Most Valuable Pennies: A List Of 43 U.S. Pennies Worth Holding Onto!


This post may contain affiliate links. If you purchase through these links, we may earn a small commission at no additional cost to yourself.


Wondering which pennies are worth more than face value? And which pennies you should be holding onto, rather than spending?

Well here you go — a list of the most valuable pennies, each worth more than $1 apiece!

Use this cheat sheet to see which pennies are worth saving and which ones are worth spending…

Which Lincoln Pennies To Keep

Of all the coins ever made by the United States Mint since 1793, arguably the most popular and widely collected among them are Lincoln pennies.

The Lincoln cent (technically, only Great Britain officially has a denomination called the “penny”) is a favorite among collectors young and old, rich and poor. It’s also one of my favorite coins!

Lincoln pennies are the first coins I ever collected when I initially charted my path in the hobby back in 1992, and it’s by far the coin series I’m most often asked about from readers here at The Fun Times Guide.

If you want to know what your U.S. penny is worth, then read on!

Here are the most important types of Lincoln pennies you should be keeping:

43 Most Valuable Pennies — By Date

So now that you have a good idea of which types of pennies to keep, you’re probably wondering about specific dates.

Well, here’s a cheat sheet of the most valuable pennies to keep. Get ready… it’s a long list!

The penny dates listed below are worth more than just a few cents (unlike most of the ones referenced above).

These are the rarest and most valuable pennies that are worth more than $1 apiece:

  • 1909 — $3 and up
  • 1909 VDB — $10 and up
  • 1909-S — $85 and up
  • 1909-S VDB — $750 and up
  • 1910-S – $15
  • 1911-D – $5
  • 1911-S – $40
  • 1912 – $1
  • 1912-D – $6
  • 1912-S – $20
  • 1913-D – $3
  • 1913-S – $12
  • 1914-D – $175
  • 1914-S – $20
  • 1915 – $1.50
  • 1915-D – $2
  • 1915-S – $20
  • 1916-D – $1
  • 1916-S – $1.50
  • 1921-S – $1
  • 1922-D – $15
  • 1922 plain – $650
  • 1923-S – $2
  • 1924-D – $30
  • 1924-S – $1
  • 1926-S – $5
  • 1931-D – $4
  • 1931-S – $100
  • 1932 – $1.50
  • 1932-D – $1
  • 1933 – $1
  • 1933-D – $2
  • 1943-D boldly doubled mintmark – $10
  • 1944 D/S – $125
  • 1946-S/D – $35
  • 1955 doubled die, obverse — $1,200
  • 1970-S small date – $30
  • 1972 doubled die – $300
  • 1983 doubled die – $250
  • 1984 doubled die – $200
  • 1992-D close “AM” – $500
  • 1995 doubled die – $25
  • 1999 wide “AM” – $500

*Values are for problem-free coins in a grade of Good or better, and uncirculated for those dated 1959 and later.

As you’ll notice, there are several dates missing in the list above.

The pennies that aren’t on this list are worth only a nominal amount — usually between 3 cents and $1.

The list above also doesn’t include proof Lincoln cents — which you wouldn’t ordinarily find in circulation.

Must read: How To Determine The Grade Of A Coin

Other Valuable Pennies Worth Money

In addition to the pennies mentioned above, here are some other pennies worth money:

And here’s my video explaining how to tell if you’ve got a valuable penny or not:

4 Places To Find Rare & Valuable Pennies

Do you know where to look for the most valuable pennies?

Here are 4 of the best places to find rare pennies:

  1. In rolls of coinsRoll hunting is one of the best ways to find old coins, and sometimes the pieces you’ll find are quite valuable. I’ve found many old and obsolete coins by searching for them in rolls of coins.
  2. At yard sales and flea markets – Many people have no idea which coins are rare and they often end up selling them unwittingly in a rummage sale or flea market. You’ll be surprised how many bargains will be found at both yard sales and flea markets. Just be sure what you’re buying is authentic!
  3. In a family heirloom chest – Sometimes rare coins are already in the family, and may be tucked away in an old chest or another safe location. Attics and basements hold troves of valuable estate coins, often unbeknownst to the current occupants of the home.
  4. In your pocket changeRare pennies do still turn up in circulation, though you’ll need a keen eye and a good deal of patience to find them this way. Good luck!

Read next: Most Valuable Nickels – A List Of Silver Nickels, Buffalo Nickels & Old Nickels Worth Holding Onto!

1,043 thoughts on “Most Valuable Pennies: A List Of 43 U.S. Pennies Worth Holding Onto!”

  1. i found a 1967 s series penny. i heard that this particular penny is very valuable, is it true or is it just wishfull thinking?

    Reply
    • Hello, Cassie —

      1967 Lincoln cents were made without any mintmarks, so it’s possible your coin may have been counterstamped (imprinted) by somebody outside of the mint. Would you please share a photo of your coin so I can determine what you have?

      Thanks!

      Reply
  2. I have a 1776 Centennial Curency pewter coin How do I find out if it is real. An elderly man who died had it. He was an influential man.

    Reply
    • The only reason to hold these coins is that they contain 95% copper and are worth about 1.7 cents each at current retail prices. BUT … It’s illegal to melt and sell pennies, and even if you could you would receive the metal’s wholesale price which is a lot lower.

      Reply
    • Hello, Bob —

      The CoinTrackers site is talking about a very select few 2007 Lincoln cents, though I don’t feel they are saying this very clearly because a lot of people will see $1,300 for a 2007 cent and assume THEIR certified (or slabbed) 2007 cent is worth that much.

      What should be said about the value of 2007 cents is that worn versions are worth face value (1 cent). Most uncirculated specimens have a value between 10 cents and $1, with pristine examples worth more. I suspect the $1,300 value would likely apply to a 2007 cent grading MS 70, which is numismatically perfect. To my knowledge, there are perhaps 4 or so such graded coins out there.

      I hope this clarifies the matter better!
      Joshua @ TheFunTimesGuide

      Reply
    • Hi, Destini —

      You have a 1943 steel cent? Your coin, if worn, is worth 10 to 25 cents.

      Thanks for your question,
      Josh @ TheFunTimesGuide

      Reply
    • Hi, Amanda –

      The 1980 Lincoln cent is worth about 2 cents due to its copper value. Heads up, be sure to keep all pre-1982 Lincoln cents, as their copper value is currently worth about twice face value. Caveat — it’s illegal to melt pennies for their copper value, but many people are holding these coins aside anyway in case the laws change.

