pocket Change + Mint Mistakes By Denomination

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Have you ever heard about Mint error coins?

Simply put, they are error coins that are Mint-made mistakes. Sometimes coin mistakes manage to escape the presses, and when they do they become collectible items!

Compare this to post-Mint errors — which are coins that were altered after leaving the U.S. Mint facility, and they’re not worth as much.

With an error coin, some time during the process of creating the coin at the U.S. Mint, a mistake was made affecting the “look” of the coin.

This is one of the 50 state quarters -- the South Dakota quarter. This error quarter is missing the extra layer of silver!

There are many types of coin mistakes. 

Today, I’m going to share with you 3 different Mint error coin lists that you’ll want to save and refer to often:

  1. The most common Mint error coins that are relatively easy to find
  2. Rare Mint error coins that are more difficult to find
  3. Mint error coins by denomination

The most exciting thing about common Mint error coins is that they can often be found in circulation! (That’s right… so start looking through your spare change for these coin mistakes.)

And the most exciting thing about rare Mint error coins is their value! They are often worth hundreds — even thousands — of dollars.

So yeah, I definitely think that coin errors are fun to collect!

Common Mint Error Coin List

Several types of common Mint error coins are pictured here.

Error coins as a category are usually divided by the type of error — of which there are several.

Keep in mind, the following list of common Mint error coins is by no means exhaustive. There are literally dozens of recognized errors. The ones mentioned here are major error types and are discussed here to help introduce you to the larger realm of error coin collecting.

These are some of the relatively common error coins that you could actually find in pocket change:

#1 – Doubled Die Coins

doubled die penny

Doubled dies are one of the most popular types of coin errors. A doubled die refers to the doubling of all or part of the image on a coin. Typically, the doubling is confined to one side of a coin, and it is normally best seen in the lettering of a coin. However, parts of the design image can also show doubling effects, if the doubling is prominent enough. One of the most famous coin mistakes of all time is the 1955 doubled-die penny — worth around $1,100 in well-worn condition, it’s been drawing mainstream attention for over 50 years! Generally speaking however, most doubled dies are worth $20 to $50 and up.

RELATED: Doubled Dies: See How Much They’re Worth

#2 – Blank Planchets

A blank planchet is the same as a blank coin - a relatively common Mint error coin.

Blank planchets are common Mint error coins that are not hard to spot! A planchet is the round piece of metal that a coin is made from. A blank planchet error coin is simply a blank piece of metal that is the same size, shape, and color as a typical coin. It has no markings on it — no heads or tails design at all. Some blank planchets are worth only a few dollars, but many are worth between $10 to $20.

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Coin Roll Hunting Tips: How To Search Through Rolls Of Coins + Coins You Should Look For

RELATED: Blank Planchets: See How Much They’re Worth

#3 – Broadstrikes

Example of a broadstruck coin

When coins are struck at the U.S. Mint, they are momentarily placed inside a collar during the striking process to help create a properly formed rim. When the coin is not inserted inside the collar, the coin will tend to spread out a bit upon being struck. The result is a coin with an odd-looking rim (or no rim at all), and the design may be off-center. Broadstrike coins will also often be wider than they’re supposed to be. Depending on the type of coin, relative over-width of the coin, and the centering of the design, coins with broadstrike errors are worth anywhere from $5 to over $200.

RELATED: Broadstrike Coins: See How Much They’re Worth

#4 – Off-Center Coins

This nickel is a good example of an off-center coin.

Some off-center error coins are off by more than 50% — meaning only half the design has been struck on the coin. (The other half of the coin is typically blank.) With off-center coins, the values can escalate as more and more of the design is missing, with the optimal such error being about 50% off center with a full date showing on the coin. Prices vary widely, depending on the type of coin. Many are worth $50 and up, and several are worth well into the hundreds of dollars.

RELATED: Off-Center Coins: See How Much They’re Worth

#5 – Die Clash Coins

A 1920 Mercury dime die clash error coin.

Die clashes are struck from two coin dies clashing without a coin in between them — so they sometimes show odd shapes on the obverse (heads side) or reverse (tails side) designs. These shapes are actually some of the design elements from the opposing die being impressed upon the other. So, you’ll want to look for details from the reverse side of the coin on the obverse OR details from the obverse side of the coin on the reverse. Die clash coins vary in value — depending on the coin and the amount of detail visible. Even light die clashes are worth between $2 to $3.

RELATED: Die Clash Coins: See How Much They’re Worth

#6 – Repunched Mintmarks

Repunched Mintmark

Repunched mintmarks are common Mint error coins that look like they have a second mintmark underneath the date on pre-1990 coins. They happen when the letter punch leaves two impressions at different angles or slightly different locations. Usually, the two mint mark impressions are overlapping or touching in some way. Rarely, the mintmarks are in two separate, distinct locations. They’re worth between $3 and $15 — depending on how drastic the doubling (or even tripling) of the mintmark is.

RELATED: Repunched Mintmarks: See How Much They’re Worth

#7 – Die Breaks / Die Cracks

Example of a die crack error coin.

As coin dies age, they may begin cracking or breaking apart. When this happens, the area(s) of defect on the die will appear as raised bumps, lines, or even broad flattish areas. Larger die breaks (die cracks) or those that create interesting design elements are often worth a lot of money — like this one that was once worth as much as $500. However, most die cracks (or die breaks) are generally minor and of insignificant value; some can be worth $3 and up.

RELATED: Die Breaks & Die Cracks: See How Much They’re Worth

#8 – Die Cuds

This 1970 penny is a cud error coin

Die cuds are broad die breaks that are attached to the rim. Specifically… when a piece of the coin die breaks off from the rim, the result is a flat, featureless blob of metal that extends from the rim inward. Some cuds are relatively tiny, insignificant, and worth very little. Others are large, consuming much of the rim and perhaps half or more of one side of the coin. Larger die cuds can be worth $100 or more.

RELATED: Die Cuds: See How Much They’re Worth

#9 – BIE Errors

BIE Lincoln Penny

These are one of the most popular kinds of die breaks among all U.S. coins. A BIE error is a vertical die crack that looks like an “I” in between the “B” and the “E” in the word Liberty on a penny. They’re usually referred to as common Mint error coins — although some diehard coin collectors call them varieties. BIE pennies are worth between $3 and $5.

RELATED: BIE Errors: See How Much They’re Worth

#10 – Clipped Planchets

A clipped planchet error coin.

Clipped planchets are crescent-shaped error coins. The device which cuts the planchets out of the huge strips of metal that first enter the Mint sometimes cuts a planchet more than once. When this happens, it can cut away a portion of the planchet, resulting in various-sized crescents. Most clipped coins are worth between $5 and $100 — depending on the type of coin, grade, and amount of missing metal.

RELATED: Clipped Planchets: See How Much They’re Worth

In this video, I’m showing you closeups of 5 of types of common Mint error coins that you are most likely to find in your spare change:


Remember, the coin mistakes listed above are just a few of the many interesting and exciting types of error coins. There are many more types of U.S. Mint coin mistakes that exist!

Rare Mint Error Coin List

With regard to mint error coins that are rare and harder to find, these are a few of our articles about error coins that are not as likely to be found in your pocket change:

See our tips for finding rare coins in circulation.

Here are a few other scarce and rare mint error coins that are difficult to find:

Brockage Error Coins

A brockage error coin

If a coin gets stuck to a die after its struck and is subsequently impressed into other planchets that follow, a negative, or mirror image of the lodged coin is created on the following planchets. Brockage errors are particularly neat coins and rather scarce, too. Even modern-day brockage pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters are worth about $75 and up for full (not off-center or partial) brockages. Older brockage errors or those on larger denominations are worth significantly more.

Die Caps

Capped die error coin

Remember that brockage error? When that coin got stuck to the die and stamped out those brockage errors, the coin wedged into the die also became an error of its own called a capped die. As it continually was pressed onto other planchets, the lodged coin was pushed onto other coins, becoming a misshapen coin that roughly resembles a bottle cap. Die caps are amazing, relatively rare Mint error coins that are worth about $150 and up.

 

Cancelled Coins


When the United States Mint catches an error, it will mutilate the error coin in a process known as waffling. These waffled coins, which show major ridges and crevices running parallel to each other, are neat collectibles. Among this list of error coins, the waffled coins are among the latest type. They date back only to about 2003, when the U.S. Mint acquired the machinery to cancel errors. These pieces are worth around $20 and up.

 

Die Trials


U.S. Mint officials will test the strength of the die strike and other aspects of the striking process by feeding trial planchets through the press at different pressure settings and adjustments. Many of these die trial coins will exhibit very light design details or other abnormalities relating to strike pressure. Die trial errors are rare and can be worth $250 or more.

 

Double Denomination Error Coins

Example of a double denomination coin

When a coin that had already been struck by one pair of dies winds up back in the pressed and is struck by dies from another denomination, you get a so-called double denomination. One example of a double denomination might be a Roosevelt dime that ends up getting struck by Lincoln cent dies, or a Jefferson nickel that makes it way into the Washington quarter presses. Normally, the impression from the second strike is stronger than the first. Such errors are both rare and curious… How did the finished coin makes it way back into the presses? It’s possible, yes… But if that coin could talk, what would it say? Double denominations are among the most coveted rarities in this list of error coins. They are worth $250 and up.

Lamination Errors

Lamination error coin

Planchets that are missing some of their surface area due to dirt, grease, gas bubbles, or other maladies are called lamination errors. A lamination error may present a flake-like area of metal missing from the surface. Values depend on the size of the lamination error. While minor lamination errors may not be worth much at all, major laminations — especially those involving missing layers on clad coins — can be worth tons. Small lamination errors are worth $5 to $10. Major lamination errors are worth $25 to $50 or more.

Multiple Strikes

A multi-strike mint error coin

Sometimes, a coin will be struck multiple times on the press. This can result in that coin showing many impressions of the design. You might see two, three, or even more impressions of the design on the same coin. As you’ve learned, this is not the same as a doubled die, which is a variety caused in the die-making process, not the striking. Multiple strike errors are rare, and values depend on the coin and the number of strikes involved. Values for these coins are all over the map but usually start at around $50.

See current values for rare and common U.S. Mint error coins.

Mint Error Coin List – By Denomination

Here are some of our other articles that discuss U.S. Mint common and rare error coins by denomination:

Must read: The Ultimate U.S. Error Coins List By Denomination

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947 thoughts on “3 U.S. Mint Error Coin Lists: Rare Mint Error Coins + Common Mint Error Coins You Can Find In Pocket Change + Mint Mistakes By Denomination”

    • Steph,

      Your nickel is probably a filled die. Though interesting, there really isn’t much added monetary value. However, your best chance of making money from the coin should you decide to sell is to show the piece to error coin collectors — they will be most interested in buying the piece.

      Reply
  1. I was checking my coins today, and found a 2002 dime, which the last 2 is very hard to even see. I didn’t find anything in my guide (2011) about that year of any found, would it be called under-strikes? Just wondering if you’ve seen anything concerning that. I put another same year next to it, which actually was a bit worn looking, and definately different stamping, way more clear.

    Reply
  2. I was checking my coins today, and found a 2002 dime, which the last 2 is very hard to even see. I didn’t find anything in my guide (2011) about that year of any found, would it be called under-strikes? Just wondering if you’ve seen anything concerning that. I put another same year next to it, which actually was a bit worn looking, and definately different stamping, way more clear.

