U.S. Coins Worth More Than Face Value: A List Of The Most Valuable Coins You Should Be Saving In All Denominations

This post may contain affiliate links. If you buy thru these links, we may earn a commission at no additional cost to you.


You probably have some coins that are worth more than face value in your pocket change or coin jar right now.

In fact, many old valuable coins are still in circulation today — so your chances of finding them in your everyday change are quite good!

Here’s a list of all U.S. coins in circulation right now!

If you’re wondering which ones to keep and which ones to spend — I’m going to show you specifically which pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters, half dollars, and dollar coins are worth more than face value and worth holding onto!

U.S. Coins Worth More Than Face Value

This is the ultimate guide to U.S. coins that you definitely want to save… not spend. (There are so many that I’ve included each denomination in a separate article.)

Here's a list of valuable U.S. pennies worth more than face value that you can find in pocket change!

Most Valuable Pennies

A list of the most valuable pennies that you should be looking for in your pocket change. These 43 pennies commonly found in circulation are worth 100 times their face value: $1 or more… each!

See which pennies you should be looking for…

Here's a list of valuable U.S. nickels worth more than face value that you can find in your spare change!

Most Valuable Nickels

These silver nickels, Buffalo nickels, and other old nickels are the ones you want to save. Check out this list of the most valuable nickels, along with their current values. They’re worth at least 4 times face value: 20 cents apiece!

See which nickels you should be looking for…

Here's a list of valuable U.S. dimes worth more than face value that you can find in loose change!

Most Valuable Dimes

Old dimes can easily be found in circulation today. Here’s a list of silver dimes and other valuable old dimes to look for, along with their current values. These dimes are all worth at least 15 times face value: $1.50 each!

See which dimes you should be looking for…

Here's a list of valuable U.S. quarters worth more than face value that you can find in pocket change!

Most Valuable Quarters

Yes, you can find silver quarters and other rare quarters in your pocket change. These are the most valuable quarters you should be looking for. They’re worth at least 15 times face value: $3.75 or more apiece!

See which quarters you should be looking for…

Here's a list of valuable U.S. half dollars worth more than face value that you can find in your spare change!

Most Valuable Half Dollars

Silver half dollars (1970 and earlier) are valuable for their silver content alone. See which Kennedy half dollars — and others — you should be looking for, along with their current values. The half dollars listed here are worth at least 5 times face value… $2.75 each! (Most are worth so much more than that!)

See which half dollars you should be looking for…

Here's a list of valuable U.S. dollar coins worth more than face value that you can find in your pocket change!

Most Valuable Silver Dollars

A list of the most valuable silver dollars — including Morgan dollars, Peace dollars, and Eisenhower dollars. The silver dollars listed here are are worth at least 15 times face value: $15 apiece!

See which silver dollars you should be looking for…

Find Out More About Your U.S. Coins

Sorting U.S. coins.

In addition to the articles for each denomination that I’ve included above, here are some of our other articles that will help you find the value of your old U.S. coins:

Like this post? Save it to read again later… or share with others on Pinterest!

Valuable U.S. coins that you can find in spare change!

Don’t miss our latest tips!

Stay up to date with everything about U.S Coins

We don’t spam! Read more in our privacy policy

54 thoughts on “U.S. Coins Worth More Than Face Value: A List Of The Most Valuable Coins You Should Be Saving In All Denominations”

  1. Hi, I have a 1922 penny, and I think it is a plain cent. Could you tell me what you think this is, and what it is worth. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Hi, Connor —

      There are several different die pairs for the 1922-D/1922 penny, and it looks like you MAY have Die Pair #4, though I can’t verify for sure without magnification, though your photos are very good and helped me rule out a few of the other die pairings.

      The value of a 1922 Weak D cent is about $30.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  2. Hi, I have a few coins of British india Rupee ( Victoria Queen 1840) some 1862 1903 1905 1907 1912 1913 and some are dirty can I clean with baking soda and how can I sell? Thanks

    Reply
  3. Hi, Angel —

    The circular groove is post-mint damage caused, perhaps, by another coin (possibly a nickel as you keenly stated) being forced upon this coin. There are a number of ways such damage could have occurred, but at any rate this piece is worth face value.