      Here’s some more info about old copper Lincoln cents:

      https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/copper-pennies/

      Reply
  3. How about a 1858 or may say 1853 cant make it out. Has a eagle on one side and a wheat picture with ine cent on the other

    Reply
    • Hi, Patricio —

      You have an 1858 Flying Eagle cent. Based on its condition, the value would range from roughly $3 in well worn, damaged condition into the hundreds for a nice, lightly circulated specimen. I suspect if you’re having a difficult time reading the date the coin may have lightly damaged (maybe porous) surfaces, so I think it might be worth closer to the lower value I suggested than the higher.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  4. I have a question. Example: When i research about the 1944 D penny in any other website, it says it’s worth $6. Why is that?

    Reply
    • Hi, Ben —

      I’m not sure what any other website is, as I’ve seen all types of prices for the 1944-D. One site, for example, tends to use a so-called “perfect” grade (which technically isn’t even the noted adjective of any coin grade) to describe the value of its coins. The $6 value refers to a very well-preserved uncirculated specimen, which is not one anyone will find in pocket change.

      The 5 to 10 cent value is an accurate appraisal of a 1944-D Lincoln cent that is very well worn and displays its usual brown color. (Note — cleaning coins cuts their value in half or more, so making it look lighter will not increase its value in any way!).

      I hope this helps explain some of the factors that go into the coin values listed here at TheFunTimesGuide.

      Please feel free to ask any other questions about coins you may have!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  5. I have a double die 1989 penny and several 1987 . were these bad years? So many errors. 1989 is my concern all of back has errors.

    Reply
    • Hi, Wanda —

      Would you please post photos of the coins you have that appear to have errors?

      Thanks!
      Josh

      Reply
  6. I have a 1990 Lincoln penny an it doesn’t have a “S” or “D” mint mark. …would you know if it’s worth anything. ..

    Reply
    • A 1990 cent would be made of copper-plated zinc so it’s only worth face value.

      The only 1990-S cents made were proof coins sold to collectors. If you had for done in change it might be worth a few cents as a curiosity but proof coins are generally collectible only in they’re in their sealed packaging.

      Reply
  7. what should you do if your wheat penny has bronze disease or verdigris? i realize that cleaning it will devalue it, but leaving it will cause further damage and also spread to other coins.

    Reply
    • Hi, Abigail —

      That’s unfortunately a really tricky spot to be in. Acetone, which I recommend using very carefully and in a well-ventilated location, is the most conservative route to go. After that, there’s a product called Biox that I haven’t personally used but have heard can remove verdigris; again, I can’t attest to the efficacy of this product, but I know it’s an idea: https://www.dirtyoldcoins.com

      Unfortunately, verdigris is a byproduct of a chemical reaction with the copper itself, and it can spread to other coins. So, I’d definitely make sure you divide any coins with verdigris from those that are still apparently unaffected.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  8. 6 coins to talk about…. First a 1952 d penny, 1962 d nickel, 1968 d penny, 1996 urraca penny, 1970 s penny, and a 1937 plain wheat penny

    Reply
    • Hi, Sabbir —

      Here are approximate values for your coins, assuming they are worn and are not errors or die varieties:

      *1937 Lincoln cent – 5 to 10 cents
      *1952-D Lincoln cent – 3 to 5 cents
      *1968-D Lincoln cent – 2 cents
      *1970-S penny – 2 cents (if large date), $15 (if small date)
      *1996 Lincoln cent – 1 cent
      *1962-D Jefferson nickel – 5 cents

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  9. I was helping my mother-in-law go through some coins and I came across this 1931 cent with an odd thing in place of the “1” in “19”. I tried to take a picture of it, but the preview looks pretty small. i don’t know to make it bigger. hopefully it will post bigger and you all can see it. any one have an idea what it is?

    Reply
    • Hi,

      I can’t tell for certain without getting a really close look at that first “1” in the date, but it appears this coin MAY have been manipulated or altered in some way outside of the U.S. Mint. A closer image on that part of the coin, if possible please, may help me ascertain precisely what is going on.

      Nice catch on the date,
      Josh

      Reply
  10. Hey Josh, my names Leslie. Do you buy coins with errors or are you just here advising? I have a few coins, if your interested. How can you tell a double die coin?

    Reply
    • What you may have is a “flipover” strike. That happens when a coin doesn’t eject from the press but instead turns over in place and is struck a second dime by the opposite die. However without a picture or in-person inspection it’s difficult to be more specific.

      P.S. It’s the Lincoln Memorial rather than the Capitol. 🙂

      Reply
      • Dale, actually the Capitol DOES appear on the 2009 Lincoln Bicentennial cent — the fourth and final commemorative reverse design released for one-cent coins during that year. If you don’t mind, sir, please upload a photo of your coin so that I may see what might be going on with your coin.

        Thank you!
        Josh

        Reply
        • Mea culpa, I should have given a more-detailed response.

          My assumption was based on the fact that Bicentennial cents are uncommon in circulation, combined with the number of times I’ve encountered people who aren’t familiar with what building is on the back of standard Lincoln Memorial cents.

          Reply
  11. Hello my name is Rachel. I think I may have quite a few error coins in a collection of old and new coins my dad gave me. Im new at coin collecting it has become a fascination with me I hope to learn a lot about the history of them. I have many that I’d love for you to look at…but for now ill mention 2 that are odd
    * 1974 d Lincoln penny all looks good but it has the face of JFK facing Lincoln.
    * 2013 Lincoln penny, Every time I look at it I see more it seems. I know for a fact the face of Washington, and Jefferson along with a extra Lincoln face are on this coin . I’m pretty sure I can see part of JFK face as well. It looks as if someone is scrap booking . Because the extra faces look holographic and the Washington I can see his eyes and top of his head , they are on the side of Lincoln s face….??? 🙂 can u tell me if they are worth saving please or just sell them?

    Reply
    • Hi, Rachel!

      Welcome to the hobby! It sounds like you have a lot of neat coins on your hands and thank you for checking with us about them. The two coins you mention are called novelty coins, as they are real coins that have had post-mint work done to them.

      The 1974 cent is one of the more “common” types of novelty cents and was sold as a “Lincoln-Kennedy” tribute coin. Here’s some more info about it: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/lincoln_kennedy/

      The 2013 sounds like a modern colorized coin.

      While the coins are technically considered “altered” or “damaged” by die-hard numismatists, they still have a bit of value to those who collect novelty coins. I’d put the values at around 25 cents to 50 cents.