    Reply
    • Hi, Joanne —

      It sounds like a fairly typical situation where the dime was weakly struck or there was grease in die (the device that impresses a design onto a blank coin). I’ve seen many dimes and pennies that have weakness in the last digit of the date.

      While these types of coins are a bit of a curiosity, they really aren’t worth anything extra because of the weakness.

      Reply
    • Hi, Joanne —

      It sounds like a fairly typical situation where the dime was weakly struck or there was grease in die (the device that impresses a design onto a blank coin). I’ve seen many dimes and pennies that have weakness in the last digit of the date.

      While these types of coins are a bit of a curiosity, they really aren’t worth anything extra because of the weakness.

      Reply
  3. hi i have a 1847 usa one cent but there ia a mint error on the spelling. it says one cunt and theother side is the head wich is upside down. IS this cent any value. kind regards tom dunne

    Reply
    • Thomas,

      There’s been no reported error like that — it sounds like someone altered your 1847 cent, and that means it wouldn’t have much value in the numismatic market; I don’t know the grade of the coin, but an altered piece like that, in typical, well-worn grades might bring only a few dollars.

      Reply
    • Thomas,

      There’s been no reported error like that — it sounds like someone altered your 1847 cent, and that means it wouldn’t have much value in the numismatic market; I don’t know the grade of the coin, but an altered piece like that, in typical, well-worn grades might bring only a few dollars.

      Reply
  4. hi i have a 1847 usa one cent but there ia a mint error on the spelling. it says one cunt and theother side is the head wich is upside down. IS this cent any value. kind regards tom dunne

    Reply
  5. Josh, today I came across a 1951D penny that looked strange. It was only about 3/4 the thickness of a regular cent and the back was not stamped at all. Looking at the back side you can see a very slight indentation where Lincoln’s head appears. The rear has the raised ring around the outside edge. What should I do with this thing?

    Reply
  6. Josh, today I came across a 1951D penny that looked strange. It was only about 3/4 the thickness of a regular cent and the back was not stamped at all. Looking at the back side you can see a very slight indentation where Lincoln’s head appears. The rear has the raised ring around the outside edge. What should I do with this thing?

    Reply
    • Hi, Quijada —

      The “V” is supposed to be there; it’s a stylized way of writing the “U” in IN GOD WE TRUST. The value of your coin is around $25 to $30.

      Reply
  7. I have a 2010 dime that is smaller than a regular dime, and the edge is smooth copper like a penny.  Is this a real “error” that could be worth something?

    Reply
  8. I have a 1920 walker that has and odd color and only weights about 8.5 grams where the other walkers i have weight a little over 12 grams. I think it was struck on the wrong metal.It’s wore from years of use and i can’t see why anyone would counterfeit such a run of the mill coin. If anyone knows of others like this or anything about it please let me know. my email i   ndlist2003@gmail.com

    Reply
    • I’m afraid not, Nicole. These types of coins are common novelty pieces either altered from real coins or cast in a mold and are designed for winning bets (often as a joke) or as an interesting conversation piece.

      Reply
  9. have lincoln cent with one cent writing beckward and on to writing the correct way and also the  united states is wring beckard but only some of the letters like you can only see ted and sta can anyone tell me the value of this coin

    Reply
  10. i have a friend who has a wheat penny that says c*nt one it insteadof cent. she has had it a long time, is it a joke one?

    Reply
    • Hi, Maria –

      That piece is quite something to look at, but because it is damaged, it’s worth only face value.

      Reply
  11. I have a 1992 quarter (Deleware state series) that appears to be similar to the one pictured above the Face side is copper and the reverse side is silver in color, one layer appears to have been missing when the coin was struck, do you have any idea of the value?

    Reply
  12. i have a 1967 u.s half dollar with a detachabel collar on the outside of the coin. no idea what it’s for, thought it was a war medal. any help would be appreciated.

    Reply
  13. I have four wheat pennies and I wanted to no how much they could be worth, the years are between 1951-1957 and are in great condition.

    Reply
    • Hi, Rachelle, –

      Lincoln wheat cents are in general rather common, even though they aren’t found much in circulation anymore. Except for the 1955 doubled die cent (the date and lettering on the obverse side of this coin appears to have a secondary, ghost image), any worn Lincoln cents during the 1951 to 1957 era you mentioned are worth around 3 to 5 cents each. By the way, the 1955 doubled die cent is worth around $1,000 and up.

      Reply
  14. i have a penny one side is a 1951 with no mint mark and the otherside is a 1952 with a denver mint mark . is there any value in it .

    Reply
    • Hi, Aaron –

      What you have is a novelty coin, most likely used either as a sight gag for an illusionist or a piece made to “win” coin tosses. These don’t really have any numismatic value.

      Reply
    • Hi, Ed –

      A silver quarter would actually weigh more than a typical copper-nickel clad quarter, not less. You may have an aluminum replica or something of the sort, though by law a coin replica should say “copy” on it.

      Reply
  15. Hello. I found a Lincoln Memorial coin…it has his bio on one side than his picture on the other. Do you happen to know where this was from? Also, I have a 1980 penny and the one side is thicker than the other…thank you

    Reply
    • A half off-center dime is worth around $5 to $20, based largely on if the date is evident (worth more in that case).

      Reply
  16. HI I HAVE THIS COIN THAT WAS MADE IN 1942 THE FRONT HAS THE MERCURY WING HEAD LIKE THE DIME HOWEVER THE BACK HAS THE MONTICELLO FIVE CENTS MINT S . CAN’T FIND OUT ONLINE.
    Gwen

    Reply
    • Hi, Gwen –

      You seem to be describing a novelty coin; either it is two halves, one side consisting of a 1942 Mercury dime and the other an S-mint Jefferson nickel, soldered together, or the piece is a token made by an enterprising individual as a gag effect, perhaps for a magic trick.

      Reply
    • Hi, Eva –

      What you have is a type of novelty coin, and perhaps quite likely a piece intended as an illusion for a magician. Though a neat conversation piece, it was not originally made that way at the U.S. Mint and is not really worth more than a couple dollars.

      Thank you for your question!

      Reply
  17. I have a broadstruck quarter.I can’t tell the year,only the edge of it is visable.it has many cracks in it, its thinner& its wider than a normal quarter.PLEASE HELP.

    Reply
  18. I have a 2002 p dime that has raised edges on both sides of the coin, and the outside of the coin is smooth. Is this an anomaly, or just caused by wear? I have attached a photo with another dime to compare it to.

    Reply
    • Amanda,

      Usually, when a coin’s rim is extra high it is due to finning which is caused when a coin is struck with more pressure than usual.

      However, given the fact the edge of your coin is smooth, your coin may have suffered damage in either a clothes dryer or perhaps it received damage in a coin machine slot. Either way, though, the smoothness would have been caused by edge wear of some type.

      Reply
  19. I have a 1955 D/D not the strong one but still a D/D the interesting thing is the S in the word TRUST is an upside down #2 any ideas?

    Reply
  20. I have a 2005 Minnesota state quarter that looks like the one you have pictured on this site. The face has the “penny look” and the other side is regular. Is this worth anything? Thanks.

    Reply
    • Hi, Cheryl –

      The coloration of that quarter is due to both lighting conditions but also toning. Without seeing a photo of your coin, I can’t say for certain the cause of your quarter’s color, but I can say that many of the 50 States Quarters have been gold plated. Gold plated quarters have only nominal value above the face value of the coin for two reasons: coins that have been plated outside of the U.S. Mint are viewed as “altered” by numismatists, and also the amount of gold on plated coins is extremely small; in most cases, less than a dollar of gold is on a gold-plated coin.

      If your quarter has toned a golden color, it may have a small amount of value (maybe anywhere from 25 cents top $1 over face value) to some collectors who prefer toned coins.

      Thanks for your question!

      Reply
  21. I have a quarter I think that has a nickel stamp and a quarter stamp on both sides and is thinner without the ridges on sides I don’t no what category this is in

    Reply
  22. I have this 1999 Quarter and one the tails side its colored. But the ink is off my like a milimeter of the actual lettering. Its not a marker cause it wont come off and the lettering is perfect. Is it worth any money?

    Reply
    • Hi, Jaydar –

      Your coin was colored by a private individual or company; these pieces, though real coins, are considered novelty coins (“altered” according to many numismatists), and usually have the most value to a person collecting that said specific type of coin.

      Yours is worth around $1 to $2 in a typical novelty marketplace setting.

      Reply
  23. There is a ‘leaf’ growing on the 1 of 1958. I don’t know such error belong to what category and how value will it be. Any help Joshua? Thank you.

    Reply
    • Hello, Tim –

      Yes, this appears to be some type of die cud; values for these errors vary. However, I’d suggest your coin would likely be worth at least $15 to $20 if sold to a coin dealer.

      Reply
  24. HI MY NAME I S JERRY I HAVE 1997D PENNY THIS IS RED IN COLORE ALMOST BLOOD RED BUT THE DATE ALSO SAYS 1999 ALSO IS THIS A DOUBLE DENOMINATION COIN? MEDAL IS THE COLOR OF BLOOD RED AFTER IT HITS AIR AND 1999 THE DATE IS RIGHT UNDER 1997 UNDER CAMERA IT SHOWS BOTH DATES

    Reply
    • Hi, Jerry,

      It sounds like your 1997-D was altered in some way to include the 1999 date. While it is difficult to say what the coin is meant to commemorate, it was definitely altered by some private individual. The toning you mention also seems like it might have been induced by an intentional chemical interaction.

      Reply
  25. I found a Lincoln penny from 1980. But the “1” is missing from “1980.” How much would something like this be worth?

    Reply
    • Hi Elizabeth –

      It looks like this 1980 penny has been severely damaged. Such a coin is numismatically worth face value.

      Reply
  26. joshua
    hello and thank you for looking at my coin …i found this 2012 D penny in circulation the other day and i found it to be very interesting and was wondering what you could tell me about it .
    thank you

    Reply
    • Hello there, Mason!

      From what I can tell, it looks as though somebody scraped off the copper coating of your penny around the edge and the high surfaces, exposing its zinc core.

      Thank you for posting those great images so I could see exactly what’s going on!

      Reply
      • Your welcome…and thanks again for the information…its always fun to find something unusual in pocket change!!!

        Reply
  27. Hi I have a 1955 Denver Mint penny and the rim on the face side seems to be over bent while the obverse side has no rim at all. Also the rim is curving in and i can’t seem to find out what happened or what it is worth.
    please help, thanks Sam

    Reply
    • Hello, Jchoo –

      It’s a little hard to say for sure without seeing a photo of the coin. If you wouldn’t mind posting an image, I’m sure we’ll be able to figure it out what’s going on with your coin. Thank you for your question!

      Reply
  28. Hi,
    Sorry pictures are just above.
    Warning the picture bellow features a 2 cent shield nickel with a font error/alteration that may be described as explicit by some, and should there for not be viewed if you are would find yourself offended. This is a genuine inquiry, about a genuine coin, which to the best of my investigations can not be determined as an error, or as an alteration.