    Thank you for your question!
    Josh

    Reply
  4. Hey Joshua I have one silver Elizabeth 2 1972 Canada coin, then 2 bronze Elizabeth 2 Canada coins one 1962 the other 1968. I also have 2 bronze wheat pennies one 1956 the other 1934 I was wondering the worth?

    Reply
    • Hello, Holly!

      Would you mind providing a little more info on the Canadian coins, please? What are their denominations? Photos help, too, if that’s easier for you!

      Meanwhile, the 1934 Lincoln wheat cent is worth 10 cents and the 1956 is valued at 5 cents, assuming both have typical amounts of wear for their ages.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  5. Hi, Holly!

    Thank you for these great images. The 1968 and 1969 Canadian one-cent coins are technically worth less than one-cent USD here, but US collectors often pay 5 to 10 cents each for common, worn Canadian pennies for their novelty.

    The 1972 Canadian dime, meanwhile, is similarly worth barely face value here in the US but would trade for 15 to 20 cents in the foreign coin market.

    Best,
    Josh

    Reply
      • Hello, GonZalo —

        Unless you have a 1969-S doubled die cent, your piece, if circulated is generally worth 2 cents for its copper value. I’d be glad to double-check your coin for any apparent errors or varieties if you kindly upload an image of that coin here to the comments forum!

        Thank you,
        Josh

        Reply
    • Hi, Mr. X —

      It’s selling for such a high price because it is one of the finest examples of its date (1971) and mint (San Francisco — denoted by the coin’s “S” mintmark). While it may look just like any other shiny penny, under magnification one would fine very few marks and abrasions, which are common to virtually all coins intended for circulation, such as this coin.

      Coins are graded on a numerical scale ranging from 1 (poor) to 70 (numismatically perfect). Note this coin is a 67 — extremely high for a business-strike Lincoln cent. In fact, the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC), which graded this coin, has certified only 30 1971-S Lincoln cents in Mint State 67, with none grading higher. The Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) — the other major coin grading firm, has graded only 25 1971-S Lincoln cents MS-67, with none grading higher. In other words, of the 525.1 million 1971-S Lincoln cents in existence, less than 60 have been graded by the two major coin grading firms in MS-67. Surely there are others out there, but we can assume this number to be a mere fraction of the entire population.

      So, as you might now realize, this perhaps ordinary-looking 1971-S Lincoln cent is actually rare – – it’s what we’d call a conditional rarity; the date is common, yes, but it’s rare in such a high grade.

      Here are some links you might find interesting:

      43 Most Valuable Pennies To Look For: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/valuable-pennies/
      Facts on Certified Coins: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/
      What Are Supergrade Coins? https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/super-grade-coins/

      Thank you for your question,
      Josh

      Reply
  6. Hi Joshua. My question is there other way to tell the difference between small dates an large dates .there is high 7, low 7, s . I know you had said about the numbers slinging, on this they seem to be in line on top. My book only has a couple pic. Of what to look for is there a link or something you can suggest to help me in this . .. Thanks Till next time ..

    Reply
    • Hi, Dres —

      This appears to be a 1970-S large date cent, which is worth 2 cents in a worn state such as this.

      Thank you for your question and photo!
      Josh

      Reply
  7. Hi josh my name is caden and I am 13. I am very interested in coins I would like to know more about coins that could be sitting in your pocket change.

    Reply
    • Hello, Caden!

      It’s good to meet you. Articles like this one that explain which coins are worth more than face value can definitely help you in building a base of knowledge so you can become a better coin collector. I was about your age when I first got involved in coin collecting and have loved the hobby ever since.

      I wish you all the best in your coin collecting pursuits! If you have any more questions about coins, please feel free to check out more of the coin articles here at TheFunTimesGuide.com or ask questions here. I’ll be glad to assist the best I can!

      Happy collecting!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Dada —

      This looks like a circulated, regular-strike 1983-D Jefferson nickel. Unless it has some type of error or die variety that I don’t see in this image, it’s worth 5 cents.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Kimberly —

      Looks like a normal, circulated 1969-S Lincoln cent in this image, but it’s worth about two cents for its copper value!

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi Kimberly,

      I’m afraid these are all the regular strikes… Do you have a 5x loupe? I think if you get one it might really help you Inc your searches for varieties. My loupe is a lifesaver for me anyway!

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Angela!

      These are all worth face value and are safe to spend at face value…

      Thank you for reaching out,
      Josh

      Reply

Leave a Comment