Most Valuable Dimes: A List Of Silver Dimes & Other Old Dimes You Should Hold Onto!

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I love looking through my pocket change for old dimes — especially silver dimes.

Believe it or not, my dad found a couple silver dimes years ago while buying snacks out of a vending machine, and I’ve found old dimes, too.

Many old dimes are worth more than 10 cents, and some are worth many times over face value.

But how do you know what old dimes are valuable and which ones you can spend?

I’ve compiled a list of the top dimes that you should look for in your pocket change, coin jars, and coin rolls. I’ve also included a list of their approximate values, too.

Good luck!

Barber Silver Dimes

OK, Barber dimes are really hard to find in circulation — let me just tell you that right now. But believe it or not, some people have managed to find very worn examples of these late 19th- and early 20th-century coins in bank rolls and spare change.

While many Barber dimes aren’t really rare from the coin collecting standpoint, they are virtually elusive in circulation these days, so finding one is a real triumph for anybody, even if the Barber dime that turns up is a barely recognizable common-date.

So what are old Barber silver dimes worth?

Well, the ones that you have the greatest likelihood of finding aren’t worth a whole lot. Most well-worn, common-date Barber dimes have a value of $3 to $5, and in some cases a bit less if they have been cleaned or have other types of damage.

Again though, you’ll have quite a story to tell if you actually find a Barber dime, struck from 1892 through 1916, in circulation these days, and that’s an experience worth much more than $5.

Mercury Silver Dimes

Like Barber dimes, old Mercury silver dimes are also very difficult to find in circulation these days. They’re relatively more easily found in dime rolls, which is also true when you’re looking for other types of old dimes.

Mercury dimes were made during the years 1916 through 1945. Of those years, you’re most likely to find old silver dimes dating from 1934 through 1945. Overall, these dates are considered to be quite common in the numismatic sense.

In fact, well-worn examples of Mercury dimes struck from the mid 1930s through mid 1940s are worth around $2 to $4.

However, when you realize that only a very small number of people have actually found Mercury dimes in circulation since the 1970s, the novelty of snatching one of these beauties from pocket change or a dime roll is really quite spectacular.

Roosevelt Dimes

The Roosevelt dime first appeared in circulation in 1946 — just 1 year after President Franklin Delano Roosevelt died. Naturally, the Roosevelt dime was seen as a wonderful tribute to the man who had led the nation through not just the Great Depression but World War II, as well.

Millions of Roosevelt dimes were saved, and within a decade, several issues would become known as relatively scarce in the eyes of coin collectors.

Pre-1965 Roosevelt dimes are especially valuable because they contain silver.

Here’s a list of Roosevelt dimes that are worth more than face value, along with their current values:

  • All Roosevelt dimes dated 1946 through 1964 — $1.50 and up
  • 1949 — $1.75
  • 1949-D — $1.75
  • 1949-S — $1.75
  • 1950-S — $1.75
  • 1951-S — $1.75
  • 1952-S — $1.75
  • 1955 — $1.75
  • 1955-D — $1.75
  • 1955-S — $1.75
  • 1982 no mintmark — $200
  • 1996-W (West Point) — $15
  • Worn copper-nickel proof Roosevelt dimes (“S” mintmark) — $1

More About Old Silver Dimes

Next up: Most Valuable Quarters – A List Of Silver Quarters & Other Rare Quarters You Should Hold Onto!

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69 thoughts on “Most Valuable Dimes: A List Of Silver Dimes & Other Old Dimes You Should Hold Onto!”

  1. i have a 2004 p dime that i think is a cud it has a large bubble on the front side and a small bubble on the back side can you tell me anything about it is it worth anything

    Reply
  2. I have a ??75 or 73 dime numbers are not clear also the(in god we trust) it says god trust rest is almost gone and a crease behind Roosevelt head

    Reply
    • Hi, Ronald —

      It seems these photos are bit blurry on my end. If possible, would you please retake them and resubmit here so I can see what may be going on with your 1970s Roosevelt dimes, please?

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Hi, Juan —

        Very interesting. This does appear to be doubling, though I can’t seem to bring up the detail close enough to ascertain its origin. It seems like a slight rotation on the device detail. I would consider submitting this to a third-party grader for authentication, though I can’t find any pricing information or attribution of this elsewhere, so IF it is a doubled die (and not machine doubling), then I don’t know if the fee for submission ($20, more or less) would be justified or not in terms of what, if at all, you might make from selling it.

        That decision is up to you. However, here is some more info on the major third-party coin grading companies in the industry: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

        Good luck!
        Josh

        Reply
  3. Hey everyone! I am so sorry to bother you guys but I was wondering if anyone could help me figure out the value of this 1968 dime without an “s” and with a strike or line defect/error going down the face! Thank you in advance!!

    Reply
    • Hi, Natalia —

      What you have is a regular-issue Philadelphia-mint dime. Dimes made at the Philadelphia Mint before 1980 didn’t carry a “P” mintmark. The 1968 no-S proof dime that you were asking about would have been a “proof” variety coin, which would have mirror-like surfaces, finer details, and a rim with a different profile.