    I have 1867 shield 2 cent nickel, with a font error, and sounds similar to a wheat cent mentioned below where “CENTS” was struck with a “U” instead of an “E.. Though I am having a hard time deciding wether it was an alteration, or a strike/minting error.
    The right hand vertical line of the “U” is broken, about half way up, with a serif pointing in towards the centre of the U at the broken point.. Above this break, a line continues, but is not as well defined as below the strange serif. If you ignore the small line just mentioned, the character looks like a back-to-front “J”. The coin looks legitimate, with very little wear, except for the “We” in “God we Trust”, having lost almost all definition. The “U” character does, and at the same time does NOT, look like an alteration. If you look at this strange thin line above the break in the back to front J, that then makes it into a U, and compare it to another E on the coin, you can see that this could be the remnants of triangular shape that makes the top horizontal line on the E. However if you look at the bottom of the “U” it has distinctly defined curves that and E does not have. Above the “U” in the lower horizontal line of the “2”, and in the cup/field within the “U” a small vertical depression can be seen, as though that part of the strike was not formed, in both of those spots.

    The coin is is G – F, with the only sign of significant wear being the loss of the word “We” in the inscription in god we trust, and other characters, and bows loosing a small amount of definition.

    Reply
    • Hello, John –

      Thanks for providing the warning about the language on the coin. It looks like somebody intentionally manipulated the “E” in “CENTS,” as I can see with the gouge and the pushed-up/rearranged metal around the damage. The coin may has some numismatic value as even damaged 2 Cent pieces, given their age, are worth from $5 to $10. However, I’m not sure if a coin dealer would buy this piece and be able to sell it given the unfortunate obscenity on the coin.

      Thank you for your question!

      Reply
  29. How much would this be worth? The part of the coin that has the face, is actually slightly thinner then the blank part of the coin

    Reply
  30. I was wondering if there is any places that would give me a fair appraisal on my error coins. I have 3 freezer bags full of penny’s, nickels, dimes and quarters. Dated from 70-80s

    Reply
    • Hello, Peachtree –

      It’s almost impossible for such a coin to be made with modern minting techniques, so I think you may have an illusionist’s “trick” coin, but I can’t say for certain the origin of your piece without seeing an image.

      Thanks for your question!

      Reply
        • Hi Peachtree,

          Is there by a chance an image available? I’m trying to determine if this is a piece that is gouged out or not to turn the coin into an illusionist’s gaffe or if this could be a die adjustment strike, which may be worth from $20 to $40.

          Reply
  31. I have a 1902 silver dollar with U S A struck into the coin so the U S A is indented into the coin on both the front and back. What does that do to the value of the coin?

    Reply
    • Hi Jack,

      It sounds like based on the description of your coin that it was counterstamped, or altered, by somebody outside of the mint. The value of a 1902 dollar in typical condition is presently around $22; with the counterstamp, which is viewed as an alteration, the value is closer to $17.

      Thank you for your question!

      Reply
    • Hi Rafael,

      It’s likely that the missing digit didn’t strike up well either due to die weakness or a filled die issue. These are relatively common anomalies and usually worth little, if anything, over ordinary value.

      Thanks for your question!

      Reply
    • Hello Mike,

      It’s definitely an alteration; the swirl marks tell me that the Jefferson design was worn off, possibly with a sanding device.

      Thanks for your question and the great photos!

      Reply
  32. Hello, I have a penny that is stamped with the back over front and criscrossed overeach other on the back, it is off centered as well so I cannot tell the year all I can see is a 19 and a 6 . Any idea about this one? Any help would be great, thanks!

    Reply
    • Hello, Rachel –

      The best I can tell from the photo, it appears you have die brockage error, which are generally worth about $40 and up.

      Thanks for your question and the great accompanying photos!

      Reply
    • Hi, Lara –

      This 1858 Flying Eagle cent appears to have taken somewhat of a beating sometimes in its life. The bubble in the “NI” of “UNITED” is actually from a hold that was punched partially through the coin from the reverse side, and the lines across the obverse surface are actually heavy scratches. This is still an historic, pre-Civil War coin worthy of hanging onto, though!

      Reply
  33. I don’t currently have a picture of my coin as it in my sons room and he is sleeping. But I will describe it the best i can. It looks to be a 1969 (unsure of the nine as it is so close to the edge that all you can see is the top curve of the number) Roosevelt Dime. When you look at the coin face side up, looks normal, flip it over, the torch picture in upside down. I cannot for the life of me find any info on it. Any ideas ?? I will try to get a pic to help figure it out in the morning. Thanks in Advance.

    Reply
    • Hello, Angie –

      Without seeing a photo it’s hard to say for sure, but this sounds like what we call a “rotational” error, in which case both designs (“heads” and “tails”) face “up.” If it’s real, such a coin is worth $75+. However, beware that some magicians create coins just like this, and those are worth nothing in terms of coin collector value.

      A coin certification professional would have to inspect the coin in person to determine whether or not this coin is authentic. They would likely check for evidence of a seam around the edge or toward the rim of the coin (which is how two real faces of the coin would be adhered together, both facing the same direction).

      I hope this provides some guidance for you. Please let me know if you have any followup questions about tis or any other coins!

      Reply
  34. Hello Joshua,
    I have found this Flying Eagle One Cent years ago, I searched many sides and foundjust one with a coin like this. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_Eagle_cent but it is still different:
    Diameter is little more than 21 mm fully round, it is silver shiny (mayby nickel, made of material from the „Seated Liberty Half Dime“?). it is out of center about 2mm. also the striking problems are visible at the eagle tail and wings. Some usage abbressive is also there. A in America isn’t striked propper (hole in A is misseing).
    A few grey points on it and grey shades in text (front and back) and wreath (backside) maybe dirt or oxidation.

    Here my questions: is this a legal coin? What will be paid for it?

    Thanks for your help.
    Leo

    Reply
    • Hello, Leoparda —

      This Flying Eagle piece appears to be a private reproduction, and not a legal-tender coin. This may have some value (perhaps $1 to $2) to those who collect novelty pieces.

      Thank you for your question!

      Reply
  35. Hey Joshua, I tried to make a post awhile back, but no response. I hope I didn’t do this wrong, but will try again.
    This coin seems to be an error, but wanted someones idea of what this is and what it might be worth.
    Pat

    Reply
    • Hello, Patrick –

      I apologize for the delayed reply! Actually, I’ve personally seen a few Susan B. Anthony coins with similar markings, and upon my examination they were marks that the coins acquired after years of storage in vaults while sitting in mint bags. Susan B. Anthony dollars never circulated very well (as you might know) and spent more than 15 years in storage — by the millions. So while your specific coin may have markings that suggest otherwise (which is possible upon a hands-on examination), what I see is bag damage. I hope this answers your question, Patrick.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  36. I have a penny that is a 1997 but the “97” in 1997 is slightly faded away I don’t know if it’s a mint error or it’s just faded away. Can’t load a pic but it’s just a regular penny. What is it and if it is something what is I worth?

    Reply
  37. I found a planchet counterstrike with 1909 a only on front. And back has only VDB on the back. Is it worth anything. Or anywhere I can look?

    Reply
  38. hello joshua. I found a 1973 kennedy half dollar that i thought was a dime. It is almost perfectly stamped front and back. I just happened to look at it because it looked like it was cut wrong and to my surprise it was a kennedy half dollar. I cannot find anything online as to what value it maybe. Can you take a look at it and tell me where i might look to get a value? I have attached front and back pic of the coin next to another kennedy half dollar for comparison on size.

    Reply
    • Hi, Mike!

      You actually have tiny toy coins! There’s actually quite a following behind these coins in the “exonumia” world and are worth 50 cents to $1 each as collectibles. While they aren’t legal tender and they’re made by a private company, they are still neat works of art.

      Thanks for your question!
      Josh

      Reply
  39. Hey another Joshua! Feels good to be talking to another Joshua. Anyways I feel like I could be wasting your time with this but I have to ask. So my mother came across a 1988-1985 two headed nickel (One head on each side). Also the nickel on one side states” Liberty 1988″ and the other side states “Liberty 1985.” I am not sure if it is a rotational error as well since the head is faced up every time I flip the coin. This coin does not seem fake but if it is then I guess the person that made it did an excellent job. What do you think it is worth if it is real or fake?

    – Joshua De Leon

    Reply
    • Hello, Joshua!

      Yes, it’s always cool to talk to another Joshua, huh? (and, no, I’m not Joshing you there…). Anyway, your 1985/1988 nickel is actually a well-made “trick” coin that was made post mint. This is done by slicing off two obverse nickel surfaces and then soldering them together. Once that part of the process has been completed, the edge is then sanded smooth.

      I hope this helps!
      -Josh

      Reply
  40. My great grandmother handed down her collectors book with many errors one of them happens to be a around 60-75 percent off penny as I saw there were many of these I stated examining them one was a good condition and both sides had head neither bearing a date how much is this worth?

    Reply
  41. Hey Joshua,

    I recently found a very interesting coin in my collection, it is a 1975 Roosevelt dime missing the s mint. I recently found out that it is extremely rare and only two were discovered, I wish you can help me out please.

    Reply
  42. Hi Joshua: appreciate your willingness to help us newbies out. My 11 year-old daughter and I recently started searching coin rolls, and have probably searched over 10,000 Lincoln cents, finding a couple dozen wheat pennies and a smattering of question mark coins, the most interesting of which is this, a strike through of some kind(?), interesting for its uniformity and placement. We’re so sick of “wide AMs” and “Close AMs” we could puke, but this one definitely caught our eye …

    Reply
    • Hello, Timothy —

      I’m more than glad to help however I can. I lean toward your theory of a strikethrough given the patina of the affected area. Notice the color of the grooves? It’s virtually the same medium chocolate color as the rest of the field and devices, which suggests to me the aberration has to have been there since the coin was still new.

      Given the way the ridges and valleys are smoothly integrated into each other, I’d further believe the anomaly to be a strike-through error. If this is indeed such an error, its value could be between $5 and $10, perhaps more to an eager error enthusiast. The only way we could determine if this is indeed a strike-through would be to have a coin professional view it in-hand with a 5X or greater magnifying glass.

      I hope this helps!

      Thank you again for your question, and happy collecting!

      -Josh

      Reply
      • Thanks, Josh. The uniform patina is what made me think it was a strike-through in the first place. Interestingly, it’s stirring up some controversy over the on the Lincoln Cents forum with several conflicting opinions. I also found another coin online from ’58 with a very similar mark. The owner claimed “duct tape strike through.” Regardless, we’re learning more all the time and greatly appreciate your helpful response.

        Reply
        • You’re more than welcome, Timothy! Yes, the patina uniformity is definitely important in ascertaining a strike-through versus post-mint damage. Surely, PMD could have happened early on, but I also think the groove-like notches on that coin look like they flow too well with the metal to be something that was imparted on the surface afterward. That feature looks struck.

          Reply
  43. Dear Joshua,

    I found this at an auction in the bottom of a box, It’s a 1907 penny with the front and back struck on one side. It looks as if there is something on the flip side of the coin but it isn’t very clear as you can tell by the

    picture. Anything you could tell me about it would be greatly appreciated.

    Pam Schafer

    Reply
    • Hello, Pam —

      This would appear to be a post-mint impression. I can say this with a pretty solid degree of certainty because the two designs I see on this coin were not struck concurrently at the U.S. Mint.

      In fact, the 1907(?) date of the Indian Head cent design impressed on the Lincoln wheat ear piece (at the earliest, struck in 1909) would have made such an error virtually impossible. This is nevertheless an impressive-looking piece though!