      Please feel free to ask any other coin questions you may have!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • My wheat penny collection has grown… do u know where do I sell some of my wheat pennies. I want to buy more coins I’ve seen but also I don’t know where to buy from that won’t take advantage of me being a beginner at collecting coins.

        Reply
    • Hi, Saul —

      I think the coin you’re uncertain about is the top one, which is a 1951-S. That’s worth 3 to 5 cents in that grade. The other coins are worth face value, but I would hang onto the 1978-D Lincoln cent for its intrinsic copper value, which is worth approximately double the coin’s face value.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  12. HI, my name is diamond and I have a 1999 wide “AM” penny but it has a D below the date. Is this still worth $500 as indicated above? If so is there any way I can cash it in or do I just hold on to it?

    Reply
    • Hi, Diamond —

      There are no known 1999-D Wide AM cents… Would you mind posting a photo so I can see what might be going on with the reverse side of your Lincoln cent?

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
  13. Hi! I have a 1979 Lincoln penny that where the “D” mint mark is, it is filled in the center of the “D” so it kinda just looks like a dot. Does this anomaly make the penny worth more?

    Reply
  14. I have a 1965-1968 Washington Quarters nd some
    1965-1967 dimes nd a

    1910S /1944D nd 1951D nd 1959D /1961D/1962D/1963D 1964D 1968D 1969D penny

    1941D 1960D 1962D 1964 1964D 1968D 1969S nickel nd hv a lot more

    Reply
    • Hello, David —

      Yes, that is correct, though an approximation of value; your individual piece may be worth more or less based on wear, surface condition, and other overall grading factors.

      Cheers,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Edwin —

      A 1969 Lincoln cent is worth at least 2 cents for its intrinsic copper value; a piece in mint condition is worth about 10 cents and up.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, David —

      What were you researching about these coins? It sounds like something that you believe might make them worth a lot of money?

      As for grading and providing other information about these coins, it’s always really helpful for me to see both the obverse (heads side), as well as the reverse (tails side), the latter of which you kindly display here. As for grading, the Lincoln cents appear to be in Extremely Fine-40 to About Uncirculated-50 grade, and the Jefferson nickel looks to grade around Very Fine-20. These appear to be fairly recent dates (made within the last 50 years), and unless they contain a rare die variety (which I don’t see at this point looking at only the reverse side of these coins), they would be worth face value if worn.

      All the best!
      Josh

      Reply
      • I’m sorry Josh I meant 2007 and 2007 D on them pennies and the nickel was in the 25 category on the nickels worth

        David Neilson

        Reply
  15. hi josh, i have another penny i would like to find out about please it is a 1969 d penny it appears to have a floating roof, but that is one of many odd bits about this coin. my question is do you think these are mint errors or post mint damage? i am pretty sure the floating roof thing is a mint error but the rest?

    Reply
    • Hello, Rhonda!

      Well, it looks like this 1969-D Lincoln cent has led a pretty tough 46 years. The roof the Lincoln Memorial does appear a little different than on most other Lincoln cents I’ve seen, though judging by the gouges and pits elsewhere on the coin, I believe this effect may be a byproduct of the damage, or perhaps caused by damage to the coin in those areas. Most compelling to this aspect is the gouge at the top of the two rightmost columns, and the slash across the fifth column from the left.

      While the coin is worth face value, I think this penny could tell a tale worth more than one cent if it could talk!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • i thank you for your reply. now might be a good time to ask: is there some sort of guideline i could employ to determine whether damage to a coin is mint or post mint?

        thank you again for your valuable time and opinion.

        Reply
      • I placed it on a mayonnaise jar top
        and stood it on it’s side.

        So you can see it is not a worn down e
        But and I or almost like boot.

        Reply
        • Hi,

          I would agree that the faded appearance is likely a die strike weakness and not merely due to circulation wear alone. So, yes, it is essentially a Mint defect, but unfortunately not one worth any premium at this point. My best advice at this time is to hold onto your coin, as its value may increase down the road.

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
          • I hope that it can be premium
            but if you saw it in person or i had a better camera
            it is the shape of a boot
            I think I can auction it off as Lincoln boot penny

            I also have two other rare pennies you have on your list.
            i enjoy collecting but i am not particularly into defects

    • Hi,

      The obverse photo is great but the reverse image is unfortunately a little blurry on my end to tell the distance of the “AM” in “AMERICA.”

      If you wouldn’t mind trying to retake the reverse image and uploading the mulligan shot, I would greatly appreciate it!

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
          • Hi!

            OK, it looks like you have a “Wide AM,” which on a 1992-D cent is a common variety worth face value if worn. The “Close AM” 1992-D cents, meanwhile, are worth about $25 and up.

            Best,
            Josh

  16. I have 9 wheat pennies which include 1940, two 1944’s, 1946, 1948, 1952, 1953, 1956, and a 1958 what could be there values??? and i have two 2009 bicentennial of formative years that never been touched (perfect condition) could you please tell me some values?

    Reply
    • Hi, Book –

      All the Lincoln wheat cents you mention are worth 3 to 5 cents each in typical worn condition, while Mint State 2009 Lincoln Bicentennial cents are worth around 10 cents each in standard uncirculated condition. Exceptional pieces are worth anywhere from $1 and up.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  17. I have a penny where Lincoln is reading on the back. Front is faded, so don’t know the date. Is there any value to this penny Josh?

    Thx

    Reply
  18. Hi Joshua I’m sendin this to ya to get your honest opinion. I’ve found this 1988 quarter that has a few issues resulting from the factory press. What it looks like it has bubbles on each opposite sides, as if someone shoot it with abullet on both opposite sides. This quarter also has a small piece of metal still attached to the rim. It has been around in circulation for sometime and not that of a collector. I would like to know if it is worth anything, if so to whom may I contact to sell or if it is just face value. I’ve enclosed a few pics and if at all a possible video clip. Can’t wait to hear from ya. Sincerely, A Novice Collect Sherry Lantrip

    Reply
    • Hi, Sherry –

      Thank you for submitting the fantastic photos. Given the overall appearance of the coin, my thinking is that this coin was exposed to intense heat, causing the internal copper and nickel cladding to expand and separate, thus causing the bubble.

      While this coin is not worth any extra money, I hope this answer nevertheless helps solves the mystery! Keep on checking your change — there are so many interesting coins in circulation.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Hey buddy, I have almost the complete 1941-1974 collection including a 1940 wheat reverse. I don’t care to sell I just figured you might be interested in knowing you have a mutual enthusiast in collecting. If your interested in seeing any pics of any of my coins, feel free to shoot me an email. My email address is [email protected]
        I look forward to hearing your thoughts. Their value in money is of little interest to me as I have ZERO interest in ever selling such a collection as I have. My name is James by the way.