      This piece, as it is worn, is worth 10 cents. But I certainly encourage you to keep your eyes peeled for more treasures. I promise there are plenty of rare and valuable errors and varieties in circulation!

      Good luck,
      Josh

      Reply
  4. I get a kick out of the fact that “only a small amount of people find mercury dimes in circulation,” as I have 6 in possession, all acquired over the past 3-5 years.

    Reply
    • Hi, Danisrh —

      How are you finding all of those Mercury dimes? Are you looking through old rolls? Do you work at a cash register? It looks like Lady Luck is certainly smiling in your direction! Great work!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  5. Hello Josh! I have an interesting 1941-S mercury dime. The pictures do not do it justice, but there is a clear “S” just to the left of the “E” in Liberty. Folks have been saying it is dirt or tarnish, but this is a clear S. In addition, it is in almost the same position as the final “S” in “States” is on the reverse of the coin. Could this be some type of die clash error? Thanks so much!!!

    Reply
    • Hi, April!

      I do see a clear “S,” but it unfortunately was not placed there by the Mint. It appears to be an ink spot some sort – perhaps somebody intentionally marked the coin with an “S.” I’d be curious about the story behind that!

      At any rate, this coin is currently worth about $3.

      Interesting find!
      Josh

      Reply
  6. I’m so glad I found this site!! I hope I can get some answers to some coins I have. I have scanned several pennies I found and was wondering first of all when scanning some of the pennies why so much color comes through the picture? Also if you could tell me more about the 1969 penny. Not sure how to download the picture but will try. Thank you!!

    Reply
  7. Hi Joshua,

    I have a 2010-P Roosevelt Dime that I noticed the date was missing a small portion of the lettering. While taking a look at the coin, I also noticed that the head portion seemed to be raised and the backside seemed to be dented a bit. Additionally, there appears to be stretching on the edge details, most clearly seen in the “In God We Trust” area. I tried to capture this in the attached photos. Please let me know what your thoughts are.

    Thanks!

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b208745455d7df2b5acb74efc7ad32fb87cfff881ca586767b9a6dfb91ef9162.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/ff8e2f68246feb424aa578109dcb54f9420436d5972187cddffeef085bb9dc34.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3e8fbc52d8d7eec6fac7f9677787751bfc8925f0895ed051473e4032af71f6a6.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/0f0b8162e6a1d90e385e8b59ee31dbcf53f99e0a07dcc09d06dc03e15a6f1b66.jpg

    Reply
    • Hello, Hammer!

      Based on what I see, this looks like a possible die clash error. These are typically worth around $5.

      Nice find!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Jomo —

      Is IN GOD WE TRUST the only inscription on the coin? Would you please attach a photo of the coin herein the comments forum?

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Trumpet Boy —

      May I see a photo of the coins? If they’re cuts, it’s likely post-mint damage, but I’ll be happy to check for sure.

      Thanks!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Blondie —

      Would you please post photos of this coin so I can be of further assistance?

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Tink —

      Would you mind posting a photo of your 1920 dime and other ones, too? I’d be glad to assist in helping you find out more about these coins…

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  8. Hi Joshua,
    I was wondering if you might be able to take a look at this 1964 brassy looking, very penny I came across. I have pictures next to a regular brown 1964, as well as a picture next to a 2016 penny as that shine and color seems to resemble this 1964 penny color and shine. I read about the 1964 sms penny. I’m not saying that this is one of those, just looking for your opinion. Thank you in advance for anything you might be able to tell me. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a8152bbe564daf8742a93b5eaaddf51ee4c09e5674fbec9e352fb465bcdaf6a0.jpg
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/e4bff439af6ea43ee03023f80cc8753e816bc2cb0ee8bc464f4f615574fc0186.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/047a7600f6bfacc28d8c6147a8503600ccef9108d5a01802bf86ee20518259cb.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/92b70c0ae77431363ad27ca140df8841e99619b6a0dd01cc4fec3d3dd929e733.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/6c2192f3e18010670967b75c5ec35154a06314a6fbf2a9f4c0d291a381ba9840.png

    Reply
    • Hello, Diane!

      What you have is a beautiful, uncirculated 1964 Lincoln cent that hasn’t seen the effects of 50+ years of circulation! Virtually all pre-1982 Lincoln cents, which are made from a mainly copper composition, will turn brown over the course of time in circulation. But uncirculated Lincoln cents that have not been exposed to the elements will generally retain their original, “Red” (as collectors often say) color.

      So, basically, this is what a shiny, new penny looked like in the mid 1960s! It’s worth somewhere between 20 and 30 cents (there are still hundreds of thousands of uncirculated 1964 pennies locked away in collections and old roll hoards), but it’s definitely a keeper!