      Reply
  44. Joshua,
    I have a pretty rare quarter I believe. It is stamped with Washingtons head on the front with what appears to be a nickel back lightly stamped in the back ground or possibly a state design. It is also broad struck with a very deep rim. The opposite side is totally blank. It is a modern day coin but has no date and my eye is not expert enough to tell what is stamped underneath Washington’s head. It is very light and has to be held at an angle to see it. Have you heard of thos before? Thank you.
    Blaine

    Reply
    • Hello, Blaine —

      I’ve heard of all kinds of wile broadstruck and other misstruck coins, but yours sounds pretty vivid. Would you please post a photo of your coin so I can determine what its value might be?

      Thanks!

      Reply
    • Hello, Marc —

      It’s hard to say for certain, but given the amount and type of rim damage on this coin, I suspect this coin was once embedded in a pendant or other type of jewelry hardware.

      Reply
    • Hello, Brittany —

      This is a very interesting-looking piece. It looks like somebody had a LOT of time on his or her hands, given how much of the reverse has been shaved down, except for the bird.

      You’re exactly right — this is a 50 States quarter. Good eye! In fact, this is a 2006 South Dakota quarter, with all the presidents on Mount Rushmore rubbed off the coin. The bird remaining on your coin is a Chinese ring-necked pheasant.

      While worth only 25 cents as a collector coin, I’d definitely hang onto your piece anyway, given its unique appearance.

      Thanks for checking!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Jimmy —

      Would you please post a photo of your coin here so I can better assist you?

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
  45. I had a quick question for anyone out there…I came across 5 1892 Indian head cents and didn’t know what they were worth…. Any help would be appreciated

    Reply
    • Hi, Joseph —

      If your coin is rotated more than 45 to 90 degrees, then there would be some significance to the value of your coin, though it would have to be tested for authenticity. Sight-unseen it’s hard to say for certain. I suggest that a professional coin dealer look at your coin in-hand or send it off to a third-party coin certification firm.

      Here are two links that may help you in finding a reputable coin dealer and learning more about third-party authentication companies.

      Coin dealers: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/coin_dealer/
      Coin authentication firms: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

      Reply
  46. hello. i’m austin and i found what looks like a 1958 D US penny that has laminate like marks as well as having had the rim completely gone during striking.
    here are a few porly focused shots. just wondering if such a thing could exist

    Reply
    • Hi, Austin —

      Thank you for posting those photos, though they appear a tad blurry to really look at the coin well enough for me to make a determination on the lamination. If you wouldn’t mind retaking the photos and posting those, that would be great, thank you.

      Best,
      Josh @ TheFunTimesGuide

      Reply
  47. I have a 2012 Denali quarter with a Washington face and also a reverse Jefferson new buffalo nickel face and I’m curious of the value

    Reply
    • Here’s a few more photos of it, please let me know if I have something worth anything more than face value

      Reply
      • Hi, Coty —

        Without examining the coin in-hand, I’m inclined to suggest that the Jefferson nickel image was hammered onto the quarter outside the mint; normally an error involving a coin being struck onto another would occur with the same denomination and happen when a coin that has been struck get jammed on the die. If this is what I suspect, then it would be worth face value.

        Reply
  48. I have a friend who has a penny that is the size of a pea. It looks like a normal penny just its so small. Have u ever seen anything like that befor?

    Reply
  49. I have a 1992 Quarter that is almost all copper. It has a small center section under the eagles wing on the back that is silver the rest all copper. The front Washington’s head is the only thing that has thin layer of
    silver.

    Reply
    • Hi, Doug —

      If you could please post a photo of this interesting-sounding coin, that would be most helpful.

      Thanks!
      Josh

      Reply
  50. I came across this quarter,what do you think ? how does that amount of material get taken out and the coin is still flat and round?

    Reply
  51. I have a 1994 nickel that is heads and tails on both sides. It’s not flat but not bent. The over print? Is off centered. Have you heard of this before and if so how much could it be worth?

    Reply
  52. I have a nickle that has the head on both side with different years one side has 2000 and the other side has 2001 on it please tell me if it is worth something.

    Reply
    • Hi, Valencia —

      You have an altered novelty coin; these are worth around 50 cents as novelty coins.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  53. i have a 1942 s broad strike wheat penny, looks a mazing very centered in good condition and is the same size as a quarter. what do you think it is worth?

    Reply
    • Hi, Ben —

      Whenever dealing with pieces like this it’s good to have them authenticated because there are so many counterfeits out there being passed off as errors, etc. Of course the first thing I’d want to know is how much does the coin weigh (it should still weigh 3.11 grams, more or less). What I find more concerning is that the lettering around what would be the rim looks too perfect in this photo. Normally it’s stretched out more on a broadstrike.

      If the diagnostics don’t check out I’d lean toward it being some type of alteration/token. However, as I can’t really inspect the coin in-hand I don’t want to rule out the possibility that it is a broadstrike. Lincoln broadstrikes can be worth anywhere from $10 to $20.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Linda –

      Actually, it sounds like you may have an illusionist’s coin — one that was altered to look like a two-tailed coin. While a novelty piece, these don’t really have any value to coin collectors per se. Such pieces do, however, sell for $2 to $3 or more as magician’s coins or novelty pieces.

      I hope this helps answer your question!
      Josh

      Reply
  54. Eugene Deem,got a two tailed quater when getting change for the slot machines in LAS VEGAS some time back.local coinexpert,suggest certification? sounds difficult.can you help?

    Reply
    • Hi, Eugene —

      Two-tailed coins are novelty pieces that are made from altering two real coins and combining them as one. While a neat find, this would have a value of only a couple dollars as a novelty coin.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  55. I have a gold dollar coin. It has 2 extra stamps of the year besides the main one. So it has 3 stamps of years. . . Is this coin worth anything?

    Reply
    • Hi, Jimmy —

      It sounds like your coin has been counterstamped outside of the U.S. Mint. I would need to please see the year of the coin to provide you with some idea as to value, but at a minimum, an authentic gold dollar is worth roughly bullion value, or about $50. A scarce date would be worth much more.

      Reply
  56. I have several error coins or what I think might be errors, how do you know if it is an error or maybe some ran over it. I will attach a photo to give an idea about one of them. This one is pretty rough so it could very well be a coin that was messed up by some other process than in the mint.
    PS… are there limits to the things you will look at for people?

    Reply
    • Hi, Donna —

      Great question, though unfortunately for the sake of convenience there is no particular general way of telling an error coin from one that has post-mint damage. Each error is unique and therefore must be examined by a professional individually to determine the cause of the surface anomalies. In the case of the quarter you submitted, each appears to be post-mint damage, and I will explain why.

      In the case of the quarter, do you notice how nothing is stamped on the smooth, or crumpled areas of the coin? If the quarter’s metal had originally been damaged before being struck, parts of the lettering would appear on those crumpled areas. Instead, the metal is worn smooth. This suggests the coin received extensive damage (it had been bent, too, it appears), thrusting the metal upwards around the edge of the coin and also mis-shaping the round diameter of the coin.

      As for the Jefferson nickel, it’s possible that the gouge may be a lamination error, but the damage to the rim right near the gouge suggests post-mint damage. However, the photo appears to be a tad fuzzy on my end. Perhaps a clearer photo of the entire coin would allow me to better evaluate that piece for you.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  57. This one is the a 1945 nickel that I think is maybe what you refer to as clipped. Very new to this and was going through my Mom’s (RIP) collection out of curiosity.

    Reply
  58. Hello Josh. I have a very interesting dime. It appears to be a fraction of a milimeter smaller than the rest of my dimes. And it appears that the rim is slightly raised compared to other dimes. In the pictures I have the dime in question on the left (the 1957) in the first 2 pics to show front and back. Then the last pic is the smaller dime on top of a regular sized dime (you can see the regular sized dimes edges sticking out a fraction of a milimeter). One other interesting thing about this dime, is the edges don’t appear to be reeded like a normal dime. Is this an error?

    Reply
    • Hello, Josh —

      Based on the photos I’m seeing, my first thought is that your dime had been rolled on its edge inside of a machine, with the centripetal force causing the rim to upset. This would also smooth out the reeding and cause the coin’s diameter to shrink. Perhaps it took a ride in a clothes dryer?

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Keith —

      I’ve seen similar weaknesses in the word LIBERTY on other early Lincoln cents. While interesting, the missing “L” in this case does not really add any value to the coin itself.

      Thanks for checking!
      Josh

      Reply
  59. Hi, Keith —

    Based on my inspection of your 1909 Lincoln cent in this photo, I would say that the “LIBERTY” appears normal for the coin. In many cases, either the “L,” “I,” or both appear weak on these piece due to strike issues and design layout. This looks like a nice piece though!

    Best,
    Josh

    Reply
  60. Hello, I have a quarter that is missing the last two years on the date… haven’t been able to Google anything about it?

    Reply
    • Hello, Justin —

      Interesting-looking piece to say the least. It appears as though there is some surface weakness anyway up by “LIBERTY” and “IN GOD WE TRUST.” While the date also appears weak, as seen in the “1” and “9,” the last two digits should still be apparent, leading me to wonder if this is either a case of a grease-filled die or somebody having removed the last two digits. I would need to take a really close look (with a magnifying glass/coin loupe) to see what caused the last two digits to simply disappear from the field. Upon close examination, do you see any striations/scratches to the right of the existing date? Any signs of surface manipulation?

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  61. I have a 1910 wheat penny that appears to have a dropped number or misplaced number. The 0 in 1910 looks to be misplaced at the top over the T in trust, but the 0 in the 1910 is still there just a little lighter than the others. I am not sure if it was made that way on purpose by someone, but using a magnifying glass it has the nice edges and coloring like it should and doesn’t look to be drilled into the coin. I don’t see and distortion or scratching though.. I am not sure what something like this could be worth, if anything due to the rough shape the actually penny is in..

    Reply
    • Hello, Sandi —

      The “0” in the date “1910” appears weak due to strike and wear issues (which aren’t uncommon on a coin of this vintage), but I am interested in learning more about what happened over the “T” on “TRUST.” There is no attributable variety (yet) with such an anomaly, but I am trying to zoom the photo in closer toward the raised ring. It appears to me that there is a concentric, cone-shaped divot inside the ring; is that what you see? If what I am seeing is the case, the ring would have been caused by displaced metal moving up around the damage site.

      Are you able to confirm that there is a divot in the middle of the raised ring, please (and thank you!)?

      Value-wise, at this point, and assuming the ring to be a type of post-mint damage (thought it may not be until I can further investigate the cause of malformation), I would say your coin is worth about 10 to 20 cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Yes, there is a small divot in the middle of the 0. There is no damage to the reverse of the coin though. The ring actually does not feel raised, but over time it most likely was smoothed out..

        Reply
        • Does it look possible that someone tried to punch a hole there, and when realizing it was off center, discontinued, and left the divot?

          Reply
  62. Hey Joshua, I have a 1986 penny with no mint mark and I think it has an error . It’s got an orange tint to it. (Like really orange) I was wondering if u can help me.
    I’ll try to get a picture for you. Thanks

    Reply
  63. Hi josh ,
    Im sorry im very new to this i jave several sets of coins sealed in plastic i think theyre called proof sets in one of the 1996 sets the kenedy half dollar is silver on the face side and gold on the reverse side ive looked and looked but havent been able to find any information on it is it worth anything ? Thanks mike h

    Reply
  64. Hello, Mike!