        Reply
        • Hi, James!

          It’s great to hear from you. The 1941-1974 Lincoln cent collection is one of my favorites. Thank you for introducing yourself and for checking out The Fun Times Guide to Coins!

          Please feel free to post any coin photos or ask numismatic questions here whenever you wish!

          Cheers,
          Josh

          Reply
          • I wouldn’t mind a little help building my collection and completing my 1941-1974 collection. Any way you can point me in the direction on where to get the rest?? I own the 1943 wheat penny as well. As you know, a very desirable coin. Unfortunately I do not currently have it in my possession, but when I get it from my holder, I can send pictures.

    • Hi, Rhonda —

      This appears to be either a minor die chip or perhaps a “strikethrough” error (caused when a piece of debris lands on the die that imprints designs on blank coins). Such a piece may fetch $1 to $2 from a die variety collector.

      Nice find!
      Josh

      Reply
  19. 1921 wheat cent with mark on center reverse. I think it resembles an S. The obverse looks normal (not bent like if it had been punched buy something)

    Reply
  20. I received change today from a transaction at a store. I have been collecting coins for fun for several years now and have several with errors. Today I received a 1975 Dime with no mint Mark. While I’m aware these were very rare a few years back, are they more common now or should I have it checked out? Also, any knowledge on 20.00 coins minted in 1812? Unable to find anything on this coin from my parents collection.
    Thanks and look forward to your response.

    Reply
    • Hello, Rhonda —

      You have a 1975 Roosevelt dime minted at the Philadelphia Mint; the Philly Mint did not place a “P” mintmark on dimes until 1980. In worn condition, as yours is in, these pieces are worth face value.

      As for the 1812 $20 coin you’re asking about, I’m not exactly sure what you have as the first official U.S. Mint $20 gold double eagle coins were not struck as patterns (just one made) until 1849 and released for circulation until 1850.

      Would you mind posting a photo of the 1812 coins?

      If you’re working a cash register, you must come across some pretty interesting coins just about every day! I suggest you check out this list of U.S. coins worth more than face value; perhaps you’d be allowed to switch out same-denomination coins?

      U.S. Coins Worth More Than Face Value: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/us-coins/

      All the best,
      Josh

      Reply
  21. curious to see what my wheat penny is worth, 1919 s penny. i can see detail in his hair, and the back of the coin i can see the feather and lines very clear, does not have much wear that noticable. can anyone help? thank you.

    Reply
  22. I have a 1919 s wheat penny. Lincoln’s hair is very detailed still and the back of the penny has almost flawless detail in the feathers and lines. curious if its worth anything, thank you!

    Reply
    • Hi, Albert!

      This is a fairly well-preserved circulated 1919-S Lincoln cent! I would suggest that it is worth somewhere between 25 cents and 75 cents.

      Great find!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Shane —

      I think there may be something I’m missing from your question/comment; you mentioned the list in this article. If you’re looking for the value of this gorgeous uncirculated 1944-D Lincoln cent, I’d put it at around $1 to $2.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  23. I have a lot of pennies from 1920 to 1980s,large amount are from 1940s i wanted to know if there are any worth looking for, dont really want to part with them for a couple cents more, but is there anything worth more. anything you recommend i keep or get rid of.

    Reply
  24. Hello! I pick up a lot of coins from off the street, and am thinking of going through them to see if I find anything of value. A couple years ago I found an Indian penny from 1909, but it’s in pretty bad shape and so probably doesn’t have much value. If I do find something that isn’t too beaten up, where could I possibly go to sell them? Thank you!

    Reply
  25. I have one of “those” pennies. A so called, silver penny. I have performed and evaluated what we call NDE or non destructive examination. Things like X-ray, UT (ultrasonic thickness testing), PT (or DPT dye-penatrent testing, and one of my favorites, PMI (positive material identification). Lots of neat little things that keep critcal welding applications in order. You can look at 316 SS pipe fitting and see the 316 stamp but how do you know? It may be a lower grade like 304, 308 or 347 which is good but it changes what you fuse it with and can ultimately prevent failure. I say that to say this. The PMI “gun” I refered to would tell me the exact percentage of the pennies composition per the periodical table of elements. Cu, Zn, So, Ni or whatever but I am retired and no longer have access to it so I leave it to you. I am in including a few photos and have many more. It’s a 1976D. It’s unmolested counterpart is also a 1976D. I have pictures of it side by side with a 1943 which has lost it’s copper coat and a 1943S with most of the coat intact. It weighs 3.08 grams (the “silver” one) its accomplice weighs exactly 3.11. They are both in very good condition and I doubt the .03 is due to wear. One other thing. The planchet is off close to 10 degrees from obverse to reverse. It can be seen by clamping the Montecello level in a vise and looking at the obverse. Liberty, Lincoln and the date are off by quite a bit and Liberty looks very slopy and is not on the same plane as the date. I’m pretty sure we can rule out a dime by the weight and appearance and a nickle by the weight and thickness. It’s possibly plated but weighs less than a normal one. As I said, the condition is very good and wear does not appear to have had any affect. So if it’s plated, especially with mercury, I would expect an increase in weight if any change at all. My scales are accurate to + or – .01 grams. What do you think? I put several examples of copper shade variations because depending where it comes from the color changes a little. Hence the “red cent”. Thank you,
    Mark

    Reply
      • Hi, Mark —

        Based on the photos, it appears the coin was chemically discolored before it wound up in your hands. While I can’t see your coin in person, I have seen others like this and that is what the testing indicates. Actually, this piece looks normal in terms of design; LIBERTY and the date aren’t supposed to be on the same plane on the Lincoln cent. As for the 10 percent die rotation, that isn’t particularly unusual and seems to be within tolerance for that era.

        As for the 1943 cents, they don’t have a copper coat, but rather have steel cores coated with a thin plating of zinc. Where the zinc coating comes off is where rust often forms on the exposed steel — a brownish color that may have the appearance of copper.

        Ultimately, if you want to have the 1976 cent coin tested by a third-party coin grading company, by all means do so. However, I am pretty confident, based on the information and the photos, that the coin’s metallic appearance was lightened by chemicals.

        An interesting anecdote here is the 1981 Philadelphia cent — millions of those blank planchets were washed by a detergent at the Mint, giving them a light, dull appearance that under certain lighting may look silvery. Yet on the metallic level they are every bit a “normal” bronze Lincoln cent.