      Great find! Thank you for sharing it here with us.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Hi Josh,
        Thank you for the response. I really appreciate it. I have just found a 1969D dime very strange the rim has a thin strip of silver and some sort of brown material on both sides of the silver strip. It’s really cool looking wondering if you’ve ever heard about this dime?
        I’m not home but would love to post a picture of it to show you when I get home. If that’s okay with you . No rush at getting back if u get some time I’d like your opinion.
        Thank you,
        Have a great day

        Reply
        • Hi, Diane –

          By all means please feel free to post the photo of this 1969-D dime here and I’ll be glad to check it out and provide some feedback. It’s hard to say from this point if it’s a jeweler’s collar mount, which would allow the coin to be affixed to a bracelet or necklace, but we shall see!

          Have a wonderful day, too!
          Josh

          Reply
    • Hello, Patricia —

      What’s interesting is that the designs on both sides look very similar to, but not exactly like, two distinctly different gold coin designs from the 19th century. I can’t inspect this pendant in-hand, so I don’t want to say for certain, but it looks like the medal inside the pendant may actually be a private-mint piece that resembles the designs of two coin types from the late 19th century. If that is true, I don’t know what the value of the piece within would be without knowing its metal content. It’s very possible this coin may have more monetary value as part of the a pendant than for any of its own merits alone. This is a very beautiful keepsake and one I hope you enjoy wearing and owning!

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Aekblade —

      This looks to me like your 1942 Mercury dime is a dapple-toned uncirculated business strike based on the quality of the strike and rim. However, I’d need to see the reverse (“tail’s side) of the coin, too.

      Distinguishing a proof versus a business-strike US coin of that era is fairly difficult unless you’ve seen a lot of both coins, but to check for a proof you would be looking for squareness of the rim (the side profile of the rim), very sharp design details, and overall surface quality. A 1942 uncirculated business-strike Mercury dime is worth anywhere from about $6 and up. A proof is worth about $125 and up.

      I hope this info is helpful! Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Bridget —

      This is a circulated copper-nickel 1965 Roosevelt dime that is worth face value. It’s over 50 years old though — if only this dime could talk!

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Robert —

      This looks like heavy machine doubling due to the smeared appearance of the doubled letters, but if you want a second opinion a good person to check with is die variety expert John Wexler. Here’s his info: https://www.doubleddie.com

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
  9. Hello,

    My 21 year old daughter passed away unexpectedly a few months ago. And just yesterday I watched a show about how the deceased will leave Dimes for their loved ones to find, so that they know they are OK, and that they are looking over their loved ones still on earth.

    After the show I went into my daughters room and was compelled to look through her room just to be close to her. She had a wallet from her Deceased Grandfather that she cherished & that she used sometimes. She kept it in her drawer in her room. I had gone to that wallet many times since her passing and held it and looked in it. And found nothing. That day I felt she was telling me to look in it again. I did, I found nothing. But I heard her voice saying no, look again! So I did, and tucked all the way back in a pocket of the wallet, was a Dime.
    It was a 1974 d Roosevelt Dime.

    You can imagine my surprise & gratitude when I found it. Had I found it earlier before I saw the show about the Dimes. It would probably had not meant much to me. So I believe that was the day I was suppose to find the Dime.

    So, I was wondering I attached a picture of the Dime. By any chance do you think it is an Error Coin. As the wording “In God We Trust” seems to be cut off.

    Thank you for reading this far and I appreciate your comments what ever they may be.

    Best to you!

    P.S.
    And today I found another Dime and it was dated 1996 the year of my daughters birth. It is now my Profile Avatar. 🙂

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f3ff97b6be2dfc1195ca800bf63cabeabe62ac04603a893475b438118d4feda3.jpg

    Reply
    • Ann,

      We at The Fun Times Guide share our deepest condolences with you…

      …As for the 1974-D dime, it does appear a bit off center. It’s not off quite enough to enhance its numismatic value (usually 10% or more off center is the threshold for making an off-center coin really valuable), but it’s nevertheless unusual and a keeper for many reasons.

      All the best to you,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Allen —

      That bulge near the flame is actually damage. This is a very common form of bubbling that happens when copper-nickel clad coins such as yours are exposed to extreme heat (blow torch, fire, oven, etc.) Therefore this piece is worth face value…

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Kendel —

      All 1965 Roosevelt dimes are found without mintmarks; no United States Coin was made with mintmarks in 1965, 1966, or 1967. If your piece is worn it’s worth face value.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
  10. Hi! I stumbled on your site a few weeks ago, and it reawakened my interest. I collected coins back in the 60s, when you could get all kinds of interesting coins in change. You could even go to the bank and get real silver dollars then! Indian-head pennies were occasionally found as well. Steel cents were very common, as were standing-liberty quarters. You’ve motivated me to dig out my old collection and see what I have!

    Reply
    • Hi, Judy!

      That’s fantastic! Thank you so much for those kind words and for sharing that story of your collecting journey with us! If you have any questions or cool finds, please be sure to drop a line.

      Happy collecting,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Joseph —

      Your 1967 dime exhibits dark toning; there are no cladding issues or other evident errors with this piece, which shows signs of exposure to environmental factors that caused its dark coloration.

      Thank you for reaching out,
      Josh

      Reply

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