    I’m so glad you sent me these photos. First, I can assure this is a genuine mint package (I wasn’t sure in the initial comment if you were describing a real mint set or As-Seen-On-TV product.

    What happened is that the reverse of your Kennedy half dollar has toned to a golden hue, which could have happened for any number of reasons. These could include that the coin was exposed to a chemical before being packaged (very possible), or the coin has been subjected to mild but steady heat on that one side sometime in its past (a lot can happen to a coin — or mint set — in two decades); there could be other explanations, too.

    At any rate, modern toned coins are sometimes worth more than their nominal price guide values. Though the toned coin market is much more subjective than the prices paid for “standard” collectible coins, as it were.

    If you’re interested in selling, I’d suggest leaving the coin in the mint set packaging (which proves you didn’t tamper with it at all to create the toned effect) and consider selling it either on eBay or a local coin dealer.

    I really don’t know how much you would get for that piece – a lot of it depends, also, on the surface quality of the coin. The fewer nicks, bruises, and scratches, the more it’s worth. Though I can’t tell in the photo just how high the grade might be; perhaps a clearer, closer image of the half dollar might help me in that regard.

    Here’s more info on coin dealers: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/coin_dealer/

    I hope this is helpful!
    Josh

    Reply
    • Hello, Sam!

      Would you mind posting a photo of this piece? It sounds like a post-Mint impression of a dime that was hammered onto a Lincoln cent, but I don’t yet want to rule out the possibility of this being some type of Mint error.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
        • Hi, Mitch —

          Before you think about selling that coin, you will need to make sure it’s a legitimate 1944 steel cent and not simply a coin plated or altered to look like the rare coin.

          The first thing I suggest you to do is to test the coin and see if it sticks to a magnet. if it DOES, then you might have a steel cent on your hands. If not, then the coin was certainly altered. The next step is to weigh the coin. If it weighs 2. 7 grams, you may indeed have a 1944 steel cent. If it comes in way under or over that weight (by at least 0.1 gram), then the coin is simply altered.

          If the coin does stick to a magnet and weighs 2.7 grams, there is a fair chance it might be one of the couple dozen 1944 steel cents that were made. However, nobody is going to spend $100,000 on a coin that isn’t certified by a major coin authentication firm. At this point in the game, if your coin passes the initial hurdles outlined above, then you will want to submit it for certification.

          I have a link here that tells you more about these coin certification services: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

          I hope this helps, and I wish you the best of luck with your coin!

          Cheers,
          Josh

          Reply
  65. Back in 1965 I remember reading about some of the new pennies having an extra dot on the back under the E of E PLURIBUS UNUM. I brought several rolls of pennies and found 5 that I still have today. I haven’t seen on any website any info about the value of these coins. Can you offer any info about the value?

    Reply
    • Hi, William —

      Do you have a photo of the pieces? It might be a die chip of some sort. I could attribute with a photo of one of these coins that you have.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
      • I tried to take a picture but the camera I have isn’t able to focus close enough to see any detail. The dot isn’t distorted in any way it is the exact same size as the other dots around the E PLURIBUS UNUM. It almost looks like the die was made incorrectly. I will try to find someone with a quality camera and send you a pic as soon as I can.

        Reply
        • If you have a scanner, I would try to scan it and set it to the highest resolution possible to see what the results are, and if you can indeed see the error in question, I have had mixed results with this method, but it’s worth a shot. Maybe even add some dark colored paper to back it with, sometimes that helps with lighting issues. You can try to enlarge the image a little if it doesn’t affect the resolution too much.

          Reply
      • Were the photos clear enough for you to see what I’m trying to describe? With all of the coin collectors out there I think that it’s unusual that nobody has any information about this penny. I’m sure that it was something that I read (50 years ago) about the misstruck penny that made me go out and buy several rolls of pennies to search for the flaw. I couldn’t have brought more than 5 or 6 rolls of them to find the 4 that I have. I’m assuming that with that ratio that there must be thousands of these in circulation. If you like, I’ll send one of them to you for further inspection.

        Reply
        • Hi, William —

          Thank you for the offer, but I am unable to inspect coins sent to me through the mail. I have researched this very heavily and am trying to figure out what exactly was written about this coin five decades ago. Sometimes errors that didn’t catch on with the collecting public fall off the radar screen; perhaps that might be what happened here? I know of several other die varieties/errors that later disappeared because of this. I’m not suggesting that is what happened in this case, necessarily, but I’m trying to theorize why I can’t find anything about this coin. If you can provide a clear photo that would be most helpful for me; seeing the dot will allow me to research the cause of that specific error/variety and track down a possible attribution.

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
  66. I have a quarter that has a flat edge, like a nickel. Would that be considered a mint error and would it be worth more than 25 cents?

    Reply
    • Hi, Ashley —

      I will need to please see a photo; in all likelihood, the edge is flat due to extreme wear (I find a lot of older quarters in pocket change like this), though there are errors where the reeding (lines, or grooves) are absent. A photo of the edge and both sides (obverse, reverse) of your piece would help me determine what might be going on with your coin.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
  67. I have a penny that is smaller than usual, the stamping is light (making the date unreadable) but the indentation around the penny is deep. Is it worth anything?

    Reply
      • Hi, Sarah —

        My first thought is that it may have been a struck-through capped die error, but I have a feeling what actually happened here is that the coin took a ride on its edge inside a drier or other machine that would have applied much centripetal force to the coin, thus upsetting the rim and causing the coin to essentially collapse inward onto itself upon a hypothetical axis. Note, too, that the details on the coin are much sharper near the protected areas around the rim than toward the center of the coin, which is more exposed to wear.

        Assuming the centripetal force theory to be correct, this piece is essentially worth face value.

        I think this is still an interesting piece to hang onto, though!
        Josh

        Reply
      • While Joshua’s observations may be plausible, I would still take it somewhere to double check that this may indeed have happened at the mint.

        Reply
        • Always double check, but I’ve seen several dozen of these before — capped die errors have a distinctly different appearance from a coin that was damaged by centripetal edge pressure. Note, the rim was rolled in OVER the lettering.

          Reply
  68. Hey josh i a 1972-s penny in my home and it seems to have a double die on the reverse side
    Left corner of the monument and the S on the word states and would like to get ur opinion.Is this considered a double die error. Ive posted a pic of it as best as i could.

    Reply
    • Hi, Armando —

      While some 1972-S Lincoln cents are double dies, this appears to be a normal coin with some post-mint metal flaws. This piece, being a copper one-cent coin, is worth saving, but it’s worth about 2 cents for its metal value.

      Thank you for your question!
      Josh

      Reply
      • I have to disagree, I’m no expert, but it appears to indeed have some minor doubling. I don’t see how this could be PM damage. Now whether or not the doubling is true doubling or machine doubling, I couldn’t tell you, but it does appear doubled to me.

        Reply
        • None of this matches any of the diagnostics for attributed doubled dies from that issue though. It’s always possible a new variety may exist, but if there is any doubling present, it’s likely machine doubling.

          Reply
  69. I’m looking for someone to point me in the right direction. I found this 2006 dime a while back with a very distinct “crack” across the face. No apparent damage to any other part of the coin, the reverse is flawless, suggesting that it was not simply bent or otherwise tampered with. What would you call this error?

    Reply
    • Mike,

      Great catch. This is a genuine error; from what I can tell in the photo this is a significant die crack or split die; while minor die cracks don’t bring much, if any, premium, this piece is definitely appealing because the break is so prominent and touches the rim (twice, I might add). Values range on each individual coin, but based on recent eBay transactions, this piece might bring $75 to $100 or more.

      Great work with this. I suggest if you’re interested in selling it that you might want to get it certified by a third-party coin grading company, which may help the piece fetch even more and make it more marketable still.

      Here’s info on coin certification companies: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

      And here’s more on how to find a good coin dealer: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/coin_dealer/

      This is a link with a searchable database of reputable coin dealers: https://www.pngdealers.org/find-a-png-dealer

      Best!
      Josh

      Reply
      • Thanks a lot Josh. I’ll probably hold onto it for now, I enjoy the novelty of it, but it’s very cool to know it’s a genuinely unusual find and may be valuable. Keep up the good work, this page is an awesome resource!

        Reply
        • Thank you so much for your kind comments, Mike! Absolutely hang onto that coin; don’t forget, coins often go up in value over time, so what might be worth face value or a nominal amount today could be much more valuable in the years ahead.

          Cheers,
          Josh

          Reply
  70. I have a 1942s wheat penny that the medal of the penny is two toned it has dark streaks in the metal. Is this a metal error? Thanks

    Reply
  71. And Josh this site won’t let me upload a picture but I would so be willing to email you a picture please let me know what email to send picture to.

    Reply
  72. Hi josh my name is kailyn i have a quick question i have fond a 1983 dime that have the edge flat of a penny i will like to know if it have any value

    Reply
    • Hi, Kaylin —

      While I can’t say for certain without seeing your specific coin, I have seen many other dimes just like the one you describe, and every time the edge has been worn smooth (like a penny’s) due to long-term wear.

      In those cases, the dimes are still worth a dime.

      I hope this answers your question! Please feel free to upload a photo if you wish and I’ll be glad to still take a look.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  73. Can anyone help me with an extra thick quarter? I found a 1985 US quarter today that is approximately 1 mm or 2 thicker than any other quarter. Also, one side is even a little thicker than the rest. I found this out by trying to stick it into the dryer at the laundromat, and it wouldn’t fit. It’s in amazing condition, really shiny with no wear at all to it. It does not have any other errors and every other detail is exactly the same as every other 1985 quarter. Does anyone know why this quarter would be thicker than a normal quarter? Thanks so much!

    Reply
    • Hi, Michelle —

      I’d be interested in seeing a photo of the quarter if you don’t mind, and even more so curious about what it weighs. A typical 1985 U.S. quarter should weigh 5.67 grams.

      This sounds like a neat find!
      Josh

      Reply
  74. Hi, Keith —

    It looks like doubling from the photo you sent; I referenced several different Van Allen-Mallis variety directories to see if this might be an attributed die variation. I don’t see any listing for this particular piece based on the portions of the coin I have seen so far.

    I suggest you consider submitting this to a VAM Morgan dollar variety website to see if it might be attributed. Here’s one site to consider: https://www.vamworld.com/

    I hope this helps!
    Josh

    Reply
    • Hi, Robert —

      It sounds like you have an altered piece; the gold toning could be either toning or plating, but the “53” stamps are definitely post-mint additions.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  75. Hello Josh, I have found a 2013-D penny in circulation that looks very odd. I am not sure
    what kind of mint error it is, or if it it valuable. I have attached
    some pictures, do you know what might be going on here?

    Reply
    • Hi, Ivan —

      I notice the high points of the coin are worn down, exposing the interior zinc core. This could have only been done after the coin left the mint. It looks like someone took a belt sander to both sides of this coin. Eye popping, yes, but this piece was altered and is worth face value.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  76. Hello Josh,

    I have a quarter I’ve had for a number of years that has a penny embedded in the back of it. I’m not sure if it’s worth anything or was altered by someone, but it’s interesting none the less! Have you ever seen anything like this? Thankyou for your time 🙂

    Steve

    Reply
    • Hi, Steve –

      An interesting piece indeed. It appears as though somebody glued (perhaps using a metal bonding agent) these two coins together. While I hope this marriage is a happy one, its not a numismatic rarity. I’d still hang onto it if for nothing else than for novelty’s sake.