        I hope this provides at the very least some insight.

        Best,
        Josh

        Reply
    • Hello, Mark –

      It sounds like you did some extensive testing on this to say the least. Indeed, the photos would help, and I’d be curious about the strike quality, etc. — strike quality and appearance will tell me several things, including if the coin may have in fact been manipulated in some way (plating still comes to mind), or — perhaps — is a counterfeit; such pieces are notorious for strike/quality issues.

      I look forward to seeing photos and hopefully providing more substantive insight or opinions.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Monique!

      Nice 1862 Indian Head cent! Your piece appears to be worth $15 to $20. I can’t tell if it has been cleaned; if it has been, its value would be closer to about $5 to $8.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  26. Hello, Love the site, I started going through BOXES of pennies from my grandmother and grandfather. I’ve looked at SO many and I’ve fallen in love with coin hunting again. I just found this one, I’ve never gotten into finding all the “rare” kinds, I only ever picked up and tried to collect one from every year/mint as a kid. Older now, I’ve read a lot more about pennies. Is this a real 1955 double die? I only see extra on the second 5. Everything else looks “normal” to me. Maybe the “W” in we looks off? Just looking for advice. VERY excited to hear what people think!

    Reply
      • Hi there, Rob!

        Whoa, I can definitely see why you hung onto this piece. Unfortunately it is not THE 1955 doubled die, which has doubling visible in all four digits of the date, obverse lettering, etc. However, your piece does appear to be a Poorman’s Doubled Die (caused by machine doubling). Still worth about $1 in most collector circles, it’s well worth hanging onto.

        Wishing you all the best in your collecting ventures! Feel free to post your interesting finds (and coin questions) here!

        Good luck,
        Josh

        P.S. Thank you so much for your kind words and for sharing your numismatic enthusiasm here!

        Reply
  27. Hi Josh, I have a question about a penny I recently came across, it’s a 1979 D with a small extra well, it looks like a small double lobe at the bottom of the ear. Maybe it is a double strike? I can’t find anything about this year/error combination online. Is this a common error? Thanks.

    Reply
    • Hi, Christine —

      I researched several different die variety resources; while I can’t find any attribution for this particular design anomaly, that doesn’t mean it’s not a doubled die. However, given the impression between the “main” lobe and “secondary” lobe,” I’m inclined to think there may be post-mint damage here.

      If you want to make sure, you might consider sending your coin to John Wexler, one of the nation’s foremost experts on doubled dies. For a small fee, he will evaluate any U.S. coins that contain interesting design issues. Perhaps he may be able to help you? Here is his link: https://doubleddie.com/

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
  28. I just tried to get a pic, it’s not really a good photo but I think you can see at the bottom of the ear what I’m trying to explain

    Reply
    • Hi, Jackie –

      This all varies. A regular, worn 1972 Lincoln cent is worth 2 cents for its copper value but more than $150 if it’s a doubled die. I don’t seem to see a photo of this coin attached to the comment, so unfortunately I can’t provide much more detail about the worth of your specific coin.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Jackie —

      It is worth face value if worn and about 10 to 20 cents in uncirculated condition.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  29. I have 7 1944 wheat pennies how do I know their worth and how would I go about selling then if the need ever arose?

    Reply
    • Hi, Bianca —

      Assuming they are worn and have no unusual issues, each of your 1944 Lincoln cents is worth 5 to 10 cents each. If you should decide to sell them, you might try selling them at a local coin dealer or on an auction website such as eBay.

      Here are tips on finding a good coin dealer: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/coin_dealer/

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi,

      What it means is it was struck at the Philadelphia Mint, which did not apply a mintmark to coins in 1940. Your coin, assuming it is worn, is worth about 5 cents.

      Thank you for your question,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Hi, MG —

        Yes, there is some type of chemical damage on the coin, and that is why it is mottled in appearance.

        Best,
        Josh

        Reply
    • Hi, MG —

      A 2013 Lincoln cent without a mintmark was struck at the Philadelphia Mint, which doesn’t place mintmarks on its one-cent coins. Your piece, if it is worn, is worth face value.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Quizie —

      Your 1956-D Lincoln cent is worth 3 to 5 cents in that condition.

      What a great find though! Very hard to find any coins from the 1950s in circulation these days.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Quizie —

      This doesn’t appear to be a proof, and the spread (or lack thereof) between the “A” and “M” in “AMERICA” looks normal for a 1995 cent. The oddity would be if there were more space than usual, resulting in a wide “AM” appearance.

      I hope this helps provide a little info,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Zack —

      Unless it contains a die or design error, a well-worn 1942 Lincoln cent is worth about 5 to 10 cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  30. Hi Joshua
    I have a 1943 steel penny error can u please check it for me and tell me what to do with it thanks.
    I will include some images for to use.

    Reply
    • Hello, Dayan —

      Hmm…. Very interesting indeed. Is that dark D-shaped area raised? Sunken? That’s the first thing I would want to know… It looks like it could may even be a stain, but I don’t want to pass this off without more info. This may be something that die variety expert John Wexler might be interested in verifying. Here is his info: https://doubleddie.com/

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Monica!

      Yes, both of those coins are worth a small premium over face value — 5 to 10 cents each. Even though they may not be worth much monetarily at this point, these coins would make great keepsakes from your grandparents.

      All my best,
      Josh

      Reply
  31. ok . so here is the list of pennys i have , are they worth anything.1990 no mint mark,1983 d , 2 1963 pennys1 d mint 1 no mint,1965 no mint,1980 d penny,1990 no mint mark, 1994 no mintm 1996 no mint, 1985 no mint, , much thanks,

    Reply
    • Hi, Christine —

      Assuming all of these Lincoln cents were found in pocket change and have wear, and also on the assumption none have any errors or other design varieties, only the 1963 and 1965 cents are worth more than face value (2 cents each); the rest are worth face value.

      Thank you for your question!
      Josh

      Reply
  32. Hello, Josh. I have a penny that I am wondering if it is a mint error or if it was most likely “destroyed” by someone. The picture isn’t very good, but it has 2 parallel grooves that come down and wipe out half the date. It only shows “19”. If this is a legitimate error, would it be worth anything? Thank you so much!!! P.S. – it is a wheat penny.