      Best!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Heather!

      An “S” on Lincoln’s sleeve? This sounds like a post-mint inscription of some kind. Sometimes these of coins have a very small additional value as a novelty collectible, especially if the counterstamp can be traced back to its origins and/or was once used a token or souvenir of some type.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  77. Hi, Jair!

    These are very helpful photos. Here is my opinion on each of your coins:

    The Delaware quarter: from what I see, the coin, including the horse, looks normal for the most part. I blew up the reverse image to see the horse more closely and it appears that the gap may be post-mint damage; I also see several scratches on the surface which implies to me that the coin has seen some damage over its time. It is worth face value.

    1980-D Washington quarter: This coin has seen some significant damage over its 36 years. It looks like the edge and rim has received some significant bruising, but there are numerous surface marks on the obverse and reverse. This is an eye-popping example of post-mint damage. One perhaps worthy of hanging onto as it looks so unusual, but this coin is worth face value.

    1936-D Mercury dime — I love giving good news whenever I can, and there is some to be had here. This is a gorgeous circulated Mercury dime that is worth $2.50 to $3 in this condition. Keep it just as it is, and be sure NOT to clean it! In the photo, it appears to have some nice natural patina.

    Dollar — It appears you may be pointing out some edge nicks around the edge lettering of this dollar coin? That is what stands out to me on this coin, which — unless there are some unusual mint-origin characteristics on the obverse or reverse — is worth face value.

    Thank you for your questions! Keep on checking your change!

    Best,
    Josh

    Reply
        • Hello, Griselda —

          It appears you have an altered coin used as a gaffe piece for illusionists. While likely worth $2 or $3 to an interested magician, such pieces have no numismatic value.

          Thank you for your question!
          Josh

          Reply
  78. Hi, Jair —

    There certainly appears to be a die crack on the New Hampshire quarter — those types of die varieties can be worth $5 to $10. I’m trying to see what you’re pointing out with the Alaska quarter. The photo isn’t blowing up so maybe I’m missing it. What seems to the anomaly with that coin?

    Best,
    Josh

    Reply
    • Thanks a lot Joshua; I appreciate so much your help. About the Alaska coin, I compared this coin with others Alaska, and gene las two fingers seem to be united, not like other Alaska coins. Again thanks for your help!

      Reply
      • Unfortunately I can’t blow up the image any further to verify, but there is a die-crack variety that affects some of these coins in the precise area you’re speaking of, which creates a blob of metal between the two last claws. If this is the case, your piece is worth between 50 cents and $1.

        Good luck!
        Josh

        Reply
  79. I found a 1985 quarter with only one side printed,the other side is blank and flat. Could this be worth anything?

    Reply
    • Hi, Alicia —

      This coin was altered, possibly for use as an illusionist’s coin. Such pieces have value only in the novelty coin market and is likely worth around $1 to $2.

      Interesting find!
      Josh

      Reply
  80. Josh, I am curious about a 1964 D Jefferson I found. Any information on it would be appreciated. It has some odd strikes on it, and I can’t seem to find anything online about it. There’s one above the shoulder on the collar. On the reverse, they’re on and below the house. It appears that between the strikes, the letters in “five” and “cents”, don’t show up. Have you ever seen anything like that?

    Reply
    • Hi, Steven —

      There’s clearly some type of metal interruption on the reverse of the 1964. There appear to be some raised criss-cross shapes (looks like a large “M”) on the reverse. What I wonder is if this is some type of strike-through error; I’m not comfortable calling this post-mint damage without a closer look. An in-hand inspection would serve this coin well to hep determine the cause of the situation.

      Perhaps a local coin professional, such as a dealer, might be able to offer an opinion after looking at the coin in-hand at different angles under magnification. Or, you could have the coin evaluated by a third-party certification firm.

      Here’s more info on those two suggestions:

      Coin Certification Firms – https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/
      List of Coin Dealers Around the US – https://png.memberclicks.net/find-a-png-dealer

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
      • Well, I’ll have to take it to someone and have them check it out in person. I’d really like to know more about it. I’ll post some more pictures that show the strike a bit better. It appears to me that “Five Cents” and “States Of” were struck on top of the interruption. What is your take on that after looking at these next pictures? Thanks again.

        Reply
        • Hi, Steven –

          I’m not sure if this is either a type of strike-through error or lamination. I think an in-hand evaluation will determine if it’s either or something else, as looking at the coin from different angles under strong lighting and magnification will help us figure out what’s going on.

          I wish you the best!
          Josh

          Reply
  81. Hello, so I found a dime, silver dime 1998 p with no edge. Not a flat or smooth but just empty as if the coin comes apart witch it does not… Any thoughts

    Reply
      • Thanks for responding.. So I took 3 pictures for you of the one in question and one of a normal dime.

        Reply
          • Hi, Kendra —

            As best as I can tell from the photos, the flat edge appears to be due to wear. I would have suggested a possible mint error, but the problem here is that the rim of the coin is present. When a dime is struck, it is struck inside of a collar that imparts the reeding, or grooves that most dimes have. Sometimes, coins are struck without their collar, but in that case, the coin would have been flatter and wider than usual (broadstrike), which is not the case here.

            While this coin looks unusual, I would put its value at 10 cents because it appears to be a victim of post-mint damage.

            Thank you for your question and the photos!
            Josh

    • Hi there, Bryan!

      Your Mount Rushmore quarter is worth face value if it is worn and between 40 cents and 75 cents if it is in typical uncirculated condition.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  82. Hi I have a 1986 silver jefferson nickel that is extremely thin everything looks like a normal nickel on the front but on the back there are circular ripples from the middle outward. There is no edge. Is it worth anything? What do you call this type of error?

    Reply
    • Hi, Kandi –

      Would you please post a photo of the coin? Based on the description it may be an error, or it may have been corroded, but I unfortunately can’t say for sure without seeing the coin.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
        • Hi, Kandi —

          I’m afraid your nickel had been ground down, perhaps by a drill-powered sander, wiping away the design. Such a piece, being altered (damaged), isn’t worth anything in the numismatic sense. I think it is still an interesting piece to hold onto anyway!

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
  83. Hello Joshua;

    I found this 1968 dime that looks like it has a mixture of copper and nickel dyes. Do you think it’s worth more than 10 cents?

    Diana

    Reply
    • Hello, Diana —

      While your 1968 Roosevelt dime indeed contains both copper and nickel, the staining is due to a chemical reaction. While eye-popping, this coin is worth face value.

      Thank you for your question!
      Josh

      Reply
  84. Josh,

    I’ve got a Kansas quarter with error – looks like it says “IN OD WE RUST” … You can vaguely see the G & T … but they’re almost invisible when you turn the quarter to it’s side and glance at it.

    Reply
    • Hi, Kristy —

      It sounds like it may be a weak die strike, but I really can’t say for sure without seeing a photo of the coin, please.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
  85. Josh,
    I found this penny while going through my coin collection jars. Just curious if it’s worth anything? Looks like the strike was off just a bit.

    Reply
  86. Hey Josh,

    I have three Nickels I found in my coin jar. They are as follows:

    1941 Nickel with no mint mark
    1943 Nickel with P for mint mark
    1946 Nickel with no mint mark

    How much do you think they are worth?

    Thanks

    Reply
    • HI, Chad!

      Great finds! The 1941 and 1946 Jefferson nickels are worth 10 to 20 cents each, and your 1943-P Jefferson five-cent coin is actually a wartime issue that has a 35 percent silver composition. It’s worth about $1.85.

      Hint for the future — all Jefferson nickels made between 1942 and 1945 on which the “P” (Philadelphia), “D” (Denver), or “S” (San Francisco) mintmark appear above the dome of Monticello on the reverse all wartime issues that contain silver.

      Here’s more info on war nickels: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/silver_nickels/

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
  87. Broadstruck North Carolina State Quarter found in a vending machine. Has verdigris on it, any guess as to the value?

    Reply
    • Hi, John —

      Based on the photos, it looks more like an off-center error, and one with about 10 percent displacement. Such pieces (in the case of a modern Washington quarter) are worth around $3 to $5.

      Thank you for your question!
      Josh

      Reply
      • Thank you for answering my question and giving your opinion. I have been told on a coin forum that it is an off-center broadstrike error. The coin does not have any reeding on the edge, it is completely smooth and consistent on the edge.

        Reply
  88. Hi everyone! I inherited quite a coin collection years ago. Just recently I’ve been going through all of them and came across the 1964 penny with some serious errors. What confuses me is why it looks red in some places. Almost like red paint. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    Reply
    • Hi, Joe!

      Very interesting pieces indeed! The red appears to be corrosion, which is common with bronze coin such as the Lincoln cent.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  89. Hi i was wondering if this would be considered a double die error and if so what might be the value i noticed on the date of the penny the 989 looks doubled more so on the 89 then the first 9 and if this is an error what do i do to verify or sell whatever. Thank you

    Reply
    • Hi, Tammy —

      Great set of eyes you have! Yes, there is some doubling there in the date and mintmark. I did zoom in on the coin and the photo gets a tad grainy at that stage, so I can’t tell what the borders/edges of the doubled areas look like. Determining that is key to figuring out if this is a doubled die (worth potential money) or machine doubling (worth little, if anything, over face).

      If you might be able to upload a bit crisper of an image, and possibly zoom right in on the date, that would be much appreciated!

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
  90. I am looking for information on an error coin I have that is a 1997 dime who’s face has been struck over with the back design of a penny. Have you ever seen this miss-strike or have any clue of what it might be worth? I’ve had collectors offer me money for it saying they’d never seen such an error but I don’t want to be “taken” if it has more value! thank you for any information you might have!

    Reply
    • Hi, Denver —

      Based on what you describe, it sounds like your piece may actually be an illusionist’s trick coin, which allows a dime to fit inside a hollowed-out cent. These are worth only $2 to $3 as novelty pieces. I would be glad to check out a photo of your coin if you’d like.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  91. I’ve found a 1997 D cent that is the width of a nickel! Any clue what this might be? Thank you for any help you can give me .

    Reply
    • Hi, Doris —

      Would you mind providing me with an image of the cent stacked right on top of the nickel? From this angle, based on screen measurements, it appears the nickel and cent are different, and respectively normal, diameters.

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Thank you for your response. This was a poor picture. I am sending pictures of the cent in question on a nickel, next to a cent with a cent next to a nickel. Also I will send a cross picture of the cent next to s nickel. Thank you for any help.

        Reply
        • Hi, Doris —

          Hmm.. in that photo the cent still appears smaller than the nickel. Let’s try confirming the measurements this way — have you checked the diameter of the cent independently?

          It should measure 19 millimeters wide, while the nickel should come in at 21.2 millimeters.

          Thank you for uploading the photos,
          Josh

          Reply
          • Hi! I measured my cent and it measures 21.22! It’s detail is not distorted so I am curious what it could be!

          • Hi, Doris —

            This is very peculiar — there is no indication this is a broadstrike error, which could in theory be easily wider than normal. Plus, the design on this coin is of proper proportions. What’s interesting about this measuring device is that the left side of the grasper seems to line up with the 1 mm (not 0 mm) mark and the right side also has a similar spacing issue. I’m not sure if the readout accounts for that differential automatically or not.

            Assuming this readout is correct, then I’m not sure what’s going on here, because this really looks like a normal one-cent coin in every respect as far as the design, etc. Plus, I see no indication that the coin was flattened post mint, thus stretching its diameter beyond normal.

            If this piece really is 21.22 millimeters wide as the device suggests, it might be worth getting the coin inspected in-hand (and weighed, too). My only other suggestion is that the coin might be some type of replica piece, but I think that is unlikely. Again, the design appears normal — and it only fits that way, within the rim proportions and skew, on a coin that measures 19.1 millimeters.

            This is quite the head-scratcher! I wish I could provide a more conclusive answer for you. I appreciate all of the photos and info you’ve provided.

            If we can get a weight on the coin, that may help us further…

            Best,
            Josh

          • Thank you for your expertise! I will take it to a local coin expert. I agree it’s head scratcher. Sincere thanks.

          • You’re most welcome, Doris! I must confess it isn’t often at all that I’m stumped like this when readers such as yourself provide such great photos, info, and data/measurements of their coins. If you don’t mind posting here what you find out, I’d be very interested in learning what you discover.

            Good luck,
            Josh

          • Hi Josh
            That’s the story of my life lol! If I had a nickel for every time I’ve heard this. Anyway, I look forward to sharing any information I can get. Thank you again. Doris

    • Very nice find, Lydia! Not only is this nickel approximately 50% off, but the date shows — that makes this a premium type of off-center error. Its value should be around $5.

      Cheers,
      Josh

      Reply
        • Hi, Lydia —

          There is no way to predict whether or not a coin’s value will go up; however, given the past history on these types of errors, I would not expect to see the values rise sharply any time soon.

          I hope this helps,
          Josh

          Reply
    • Hi, Shannon —

      Would you please submit a photo of the quarter and zoom in on the obverse where the mintmark is? While a regular, well-struck 1974-D quarter that is worn is worth face value, perhaps the “D” mintmark might be repunched or have something else going on that makes it stand out.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  92. I have a 1983 penny that liberty is misspelled (LLBERTY) I have looked all over and haven’t found one like it. Have you seen this before? And is it something to hang on to?

    Reply
    • Hi, Bucky —

      Would you please submit a photo of this coin here in the comments section?

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Iv tryed the website saying its to big so iv changed and crop yhe pic still will not up load do u havr a email adress i can send it to thanks

        Reply
        • Hi, Bucky…

          Display the photo on your computer, grab a screen shot, crop that, save it, and then send THAT image to the page. I bet that will work!

          Good luck!
          Josh

          Reply
  93. Hey I found this 1978 Quarter with a very high rim around the outside of both sides and no ridges around the outer edge. Is this worth anything? Photographed next to regular quarter for comparison. Was pretty cool to find, it felt so weird in my hand i thought it was fake..

    Reply
    • Hello, Q —

      It looks like your 1978 quarter has experienced high degrees of centrifugal force, perhaps by rolling around the inside of a clothes dryer for a period of time. While such pieces are very eye-catching, they are worth face value.

      I’d suggest hanging on to it as a neat-looking oddity!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • There is no chance a laundry machine or centrifugal force of any type found in normal non labaratory settings, caused this coin to have a 2-3 mm rim on both sides. The physics of it make that an impossibility. Thanks for your reply but what you are suggesting is well outside the science of physics.

        Reply
        • Hello,

          The only other explanation is a capped die error, which based on the images you provided is simply not the case; there are not enough diagnostics to support this being a capped die. Coins spun and tumbled inside dryers look like the one in the image you sent; dryer coins, as they are called are, well documented across the internet on well-vetted numismatic sites, as they are on this popular coin forum (a site to which I don’t contribute): https://www.coincommunity.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=143863

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
    • Hi, Victoria —

      You don’t by chance have the weight of this coin, do you? While this would appear to be a post-mint alteration, the blank surface of the coin has some characteristics that appear original. How did you find this coin?

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
  94. I have found a 2016 dime just want to know is it worth of saving they r both mis printed on the front back is good

    Reply
  95. I’ve got a 1983 penny that looks like it’s double die and the letter under 1983 looks like it could be an error maybe as well. Any ideas? Thx!

    Reply
    • Hi, Pat —

      Let’s hope it is a doubled die! I tried to examine the reverse (back side) of the coin, where the doubling would be present. However, the image is a bit blurry upon zoom. Would you please send me a clearer photo of the reverse if possible?

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
  96. I’ve got a 1942-D wheat penny that is very interesting. The word “Liberty” is spelled ” Liierty” there is a very distinctive second “I” where the “B” should be and its tilted a little also. There is no letter “B” anywhere in the word. Another possible error is the “D” mint mark looks like it might be doubled. I took it to the local coin dealer to have it sent off to PCGS to be graded, but the dealer only submitted it for the grade and not the attribute or error. Please look at it and tell me what you think. I have searched all over the internet and I have not seen a single other coin with liberty misspelled like it is on this coin.

    Reply
    • Hi, Jasion —

      The dealer submitted the coin only for the grade likely because the “I” and surface issues around the date all appear to be post-mint concerns. In fact, the second “I” looks like it may have been an intentional alteration given some metal disfluencies I see around that part of the coin and on the “I” itself.

      While it’s always possible this could come back as a variety of some type, based on what I see in the photos it’s a regular coin with a few eye-catching post-mint surface issues. Fingers crossed that someone at PCGS determines this to be something more.

      All my best,
      Josh

      Reply
  97. Me and my girlfriend found a 1980 penny with a error on the back in the word states but it was spelled 3tates. What does it mean?

    Reply
  98. My dad is a life-long coin enthusiast, so I’ve always been interested in coins as well. In my change today, I spotted a die rotation error on a 1989 quarter. When flipping the coin vertically I estimate it to have around a 50-60 degree CW rotation of the reverse image. Is this worth keeping? Approximate value?

    Reply
  99. Hi Joshua, I have a 1926 wheat penny that appears to have an extra wide rim which interferes with the letters of in God we trust and E Pluribus Unum plus the word Liberty is missing the L because of the edge. Any ideas of the value of this coin?

    Reply
    • Hello, Tami!

      The rim appears flatter due to heavy wear. I am trying to blow up the photo and see if it is a 1926-D or 1926-S; the former is worth about 75 cents in that grade, whereas the latter has a value of about $5 to $6.

      Thanks for your question and photos,
      Josh

      Reply
  100. Greetings Joshua,
    I found this quarter that is missing a number and wanted to know if this is considered a rare coin? and if so does it hold value? Thank you in advance for your answer!

    Reply
    • Hello, Asonji —

      While it looks like it could be a post-mint alteration, I notice some weakness in the other digits of the date, including the “9.” If this is a mint variety/error, it’s likely due to a filled die and could potentially bring a few dollars (perhaps $3 to $8) depending on the buyer.

      Great find!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Tami —

      The stripes are not a mint error, but rather are stains. It looks like they may have been caused by the coin being placed in a paper-based coin folder or album.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • There is texture to all of the lines so it definitely is not just a stain. do you know of any reason why there would be textured lines?

        Reply
        • Hi, Tami –

          Texturing could have been caused by a number of agents, including adhesives or contact with sulfurous materials (which do a number on copper-based coins). While an in-hand examination is the only way for a coin professional to say for certain what’s going on with your coin, the photo does not present any signs of this being a mint-made error, especially given the metal patterning. Whatever happened to cause those lines happened after the coin was struck.

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
  101. Hi Josh.

    I found a 1989 D 1 penny that is printed upside down/ inverted and wanted to know if it was worth anything? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hi, Michael —

      This sounds like a great find, but I’d need to please check the rims, edge, and other surfaces of your coin to ensure it’s an authentic rotational error and not an altered piece. If you don’t mind submitting clear closeups of your 1989-D Lincoln cent, that would be most helpful!

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
        • Hi, Michael —

          I see what looks to be some very minute surface irregularities… Is there by chance a photo of the coin’s edge that I may see?

          Thank you!
          Josh

          Reply
    • Hello, Tammy!

      Great find. This appears to be a strikethrough error, meaning the coin was struck through some type of substance, possibly grease. Such errors are usually worth $50 to $100.

      Nice discovery!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Cynde —

      I would need to see the reverse of the 1993-D dime to rule out an error, but it appears to be what we might call a “dryer coin” — one that was centrifuged inside a machine (perhaps a clothes dryer), which can force the rim and edges upward around the coin.

      If you can kindly send me a photo of the coin’s reverse so I can double check the coin entirely, I’d be happy to take a second look.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
  102. I have a penny that reads 012, on the date it was made. Can someone tell what had happened to the whole date?

    Reply
  103. I found a 1996 quarter silver on the heads side and copper on the tail side could you tell me if this coin might be worth anything?

    Reply
    • Hi, Tina —

      It sounds like the copper core of the cupro-nickel clad coin may be exposed but I’m not sure without seeing a photo of the coin. If you want to kindly submit a photo of it I’d be glad to check.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Ronald —

      This is very interesting. Is there any vertical height difference between the nickel and copper layers?

      I suggest sending this in to variety and error expert John Wexler for inspection. Here’s the link: https://doubleddie.com/

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Gregory —

      Based on what I see in the photo, this is a normal 1982 large date cent. If it weighs 3.11 grams (more or less), it’s made from a copper base and is worth two cents due to its metal value.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
        • Hi, Gregory —

          I’m blowing up the image as big as I can. It’s a little blurry at high focus and examining the neck and head areas but I am still not seeing anything unusual about this coin. It appears to have been lightly worn, which contributes to the lighter copper colors. Can you please tell me what errors or other unusual things you’re seeing on this coin in-hand under magnification? Perhaps if I could check out a version of the image with higher resolution under zoom mode I might see other things, too.

          Thank you,
          Josh

          Reply
          • Hi Josh.If look between face and end of the nose you see is missing sum part.And look missing mouth

  104. Hello, I’m from the UK so I’m not too familiar with American coins, my apologies.
    I have a JFK Half Dollar 1971, the coin seems correct but one side is upside down – not sure if this is correct? Thanks

    Reply
    • Hello, Rob —

      U.S. coins are struck with a so-called coin die alignment, meaning each side of the coin is oriented the opposite of the other. Conversely, most nations under British rule use medallic die alignment, in which both sides of the coin face the same direction. So, your 1971 Kennedy half dollar is normal from the standpoint of die alignment and, because it is worn, is worth its face value in U.S. dollars. It may have slightly better collector value in the U.K. since U.S. coins are more of a novelty there, just as British coins, even common circulated specimens have a slight premium in the states for their collector value.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Wendy —

      While the digits may be tilted or look a little different, the variances are within the tolerances. At this point, there is not a significant market for edge lettering variances, save for huge things, such as missing digits, etc. I’d probably hang onto the coins that seem to have the most significant differences, such as the 2007-P dollar in the last photo, just in case there is ever a big collector interest for those types of minting anomalies.

      All the best,
      Josh

      Reply
  105. I have this odd looking 1980 quarter. It doesn’t have a rim and is missing the outer edges of the pattern. Can you tell me anything about it?