    Reply
  33. Hello Josh, I have a quick question about the 2008 D penny. Is it true that this is quite valuable in mint condition? I was able to get a hold of an original sealed roll of 2008 D…I was wondering if this is a good find. Thanks so much! Wishing you well! April

    Reply
    • Hi, April —

      2008-D Lincoln cents CAN be valuable if they are in top condition — the best of the best mint state grades (MS-67 and above). Otherwise, they are worth face value if worn and between 20 cents and $1 in most lower Mint State grades.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  34. Hi Josh
    I have a 1940 wheat penny with no mint mark and a 1952 wheat penny. Any idea what they’d be worth?
    Thanks. – Mr. Creeper

    Reply
    • Hi, Christine —

      An 1883 no mintmark (Philadelphia) Indian Head cent is worth $2 to $3 in worn condition.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • in searching my pennys, ive come across a 1972 d penny that seems to have red color through the middle of the penny. it really looks weird. back seems to be ok. please and thank you

        Reply
        • Hi, Christine —

          Without a photo I can’t say for certain, but you seem to be describing some porosity. If so, your piece is worth 2 cents for its copper value.

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
          • Hi, Christine —

            How much off-center (percentage wise) is your 1972 cent? If you could upload a photo please that would be most helpful.

            Thank you!
            Josh

      • i have taken photo i would very much enjoy if you have some time, i know your busy, im patient person, thank you for all that you do

        Reply
  35. Hello, Josh – I have several coins I need to have evaluated. I was wondering if I could contact you privately with pictures and pay you for your services. I feel like I’m taking advantage with all my questions. I have some indian-head cents, some wheat pennies with interesting errors, a 2008D in pristine condition, and some off-center strikes (1982 and 1983). Would you be willing to take a look for me? Also, what would your fee be? Thank you, Josh! I appreciate your help so much!

    Reply
    • Hi, Nicca —

      From what I see, the coin has a significant amount of post-mint damage, including corrosion. This piece can be spent as a one-cent coin at face value if you choose.

      Thank you for your question and the great photo!
      Josh

      Reply
  36. Hello, Josh. I have an 1873 AU Indian Head penny. I cannot tell if it is closed or open 3, even though I have a book with an example of the types. There is evidence both ways to my untrained eye. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks so much!

    Reply
    • Hi, April –

      The right tail of the “1” in the date touches the “8,” making this an open 3. In AU, an 1873 Open 3 Indian Head cent sells for about $180.

      Nice coin!
      Josh

      Reply
  37. Hello again, Josh. Could this possibly be a DDO 1936? Again… my untrained eye cannot tell! Thanks so much!

    Reply
    • Very interesting… There appears to be a break in the “R” of “LIBERTY,” but it is in the opposite direction of what the doubled die diagnostics call for. Unfortunately, the photo is a tad grainy as I close in for more details on the date and rest of “LIBERTY.” I’m not ruling this out as a doubled die at this point, but would either need to see a clearer photo, please, if possible, or suggest having the coin inspected in-hand under 5X magnification.

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
      • Hi Josh! Thank you so much for your help! Here is another pic…I’m not sure if it is much better than the other one, but I tried. Of course, I will take your advice and have it looked at under 5x magnification. Thanks so much again!!!

        Reply
    • Hi, April!

      Yes, it is an off-center strike; the one unfortunate caveat here is that the coin isn’t really off center enough for it to have any additional value over face. Usually, off-center errors increase in value once the strike is about 10 to 20 percent off.

      Great find nevertheless!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, April —

      Hmm.. It looks like a possible die chip near the “D” mintmark, but unfortunately I don’t see the diagnostics in the photo indicating a D/S variety. This piece would be worth about 10 cents.

      Keep on checking your change!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Javier —

      They are both 3 to 5 percent off-center. While indeed an error, the off-centeredness is not great enough to significantly increase their values; each is worth face value. Nevertheless, great finds! Keep looking for those types of errors.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  38. Hi Joshua I have a 1945 wheat back penny that on the front there is a deep hole that goes from the fore head area to the collar and above the hole level with the surface there are blobs of copper and two long drips of copper that extend across the hole. On the back there is a peanut shaped blob that covers part of the E and most of the N in cent. most of the T and all of the ED is covered in United. Can you tell me is this worth anything. I also have a dime that the last 2 numbers of the date look to thick to tell and the IN and WE are the same. Also several letters of LIBERTY are the same . Is this worth anything? Thank you for your help. I am not a collector I just came across these.

    Reply
    • Hi, BagLady —

      I can tell you that the 1945 wheat cent with the hole has unfortunately suffered from some extensive post-mint damage and is worth essentially only its copper value (two cents). However, I am interested in seeing a photo of that dime that has the lettering that you say appears thicker than normal; that may be a die variety.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Jesus

      Hmm… It seems like I can see the “L” in “LIBERTY.” This looks like a fairly typical 1944-D Lincoln cent worth about 5 cents. Sometimes the “L” on Lincoln cents appears squeezed into the rim, and this is a rather standard example of that.

      Thank you for the question and photos!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Jesus —

      Your coin was struck 3 to 5 percent off center, causing the rim to look thicker on one side. This piece is worth face value.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  39. hi again josh, i found a 1969 penny which is missing (or nearly missing) the L in liberty.
    is this a desirable error?
    thank you for taking the time for a newbie.

    sincerely,

    rmcmahan

    Reply
    • Hi, Rhonda!

      I’m afraid the missing “L” is in part due to a standard die strike weakness and further obliterated due to post-mint damage. Nevertheless, this 1969-D cent is still worth hanging onto for its copper value, which is worth about two cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Jesus —

      Thank you for the photos. Based on the evidence of post-mint grooves on the obverse, it appears this coin has seen a bit of wear and tear in its time. The diagnostics check this coin out as a regular strike, and because it is worn, this coin carries no additional premium over face.

      Keep checking your change, and please feel free to post questions or photos of anything else that looks out of the ordinary!

      Good luck,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Jesus —

      This 1971 quarter appears to be a normal strike and has a significant amount of wear. This piece is worth face value and is safe to spend if you so choose.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Jesus —

      The addition of the photo is appreciated. I think it is a tad fuzzy as I zoom in, so I really can’t tell from these images alone. Perhaps if you could upload a photo of the obverse/date with a little more clarity I might be able to zero in and give you a more definitive answer.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
  40. hi, i work at a gas station and i guess someone turned in a deceased ones penny collection. i have a few notable wheat backs but already know the value. thru my coin roll hunting this one struck me as kinda odd. its not the spaced out 99 so it doesnt have that going for it lol. but it does look like something maybe.
    especially in you look at “in” and “god” besides it saying “berty” and ‘1999″ being messed up, resembles a double die to me. whats your take?