    Reply
    • Hello, Gracie —

      This coin has received excessive edge wear, and this wear has resulted in a beveled appearance. It looks as though the wear or abrasion may have been intentionally applied to the edge of the coin. This quarter is worth face value.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Junior —

      What you have is an altered quarter — somebody machined the reverse side off, and that could have been done for any number of reasons. At any rate, this damaged coin is unfortunately not worth anything since it really can’t be spent even as a quarter. If I found this coin, I’d simply keep it as an interesting oddity, because it’s pretty neat when something like this winds up in your pocket change.

      Thank you for your question and photos!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Sarah!

      It looks like the obverse of your wheat cent was hollowed out, possibly to be used as a magician’s coin (which allows a dime to sit inside the penny and “turn into” a dime or penny. The coin has also experienced an incredible amount of obverse corrosion. This is common with old copper coins, and while we’ll never know what date it is, it certainly is an interesting piece. It has no numismatic value but is still a piece I’d keep anyway.

      Thank you for your question and photos!
      Josh

      Reply
  106. I have a wheat penny off center stamp, It is WAY off, I was just wondering how much it was worth. I can’t get a picture but you can see a tiny bit of wheat on the very outer edge and on the other side, part of the word “trust”, it is stamped at the VERY outer edge and you can only notice it is a wheat penny because of the wheat. Thanks,

    Evan

    Reply
  107. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/92cd9f476ff3d3d44c2033e4c7cf3c616f31b3cba260c69494acb815caa71fb2.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/18261831b04ddba0c544a67aa7d31e1333366d12110bde69ff2ae9593ac07fcb.jpg Hi Joshua,

    I have a peculiar coin (39mm diameter, 27gms weight, silver looking) without denomination. The obverse side does not carry a denomination, but instead carries the year of minting, 1880, but the zero in 1880 is slightly off-center. The back of the coin contains only 10 stars as compared to the 13. I want to know if this is a rare coin or an error coin. Would you be able to throw some light on that?

    Reply
    • Hi, Chaitu —

      I’ve never seen a piece like this before, but based on characteristics of it I would say it is some type of private market token. I wish I could assist further, but I can’t find any listing anywhere, and I can’t even find comparison pieces on discussion boards or eBay at this time. I wish I could help you with this.

      All my best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Dylan —

      If it’s a modern golden dollar coin, the date is on the edge of the coin.

      I hope this info helps!
      Josh

      Reply
  108. Hey I have a penny with the the whole face side missing. Is it worth anything? The lincoln memorial side is still there. The coin is in good condition.

    Reply
  109. I have a newer US Dime with the entire heads side missing. Just a pressed blank with some copper showing and a divot in the center. It appears to entirely genuine with the tails side and edge in perfect condition. How many millions can I expect to get? Lol, what’s it really worth?

    Reply
    • Hello, James —

      Very interesting… Would you please upload an image of this dime so I can further assist you?

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Probably a clad. If you take a dime, quarter after 1964 OR a half-dollar after 1970, you’d see a copper-silver rim most of the time. Nickel and copper are probably used. But its very unlikely there is a half-nickel half-copper composition.

      Reply
  110. I was dumping my change in a Coinstar. The machine spit out a coin it didn’t accept and it was a plain US penny. However, it was grated around the circumference and silver much like a dime.

    Reply
  111. Hi Joshua,
    My husband and I recently came into 100’s of old coins (mostly silver almost all proofs, bullions,wheat pennies, barber and mercury dimes, etc.) We don’t know much at all, but your forums have really been helping us. From the looks of it we have the most half dollars, Franklin and Roosevelt. What is the best thing to be looking out for on those? I have a few from 1964 that say NNNCGN, not sure what that means. Thank you for your time. Any advice is greatly appreciated.

    Reply
    • Hello, Tori!

      Thank you, first of all, for your great feedback and comments on the posts. I’m glad to assist however I can here. Perhaps the best place to get started is seeing what you have and figuring out what the basic values are.

      Have you seen the post here that covers the values of most 20th century coins? I think you’ll find it very helpful in getting a better understanding on the values of most 20th-century U.S. non-gold coins: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/us-coins/

      If you’d like to take your coins for an in-hand evaluation at a local coin dealer, consider these two links:

      5 Surefire Tips for Finding a Good Coin Dealer: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/coin_dealer/
      Searchable List of Coin Dealers Near You: https://png.memberclicks.net/find-a-png-dealer

      All the best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Thank you Joshua, I will definitely look into those links. Also if you don’t mind I’m going to post a few pictures of one’s I feel may be a little more special than the others. This one for starters, this is 1954 proof set, but the coins especially the dime as you can see are discolored. I’ve heard it all about eye appeal, but in this case would it make it more valuable or less? I also found an Indian head penny in a case that’s toned and the details are perfect, you can read every letter of liberty, I’ll post pictures of that one soon. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/907c77dacd5ccebe54ba20a134b4281ee3da20748ef9beb6fa333778d3d3208e.jpg

        Reply
        • GREAT question, Tori . As you know the 1954 proof set is indeed a collector set, and this one is worth about $90 base price… BUT, you asked me about the color of the Roosevelt dime. Toning is a highly subjective matter when it comes to desirability and pricing. However, it appears (I can’t tell for sure from a photo alone) that this dime may have rainbow toning — something that collectors, in general, highly value. The coin would have to be graded to get a determination on the coin’s overall state of preservation, etc., but I believe that dime alone could (could, I emphasize) carry the set, value wise, into the hundreds, or perhaps even more.

          What date is the Indian Head cent? Please post a few photos if you wish and I’ll be glad to help!

          All my best,
          Josh

          Reply
  112. Have a 1972 dime I got in change years ago in Colorado. I wonder how much this dime would be worth. I’m wondering if more than one dime was being struck at the same time, revealing a backless dime. One side, the obverse side was struck but not the reverse side. Reverse side of dime is flat and shiny. The side view you can see the sandwiched metal, however, there are no side grooves. This specific dime is a tad thicker than other dimes. Is this a rarity or, of value?

    Reply
  113. Hi Josh.
    I’ve recently CRH’ed and I’ve found a 1958 nickel with a grease error? The “S” on five cents is a little bit worn. Only the S. It’s in AU55 coindition. By this means, how much do you think its worth?

    Reply
    • Hi, Gulinky —

      I’d have to see how weak the “S” is but I would agree that it is likely a grease error — the common cause behind selective weakness on a coin. A 1958 Jefferson nickel in AU is worth around 15 cents.

      All the best,
      Josh

      Reply
  114. Hey Josh Lady Here! So after realizing how very little i actually new about coin collecting and hate being the kid in class who always ask questions when the aswer is on the board, i decided to take notes and study first!
    I recently went to a store and asked if they had and half or dollar coins available and recieved this rare 1979 D, S.B.A Dollar coin. Its not in the best condition but its beautiful for a circulated 1979!
    I decided to research known rarities or Known errors and came up with little to nothing witg Mint D, which really intrigued me to look harder.
    I found what at first i thought to be DDR or Doubled striking on The tail of the “R” in the word Dollar, Until I then noticed a possible error on the Obverse side “R” in liberty appears to be actually missing the filling on its tail only displaying the outlining. Im far from graduating and am still a beginner and most likely am completely wrong!
    What do you think? What would you Grade and/or Value? https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/00cbcad2ee0a55bc66ee1cb5f94aaaf24fb6e0b3fa5afdccdb351cbe8209d4f4.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4dd234278106134d1fa63eb7e03c255c17bfddde1aa7fa8bcc68c05d2fbc5b83.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d8c8878e77d9466031ba31f8074e57253b50bb0564741e3f1c3650f04d6cb1c6.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d43e0e14afffba2b0ef8a1a656f823ca6a708d517549f087396efb8cff45a9bf.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/82092bea3b715fccd8e2dd5faa4f9f718e774f4921ef127c4b02bffc3e012a87.jpg

    Reply
    • Hello, Lady —

      I do see an anomaly, especially with the reverse R in DOLLAR. I think it might be a die crack of some sort, but I really don’t want to say for certain without getting a better look. I wouldn’t want to get your hopes up, but this may be something worth looking into further. My two suggestions are sending it in for review by die variety expert John Wexler or having it certified by a third-party coin grading firm.

      Here’s the link for Wexler: https://doubleddie.com/
      Here’s more info on the various major coin certification services: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

      Very perceptive find and good luck!

      Thank you for your question and images,
      Josh

      Reply
  115. Hey Josh,

    Silly question on my part. I just started collecting coins and bought (didn’t pay a lot) these 2 “cancelled” and 1 “error” items. They have been slabbed by PCGS or NGC, however, I cannot find values on these type of coins. I can find dozens of errors or issues but not these specific error and issues, nor can I find values in the redbook, bluebook or any other location for them. Can you offer a location where I might find a value or even a roundabout value at least? Any information would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d36850524211a44692c2a97f72d0aba8bc35209ea50b23d48774065ffa52ec8c.jpg

    Reply
    • Hi, Richard —

      Ooh, the top two are waffled coins — coins the U.S. Mint identified as defective and thus destroyed by waffling them. The bottom is a bowtie clip — the piece of metal left after the round coin blanks are cut from a sheet of coin metal. Waffled coin errors tend to be worth around $25. Bowtie clip errors are a little more unusual. I’ve seen values range from $35 to $100 or more.

      Cool pieces!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Lu —

      Prior to 1968, regular-issue proof Lincoln cents such as yours were made at the Philadelphia Mint, and these do not contain a mintmark.

      By the way, that’s a neat find you made!
      -Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Keith!

      Thank you for your Christmas wishes! I hope you also had a good one!

      It looks like the 1967 Washington quarter sustained some post-mint damage, but the 1968-D Lincoln cent is worth keeping. It is worth at least two cents for its copper value. I’ve been keeping all of my pre-1982 copper cents, too.

      Happy New Year!
      Josh

      Reply
  116. Joshua, I have a 1969 Kennedy half dollar that appears to be hollow. The eagle side is not completely sealed at the rim and it sounds like a dud when it drops – not like a coin but more like a poker chip – which is how I originally discovered it. Could this be a mint error? Thanks.

    Reply
    • Hi, Jean —

      Would you please upload an image of this 1969 half dollar? It may have been converted over to jewelry perhaps as a locket or may have had other uses that I could tell upon seeing the coin.

      Neat find!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Jean —

      Based on what I see, there isn’t any apparent (in the photo, anyway) seal missing. The edge looks normal, as does the eagle design. The relief, or height, of the eagle design is normally pretty thick on 1969 Kennedy half dollars, and thus why it appears to have an edge. As for the sound the coin makes when it drops, I can’t say for sure without hearing it rather or not it is a normal tone.

      I should tell you your Kennedy half dollar has a 40% silver composition and is worth about $3 to $4 given current bullion values.

      Thank you for your question and photos!

      Cheers,
      Josh

      Reply
  117. State quarter struck hard on back circle shows through on front as if it almost popped the center of the coin out. Error? Any value?

    Reply
  118. I found a 2001 Massachusetts quarter which has raised spots front and back.they are offset from each other and there is not a dent on the reverse side to explain the raised spots.the face of the coin has the most interesting feature as it occurred on Washington’s mouth and nose without obscuring the features.
    Haven’t seen anything on this and have looked around without goingvto a coin shop.
    Would like to hear your thoughts https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/17c4b4dd42d1cb62742076562f0189dedf5088a68172ec89dda038315a488d3c.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/2c23ac7689fc0ede31eddc41e6c34102e698a003b5820a756bae02483fc98104.jpg

    Reply