    Reply
    • Hello, John —

      This is an off-center piece with extraordinarily weak details, and it appears a filled die in the “LI” of LIBERTY. I haven’t seen a piece quite like this in some time. What makes this piece most interesting to me isn’t any one attribute — the coin is only a tad off center, the weak details are usually a detraction value-wise, and the missing LI would be of only minor value addition. Rather, I find this coin interesting because it seems to have a lot of things going on at once. I think I even see some type of die break near the third “9.”

      May I see a photo of the reverse? I want to see if there are any issues on the back of the coin.

      I don’t believe the coin would fetch much more than $10 if sold to a dealer based on what I’ve determined here from what I can tell in the two photos you’ve posted so far, but it nevertheless is an interesting coin.

      Neat find!
      Josh

      Reply
      • thank you for reply, this one just stood out the most to me. also just found it crazy it was roll after roll of wheat backs. i feel sorry this guy that lost his collection in that manner too. he obviously loved coins, and could only imagine what else the bank took in. this ones going in my silver collection as i feel i should hold onto it for luck.

        Reply
        • Hello, John —

          The unfortunate thing is that this happens every day. There are a lot of heirs and heiresses who have not the first clue about the coins that come into their possession.

          Often, the ones who pass these coins on have/had a thorough, life-long love for the hobby, and their collections sometimes fall into the hands of people who see the coins as mere pocket change. This is one reason why it’s actually not impossible to find some very old, scarce, and rare coins in pocket change; it’s usually not that the coins have escaped detection for decades, but rather they recently entered circulation after being parted out from a coin collection.

          At any rate, it sounds like these coins have found a safe, new home and I’m glad you’re now their steward.

          Keep on checking your change!
          Josh

          Reply
    • Hi, Jesus —

      Circulated 1971-D Roosevelt dimes such as this one are worth face value.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • This one is a large-date 1970-S cent worth about 5 cents.

      Thank you for your question and photos!
      Josh

      Reply
  41. Two questions: Are pennies before 1970 worth more than their face value when they are not worn and should you keep all “S” coins, no matter how worn? And Why?

    Thanks for your time!

    Reply
    • Hi, Gulinky —

      Actually, all Lincoln cents made before 1982 are worth more than face value (2 cents) due to their copper value. Circulated S-mint Lincoln cents are sometimes trading for 3 to 5 cents each, though this is more an exception than a rule at this point. The reason some (not all) S-mint Lincoln cents are worth more than their Philadelphia- and Denver-mint counterparts has to do with their overall lower mintage figures, making them generally harder to find.

      I hope this helps answer your questions! Please let me know if you would like further clarifcation.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  42. And while I was metal detecting in my backyard, I believe I found a coin from 1795 in a MS-63+ condition. I’m really not sure how much it is but I think an estimate might be 1-3 thousand?

    Reply
    • Hi, Edwin —

      If you found it in circulation, your 2009 Lincoln Presidential life cent is worth face value. Uncirculated pieces are worth about 10 to 20 cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Okay also the cent is missing part of the letter “E” it look like more like a “F” when it say “LIBERTY”

        Reply
        • Hi, Edwin!

          It looks like there is some weakness in the strike, but nothing to the point where there would be any additional value for this piece.

          Thank you for your question and photo!
          Josh

          Reply
    • Hi, Jesus —

      I see what may be some minor machine doubling in the “D” mintmark, but this coin isn’t a doubled die.

      Keep checking your change!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Danny —

      It depends on if you have an 1873 “closed 3” or “open 3” Indian Head cent. The former is worth about $20 to $25 in well-worn condition while the latter is valued at about $15 to $20 in the same condition. You can submit a photo of your coin here if you need help identifying it.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  43. Hi Josh, I have this 1909 wheat penny with the initials of Victor David Brenner (VBD) below the wheat stalks. Can you tell me if this is worth anything?

    Reply
    • Hi, Tia —

      Given its condition, your 1909-VDB Lincoln cent is worth about $5 to $7.

      Thank you for your question,
      Josh

      Reply
    • If you have an S on the front, you will find the coin to be extremely rare, and you can sell for a great premium. Otherwise, stick within to 5-7 dollar range.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  44. hello to everyone. its always so much fun to read about the history of coins. and here i want to know something more about the that i am having with me.
    LIBERTY 1946 s
    LIBERTY 1972
    LIBERTY 1988
    LIBERTY 1999.
    and i have some more from other countries,
    20 CONE OE DERATIO HELVETICA 1985
    1428 KINGDOM OF BAHRAIN 2007
    1426 KINGDOM OF BAHRAIN 2005
    EURO 1 CENT(FRANCE 1999)
    GEORGIA VI KING EMPEROR- ONE QUARTER ANNA INDIA 1939
    GEORGIA VI KING EMPEROR- ONE QUARTER ANNA INDIA 1940
    SINGAPURA 1997 SINGAPORE $1
    .
    My one friend told me this all have their one value and can be expensive too, so if anyone have any idea about all this and if anyone want to buy any of this then you can contact be on my email, my email id is [email protected].
    i can send picture on request.
    thank you

    Reply
  45. Hi,
    I have this 1958 penny I believe is a doubled die. I took pictures with different lighting to try to catch what I see. Note the VDB is not there either. Thanks

    Reply
    • Hi, Anna —

      I wish I could see what you see in regards to doubling, but I’m afraid there is nothing evident on my end. The letters appear thick, but as I zoom in (great clarity by the way with the photos — thank you) I see signs of post-mint damage in the scattered marks and such.

      The missing VDB under the shoulders isn’t all that uncommon with worn specimens of 1950s Lincoln cents; I have seen several like that so I’m not too surprised that they aren’t evident here.

      As far as I can tell, this piece is worth 2 to 3 cents, but if you’d like to provide some insight on where you see the doubling, I’d be glad to zoom back in and take a look with you again.

      Thanks!
      Josh

      Reply
      • Thanks Josh.
        Cozy magnifier app on phone is great for coin studying. The problem I’m having with posting other pics showing different angles is that the files are too big to upload. I took some with negative effect & it shows what I’m seeing in person.
        Thanks,
        Anna

        Reply
        • Hi, Anna!

          I do see signs of possible machine doubling in the date and lettering. If that is indeed the case, I would suggest your coin is worth between 5 and 10 cents.

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
  46. Hi guys,
    I sort through hundreds of thousands of pennies keeping the coppers and rejecting the zincs based on weight. The zincs almost always weigh 2.5 grams and the coppers weigh 3.1 grams & 3.0 grams if worn. I use a weight scale as my eyes are old. The 1983 cent weighs 2.9 grams. No other cent I’ve checked weighs close to 2.9 except Canadian 1980 & 1981 at 2.8 grams. Any help on how to proceed would be appreciated. Thanks

    Reply
    • Hi, Ricky –

      Neat! You have a 1909-S VDB Lincoln cent replica. This has no numismatic value but is nonetheless a great display piece.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Ahhh.. Thank You so Much,, 🙂
        I was Thinking of Buying this from my Friend, cause I thought this is a Real one… But I guess,, I’ll Just give this back to the owner,, hehe 🙂

        Does this piece Cost something?? or Cost less at all?? haha

        Reply
        • Hi, Ricky –

          Well, if you’re interested in buying it (and it would make a neat mantle knick-knack for a coin collector) I would offer $2 or so — that’s a common price for such trinkets at novelty shops.

          I’m glad I could help!
          Josh

          Reply
    • Hi, Justin —

      This is a Free Masons counterstamp. Many pennies have been counterstamped with this symbol and handed out as tokens or souvenirs. It’s worth 50 cents to $1 as a novelty coin.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Rooskie —

      This coin has certainly had a hard life. While it’s worth face value, I’m sure this coin’s story would be one I’d sit down and listen to (if it could talk of course).

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • thank you very much josh . I do have some that are serious .a 1909 that is awesome ill post some more thanks for the info.

        Reply
  47. Hey guys I’m just trying to find some help with pricing a few coins my grandfather left me here are a couple photos included would really love some help on this

    Reply
    • Hello, Travis —

      You have Morgan silver dollars, which were minted from 1878 through 1921. The 1921s are each worth $18 to $20, though the 1879 Morgan dollar could be worth more based on its mintmark. The mintmark indicates what branch of the United States Mint the coin was struck, and is represented by either one or two tiny letters under the eagle on the reverse (“tail’s side”) of the coin.

      If you want, you could submit a photo of the 1879 dollar reverse and I could look for you.

      Good luck,
      Josh

      Reply
        • Hi, Travis —

          I’m afraid not. While Morgan silver dollars are indeed desirable and collectible coins, they are really quite common in the scheme of things and are not really worth anything significantly more unless they are scarce dates (which is why I wanted to check the 1879 dollar reverse to see what its mintmark might be if any) or are in uncirculated condition. All grading does is verify the authenticity of the coin and labels each piece with a professional grading opinion, but that won’t necessarily change the amount you would get for these coins.

          If you would like assistance in determining the mintmark of the 1879 dollar please upload a reverse (tail’s side) image and I’d be glad to check..

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
  48. Hi. I found this rare 1988 D lincoln penny. I’m a new eye in coin collecting so am a not sure what to expect for a find like thus. Could you give me some insight please and thanks in advance? Sorry for poor picture quality.

    Reply
    • Hello, Sam —

      Wide AM and Close AM refer to the proximity in spacing between the bottoms of the letters “A” and “M” in AMERICA on the reverse, or tail’s side, of the Lincoln cent. Generally, Close AM specimens show the bottoms of the two letters touching each other, or nearly so. With Wide AMs there is some degree of spacing.

      As for what doubled die coins are, this article explains them with photos: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/doubled-die-coins/

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
  49. Hi i have an 1980d penny and was woundering if anyone can help me. There seems to be two bars behind Lincolns head and on the other side it seem to be a desing that is bigger and turned the wrong way. Please help!

    Reply
  50. I have a 1994 penny, the words LIBERTY and the year is not stamped all the way. Is this just from circulation or is it an error. Also the coin is off center alittle bit, do you know what the value of this coin would be?

    Reply
    • Hi, Sylas —

      It’s possible the coin was struck with a partly filled die, causing part of LIBERTY to be obscured. I would need to kindly see a photo of the coin to be sure it isn’t altered by post-mint damage. You can post any photos of your coins here in the comments forum.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Jessica!

      Yes, these are worth more than face value — 5 cents each. I love picking old wheat cents from pocket change. Keep your eyes open for more!

      Thank you for your question and photo,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Angel —

      The value of such a piece would depend on the coin itself. From a bullion perspective, the value would be pretty small, assuming the coin isn’t very large.

      If this is a question about a specific coin in your possession, would you please upload an image of the coin you’re inquiring about?

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Really great finds, Sandra —

      While the 1989 cent exhibits what appears to be signs of environmental damage, the 1776-1976 quarter from every indication indeed has a die crack, and I see what looks like a die cud/die crack of some sort under the next near the “P mintmark on the Roosevelt dime. Values for these coins could be $5 to $10 or more.

      Awesome work! Keep on checking your change!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Matt –

      I’m trying to determine the anomaly with this coin. It appears this coin exhibits some light striations across the obverse and dark spots (possibly oxidation/corrosion). What about this coin stands out to you? I’ll be glad to inform as I learn more about what made this coin appear unusual to you.

      Thank you for your photo!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Teri —

      Such discoloration is pretty common with the zinc Lincoln cents made since 1982. I don’t see anything really abnormal here, and these pieces should be worth face value.

      Good luck,
      Josh

      Reply
  51. Hello, Andres —

    The price you’ve seen on CoinTracker is a very specific price for just one that has sold in a transaction. The price range for a 1944 steel cent is generally $75,000 to $150,000, depending on condition. Would you please post a photo of your 1944 cent so I can help you determine what you have and what it might be worth?

    Thanks!
    Josh

    Reply
      • Hi, James —

        Would you please submit images of these 1944 steel wheat cents? 1944 steel wheat cents are extraordinarily rare. While having a few of them certainly isn’t impossible as a couple dozen or so exist, it’s very unlikely. I’ll have to see for sure what you have to provide you with a decent value estimate.

        Thank you,
        Josh

        Reply
  52. I have a 1983 penny with extra “copper” over the in God we trust. U fortunately I cannot upload a picture. Where can I get it checked out in long Island ny?

    Reply
    • Hello, Kim —

      Would you please post a photo of your 1983 cent with the “extra copper”?

      Thank you so much for your question — I look forward to hopefully helping you further with your inquiry.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  53. Anyone know anything about a 1990 no S penny? Like… If they’re not marked with an S or a D, then they’re worth a lot more than a penny?

    Reply
    • Hi, Michelle –

      The 1990 no-S proof collector cent, which has mirror-like surfaces, is worth around $2,500 to $3,000. If you found your Lincoln cent in pocket change, it’s in all likelihood a business-strike 1990 Philadelphia cent, which has no mintmark and is worth face value if worn.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply