Tips For Collecting Roosevelt Dimes: Easy To Find In Circulation & Valuable Too!

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Collecting Roosevelt dimes can be both fun and challenging.

Roosevelt Dimes

After all, while Roosevelt dimes flood our pocket change, it can be a bit costly for some to buy and assemble a collection of the silver Roosevelt dime.

Roosevelt dimes were first made in 1946.

In 1965, the United States Mint began striking copper-nickel clad Roosevelt dimes.

 

Roosevelt Dimes: Fun & Challenging To Collect

Upon first thought, you may not think there’s much to get excited about with Roosevelt dimes. After all, there have been:

  • No design changes on the Roosevelt dime — ever
  • No major regular-strike rarities
  • No big-time news stories about Roosevelt dimes

And then you realize that Roosevelt dimes:

  • Are 90% silver from 1946 to 1964 and for certain proofs since 1992
  • Are mostly inexpensive and easy to collect
  • Include a couple rare errors
  • Twice bore a ‘W’ (West Point New York) mintmark

So, you still think the Roosevelt dime series is boring? I didn’t think so!

Here’s a list of current Roosevelt dime values.

 

Strategies For Collecting Roosevelt Dimes

Roosevelt dimes are pretty easy to find in circulation. As its goes with most areas of coin collecting, the biggest challenges come in finding certain dates.

Roosevelt Dimes

For example, all Roosevelt dimes made before 1965 are made from a composition consisting of 90% silver. Virtually all of these coins were removed from circulation by silver hoarders by the end of the 1960s and are very difficult to find today.

Having said that, silver Roosevelt dimes still do turn up on occasion. So it’s worth checking your change and especially searching rolls of dimes to look for these old silver coins.

A few years back, it was relatively easy to pick through bank rolls of dimes ($5 each, or 50 coins) and boxes of dimes ($250 worth, or 2,500) and find at least 1 or 2 silver dimes.

These days, so many silver stackers are looking for silver and are in on this silver coin searching game that it’s becoming more difficult to find silver coins from local banks — but you can still find silver dimes in circulation if you’re persistent.

At this point, the Roosevelt dime is not as widely collected as, say, Lincoln cents, are. Therefore, many of the semi-key dates are in good supply at many coin shops. Sometimes they’re even sold at discount rates simply to move the inventory out of the store.

Clad Roosevelt dimes are, as might be expected, easy to find in circulation. Of course, these coins are worn and may not be satisfactory to coin collectors who want gem-quality coinage.

For those uncirculated Roosevelt dimes, a stop by the local coin dealer will again be necessary. Most clad Roosevelt dime dates can be bought for as little as 30 to 50 cents each.

Proofs and error Roosevelt dimes can be bought from your local coin dealer, too — but don’t forget to check your change for those error coins!

For example, the 1982 no-P Roosevelt dime can be located in circulation and many people wind up with this exciting clad coin error simply by picking it up in pocket change for face value. The 1982 no-P dime is worth about $75 in worn condition.

If you closely scrutinize every Roosevelt dime that passes through your hands, you many find other varieties — such as doubled dies, repunched mintmarks, and other exciting error coins!

 

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202 thoughts on “Tips For Collecting Roosevelt Dimes: Easy To Find In Circulation & Valuable Too!”

    • Doctor,

      As it went years ago, you could order coins directly from the mints and simply pay extra for shipping. While most coins offered for sale by the mint do come with a markup, there is a program called the Direct Ship program for dollar coin — you can find out more about it with this link: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/direct_ship/

      Otherwise, the best way to get freshly minted coins for face value is to order bag or roll quantities from banks which receive shipments from the government.

      Reply
      • Hi,
        I have a 1975 dime no mint mark. Can you please tell me what to look for. I see its worth 500m but doubt mine is. Can you assist

        Reply
  1. I have some roosevelt dimes I. Would like to get more information on if you can help great if not its ok thank you very much for you’re time…. the coins are as followed ” I belive”

    1968 no mint mark 

    1975 no mint mark 

    How do I tell if these coins are “S” and just missing the mint mark as I can see online they are rare and I got this coins in a collection along with some silver coin please let me know thanks

    Reply
  2. I just found a penny that has no head side to it. Both sides are stamped identical tail sides, you know it looks like a building. There is no year because that’s on the front. Is this worth anything?

    Reply
    • Greedy,

      Sounds like you have a novelty coin that was minted most likely for a magician. Such pieces have no collector value.

      Reply
  3. I have been reading more about the Roosevelt Dimes, and everytime I find there has not been any changes to the design. I have quite a few of them that seem to have a larger bust, and either the mint mark or the letters are closer to the rim. They are mostly between 1970 and 1975. Any ideas?

    Reply
  4. Rich,

    Up through the late 1980s, mintmarks were hand-applied to the hubs that created the dies (the latter being the device that imprints images on coins), thus explaining the variances in mintmark/letter placement.

    Reply
    • Hi, Kyle –

      May we see pictures of the 1982 and 1983 dimes without mint marks? Those could be worth $100 each or more because they should have either a “P” or “D” mintmark on them.

      Reply
    • Hi, Kyle –

      You’re right; they are worth face value, unless they are in uncirculated (in mint condition), in which case they would be worth around 30 cents each.

      Reply
    • Hi, Holly –

      Well, I can narrow the date of this coin to 1980 or later, given that I see a “P” mintmark above the date, and the Philadelphia mint did not strike dimes with a mintmark until 1980. In fact, this appears to be a 1981-P Roosevelt dime because the third digit of the date looks to have a complete loop at both its top and bottom, and the font style and height would appear to fit the “8” from that year.

      As for what happened to your coin, it is highly plausible that it met some very caustic chemicals, most likely acid. Note to the world, acid and coins do not mix!

      Reply
  5. Hi, I just sold a 1946 s Roosevelt dime in a LOT on eBay. This dime has what I would term a “strike error” though not sure WHAT would cause this (circle struck at center of face side). Have you ever seen this before -and do you know what caused it?

    The entire eBay LOT, plus close-up PHOTO of this DIME can be seen at eBay SEARCH: item # “13090501794”. it Sold today – so that item # is still searchable for a few weeks at least.

    I’m a complete novice at coins, so probably let a few goodies go in this $225 batch that sold w/in 3 minutes and 1 second of launch.

    I researched some, but not as much as I’d have liked to have had time for.

    Most coins were poor/good to very good with a few better. Somewhere in there I let something valuable get by -remember: 3 minutes and 1 second from being born, this got snagged.

    Any thoughts on that 1946 Roosevelt dime, at least, would be very appreciated.
    THANKS!
    ~jeff

    Reply
    • Hello,

      Hmm… Tried using both the basic and the advanced search for the number (which I copied and pasted to ensure it is exactly as you list here) and unfortunately can’t find the lot on eBay.

      Without seeing the image, it is hard to say what, exactly, would have caused a circle. Firstly, is he circle raised or sunken into the design? It could be anything from a type of error called a “strike through,” in which a piece if debris impeded the striking of your coin. Or, it could even be post mint damage. If you can post any photos of the 1946 Roosevelt dime, I’d be glad to take a look and make a further determination!

      Reply
    • Hello,

      This appears to be a die chip or cud, and these are usually worth anywhere from $1 to $5.

      Thanks for your question!

      Reply
  6. Hay, Joshua

    I found a dime that is a 1978 NO MINT MARK and I tried searching it up and found nothing. Is it worth any thing? can’t loud a pic, but it’s just a regular dime no trace of a mint mark. Thanks for any information you can give.

    Y.D

    Reply
    • Hello, Y.D. —

      The “97” on your 1997 penny may look faded away due to a the coin being weakly struck or experiencing some unusually lopsided wear. In either case, the value of the coin wouldn’t be any more than usual which, in the case of worn 1997 pennies, is face value.

      Your 1978 dime without a mintmark was struck in Philadelphia and is also worth face value if worn and around 25 cents in typical mint condition.

      Thanks for your questions!
      -Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Tina —

      Would you please post a photo of your 1981 dime with the extra dot? This may be a mint error, but I can’t say for certain without seeing an image.

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
  7. I have a 1981 W/3 P and very heavy double die on reverse and obverse. On all letters as well as Roosevelt.. Would this be worth anything ???

    Reply
  8. I have a 1981 W/3 P and very heavy double die on reverse and obverse. On all letters as well as Roosevelt.. Would this be worth anything ???

    Reply
    • Hello, Eva —

      It appears that this may be a case of doubling due to die deterioration as opposed to a doubled die. While the appearance of the coin is striking, usually machine doubling/die deterioration coins aren’t worth much more, if anything, beyond their usual values.

      I hope this helps!

      Reply
      • Thank you Joshua.. That, in deed was a lot of help.seems like you know a lot about coins, do you have a specific forum that I can I you questions about other coins?

        Reply
        • Hello, Eva —

          I really appreciate those kind comments! Actually, this is the best forum I have for those who want to ask me questions or are looking for my opinions about their coins, so if there’s anything else you’d like to know, please feel free to fire away!

          Have a great day,
          Josh

          Reply
  9. I have a Roosevelt Silver Dime 196* with the last digit mostly missing, I cannot tell what it would have been though. But I do believe it is a silver dime. Any idea what it might be worth?

    There is something in place of the last digit/number, but I cannot tell what it is.

    Reply
    • Hello!

      You indeed have a silver dime, and I can tell it’s a 1964 Roosevelt dime you have, representing the last year of production of regularly circulating 90% silver coinage in the United States.

      Your piece is worth $1.80 to $2 given current silver values.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Alejandro —

      If your 1970-D Roosevelt dime is worn, it’s worth face value.

      Thanks for checking with us!
      Josh

      Reply
        • Hi, Kevin —

          If it’s worn, your 1968 Roosevelt dime is worth it’s face value. Still though, it’s amazing there are coins that are nearly 50 years old still circulating out there.

          Keep your eyes out! There are many valuable coins still in pocket change. Please let us know if you find any others you’re curious about!

          Reply
  10. Hello. I have a 1970 dime with a diamond on the neck that has DOM on the inside. I tried researching, and found nothing. Any ideas? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hi, Jazmine —

      Yes, you have a post-mint alteration. While neat looking, this isn’t a mint error, which makes this a novelty coin. Such pieces may have a value of 50 cents to $2 if a collector interested in these types of pieces were to buy it.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  11. I have 1991 P dime missing the “E” in LIBERTY. I’ve done some research on it and can’t even find anything similar to it. Anyone have any idea if this coin has any value?…

    Reply
  12. i have 19?? dime cant make out last two numbers, but one appears to be a 6 or 9 the. mint markbis smudged and the wordsin & we from in god we trust are missing. and the l in liberty is shortened any ideas?

    Reply
    • Hi, Bob —

      This is due to a striking weakness exacerbated by wear. This is a rather common problem with many Roosevelt dimes and is worth face value.

      Thanks for your question!
      Josh

      Reply
  13. Hello same as Kevin can u tell me what this is worth I found a bunch nickel and dimes quarters of us money’s in my Canadian jar lol

    Reply
  14. Hello,
    I recently found this 196? Roosevelt dime while metal detecting a local elementary school. It was lying on the ground near a bench. I haven’t cleaned it up yet but hopefully you can see the date. It clearly say 196 and then the last digit looks more like a raised blob than a number. Please shine some light on this for me.
    Thanks!

    Bruce

    Reply
    • Hi, Bruce!

      Well, we can rule out this coin being made before 1965, as up until then the “D” mintmark would have been placed on the reverse of the coin, not above the date on the obverse. There were no mintmarks on U.S. coins from 1965 through 1967, leaving this to be a 1968 or 1969.I’m leaning toward 1968 give the physical placement of the “blob,” which likely occurred due to surface damage. It’s possible it would be a die chip of some sort that would have deformed the shape of the (likely) “8,” though it would take a close look under a coin loupe and someone with numismatic experience to inspect the coin in-hand to make sure. Such pieces are worth $2 to $5 if indeed authentic.

      I would still lean toward surface damage, though, given the apparent condition of the coin otherwise.

      At any rate, nice find! It’s always fun to treasure hunt for old coins!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  15. I Noticed this time has no outer rim. Appears to be a 1983 D, all the edges are there, but front and back has no rim. Should I keep, does it have any collectors value

    Reply
    • Hi, Tod –

      Very observant! Roosevelt dimes of this era sometimes had a softer-looking strike to being with, and circulation wear in addition to that will further soften the appearance of the coin’s rim (as evidenced by the softening of the words of IN GOD WE TRUST and the tops of the letters in LBERTY. So, while this coin looks unusual it actually isn’t rare.

      Thank you for checking here though!

      All the best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, did you ever get a reply? Looks like an interesting one. I don’t know if they could have a D over S, but it could be re-plugged in and turned slightly. It could be anything I guess! LOL would love to see that one with a magnifying glass! Did you ever find out what it was? I would get several photos, or even on a flatbed scanner at a very high dpi, and send to one of the error groups to ask. Try to use a couple different light directions just so people are mistaking shadows for metal.

      Reply
    • Hello, Was —

      Thank you for your question. This is a circulated 1975 Philadelphia (so no mintmark) dime. These are worth face value. I would hold onto it if I were you because of the sentimental value it holds for you.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
        • Great question, Tayler —

          It can seem confusing to think that a 1990 Philadelphia and 1990 no-S penny are in the eyes of collectors two entirely different things. After all, they sound the same by description, don’t they?

          Here’s the key difference: while the 1990 Philadelphia cent, which doesn’t have a mintmark, was struck for use in general circulation, the 1990 no-S Lincoln cent is a “proof” specimen designed for coin collectors. All 1990 proof Lincoln cents are supposed to have a San Francisco “S” mintmark, but about 200 are known to have somehow slipped through the hands of mint employees without this crucial detail.

          The 1990 no-S penny will have much sharper details than any 1990 Philadelphia cent, and a 1990 no-S penny in unworn condition will have mirror-like surfaces.

          If you have any follow-up questions or need further clarification, please let me know!

          Thanks,
          Josh

          Reply
    • Hi, Tom —

      It looks like it was weakly struck to begin with, and excessive wear led to the obliteration of the fourth digit in the date. Though eye catching, these types of pieces are usually worth face value if worn.

      Reply
      • Thanks. I’ll hold on to it because it looks like the LIBERTY is not fully stamped and the rest of the lettering is not worn to the same degree, as well as the fact that only the first 2 numbers are distinct. The amount of wear needed to obliterate the last 2 digits would’ve/should’ve affected the whole coin.

        Reply
  16. I am a small time collector. Most of what I get is from circulation. I have a dime from 1954. Got it in change. I am an avid collector of the 1776-1976 bicentennial quarters. The year I was born. So I found an P series dime from the 90s. I can’t tell the year really. I believe it was supposed to be a ’96. The 6 is missing but there seems to be a very faint impression. In god we trust is also off. The I and the WE is un readable. The top quarter of the word Liberty is not very visible either. I think it is an example of a poor stamping.

    Reply
    • Hi, Michael —

      Without seeing a photo of the suspect dime, I can’t say for certain but lean toward your impression of the coin being an example of a weak strike.

      The 1954 dime is an awesome find. It’s been very hard to find any silver in circulation since the 1970s and early 1980s.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Could also be a struck through error. There’s a premium on it if it is. I’m not an errors collector, but could probably tell if it’s struck through something, often grease, which can cause parts to be missing, or simply a weak strike. Values on struck through errors seem to vary cosiderably, with condition, whats missing, if struck through a piece of wire or something, is any of it left imbedded in the coin, etc. etc. lot of variables, but as with anything, ultimately, the value is simply what someone will pay. Hence, i like to list in auctions with low start prices, and hope at least 2 people want it.

        Reply
  17. Hi I’ve found a 2011 p dime is this worth anything or will it be in future could someone please advise thanks in advance 🙂

    Reply
    • Hi, Marcus —

      Right now, 2011-P dimes that have been worn are worth face value. At this point, it would probably take a long time for such a piece, minted in the hundreds of millions, to have any substantial value unless it has a scarce die variety. For example, Roosevelt dimes made 50 years ago, in 1965, are still worth less than a dollar in typical mint condition. So, indeed, it could take a very long time for most common coins today to attain significant collector value.

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
  18. Hi Joshua,
    I was going through a heap of old coins I found when I came across this 1968 Roosevelt dime and noticed it didn’t have an S or D on it. Could it be the rare no-S dime or is it just a regular old Philadelphia dime? Also, how can you tell them apart? Thanks in advance!

    Reply
    • Hi, Erik —

      Unfortunately it is just a regular Philadelphia-mint Roosevelt dime. But good catch, and keep on looking for those treasures. I assure you there are plenty floating around in circulation!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  19. Hi! Just found this coin in an old collection that was passed on to me. Is this one of the rare dimes? I so appreciate your insight!

    Reply
    • Hi, Janine —

      For some reason the photo isn’t blowing up on the comment page, though I do see a thumbnail of the obverse and reverse. May I ask what date your coin is, please? I can’t quite tell, though it appears 1967? If it’s 1967, then unfortunately, no — this is not a rare date. It’s worth face value if worn and about 20 cents in mint state condition.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Hi Joshua, it’s actually a 1968 coin. I’ve attached an imgur album so you can view the photos better. I’ve done some research and read some intriguing things about the 1968 coin so I’d appreciate you taking the time to look. Thanks! 🙂

        Link to photos: https://imgur.com/a/vCFnV

        Reply
        • Hello, Janine —

          I just checked the photos out. It looks like your Roosevelt dime has what appears to be either deep areas of luster or perhaps some type of mottling on the both the obverse and reverse.

          I blew up the obverse photos to see if by chance this might be a 1968 doubled die dime. You would see signs of minor doubling in the date and especially the “T” and “Y” of “LIBERTY.” I didn’t see any of this in the photos, but perhaps if you could get a slightly clearer shot of the obverse I might be able to tell. 1968 doubled die dimes are worth roughly $50.

          A nice, typical uncirculated Roosevelt dime from the era is worth approximately 20 cents.

          I hope this helps!

          Thank you for your question,
          Josh

          Reply
        • Janine,…………in case you haven’t realized it by now, your 1968 dime is a rare double die type. According to Joshua, it’s worth about $50.00

          Reply
  20. Hi Joshua I found a 2015 p dime that has been doubled on the date, in god we trust, and also liberty. You can clearly see the error with the naked eye do you think IT could be of any value? Also have a 2014p the Same way

    Reply
  21. Josh I have no knowledge of coin collecting. But I was rolling a bunch of change and decided to take a closer look at my dimes before rolling them. I found 1- 1968 no mint, 2- 1970 no mint, and 1- 1975 no mint. After a general Google search I found you and also some interesting facts about these coins. I was wondering if I should them looked at? Thank you

    Reply
    • Hi, June —

      It’s possible that there may be minute errors on these coins, though given the description, they sound like normal Philadelphia-Mint dimes that are worth face value. If you wish to upload photos, I would be glad to take a closer look!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  22. Josh, I have 196 something dime. The last number just is a “blob” and the strike is off. Can you give me your opinion

    Reply
      • Hey I have a 1975 dime with no mint mark. I also have 2 1967 dimes without mint marks. And a 1964 d quarter type c I believe. Would you mind taking a look at them and tell me what you think?

        Reply
        • Hi, Christian —

          If worn, your 1967 and 1975 Roosevelt dimes are worth face value. Your 1964-D quarter, however, is worth at least $4. I would need to please check (by clear photo) the relief on the reverse of the coin to ascertain type.

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
  23. I randomly went thru my coins I had tucked back for years and amazingly came across this fine gem.. how do I go about selling or autenicating it.?

    Reply
    • Hi!

      Your 1975 Philadelphia Roosevelt dime appears to have light circulation wear; while this classic coin is authentic, it’s also quite common and thus, in circulated grades, is worth face value.

      If 1975 is an important year for you, I suggest hanging onto the coin for the sake of sentimentality, but it isn’t a coin that would be worth your trouble selling if you’re looking to make much money from it.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  24. Joshua in going through a coin collection I came across 1986 mint set certified uncirculated with two sealed sleeves one has a Denver Mint tag with red edges containing: Kennedy Half ‘d’, Washington quarter ‘d’, a nickle, dime and penny all with ‘d’ marks. The other sleeve and tag is noted “Uncirculated Mint Set, Bureau of the Mint, Coin of the Philadelphia Mint & San Francisco Assay Office” this sleeve has blue edges top and bottom, it contains two pennies one ‘no mark’ and one ‘s’, a nickle ‘s’, a Washington quarter ‘no mark’ and a Roosevelt dime ‘no mint mark’.

    I am sure you know where this is going…. what I have not been able to verify is if the dime is a San Francisco missing ‘s’ or a Philadelphia minted dime. Any input would be helpful. The envelope and the return mailing address on the packaging is from the Treasury Department —- U. S. Assay Office in San Francisco. Thanks in advance.

    Reply
    • Hi, Joanne —

      Very interesting… Would you please submit a photo of this 1986 uncirculated set with a close-up, if possible, of the no-mintmark pieces? I’m intrigued…

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
        • Hi, Joanne!

          I just figured out why your uncirculated set has “S” mintmark coins in it – it’s from 1968, not 1986, as the earlier post seemed to state. No worries whatsoever, please!

          From 1968 through 1974 and in 1979-81, the United States Mint was striking San Francisco Mint coins for circulation. However, as only one or two denominations bore the “S” mintmark during those years, the U.S. Mint forewent putting the “S” coins in their own cellophane package and instead inserted those coins in the West Coast, or Denver, mint package. FYI, while the U.S. Mint struck S-mint Susan B. Anthony dollars in 1979, none were included in that year’s mint set.

          This may seem like an unusual practice today, but it was standard from the late ’60s through early ’80s, thus this is actually what a “normal” 1968 U.S. Mint uncirculated set looks like. This set, by the way, is worth around $6 given current silver values — the half dollar is 40% silver.

          Best,
          Josh

          P.S. While the U.S. Mint struck S-mint Susan B. Anthony dollars in 1979, none were included in that year’s mint set.

          Reply
          • Thanks for you reply — I was hoping the mint and proof sets would be the same I know the proof set with no ‘s’ dime is a sweet find. Thanks again.

          • You’re welcome, Joanne!

            U.S. proof sets made from 1968 on are sold in rigid plastic cases, which are distinctive from the cellophane and, more recently, pliable plastic blister packs that U.S. uncirculated sets are sold in.

            All the best,
            Josh

          • Just noticed this dime had silver on both sides. Is that common? Is it real? Worth anything?

          • Hi, Dana —

            That’s a textbook copper-nickel clad dime if ever I’ve seen one! I mean that in a good way, as many clad dimes have mushy, uneven-looking sandwiching. This is very nice. Not worth more than face value, but a cool piece that I’d hang onto anyway just for the sake of it.

            Nice find!
            Josh

    • Hi, Meo —

      A regular 1965 Roosevelt dime is worth 10 cents if it is worn and about 30 cents if it is uncirculated.

      Thank you for your question,
      Josh

      Reply
  25. Hi Joshua,

    Thanks for keeping this going! Total newbie here, just inspecting my pocket change. Found a 1987 dime with the P over the 8 in the date instead of the 7. I have another 1987 that looks normal (over the 7) and on a 1988 one the P is also over the last digit. Everything else looks normal about it. I can’t find anything about it after a few google searches… Do you have any additional info?

    Thanks!
    Jon

    Reply
    • Hi, Jon!

      Thank you for your support! It’s great that you’re enjoying the hobby and I look forward to seeing a photo of your coin so I can better assist you with what may be going on with your piece!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
        • Hi, Jon —

          It appears the top is off center by perhaps 3 percent; this is a rather common percentage of shift and is worth face value, but is nevertheless an interesting piece.

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
    • Hi, Jordan —

      The lack of a mintmark on a 1976 Roosevelt dime means it was made at the Philadelphia Mint. Likely the coin was found in circulation and thus it is worth face value.

      Thank you for your question!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Charles —

      This 1975 Roosevelt dime appears to have significant wear and even some post-mint damage, but I don’t see any evidence of errors in these two photographs. Unless there is something you see in-person on this coin that you would like me to investigate more closely, this piece should be safe to spend if you wish.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  26. Hi Joshua
    Please take a look at my dime which I found in some change but appears to be lightly circulated. It looks like there is an error on the front?

    Thanks

    Reply
    • Hello, Ben —

      I believe this may be a split die error. These are rare and aren’t as widely traded on the marketplace. I know some can be worth hundreds, though it would be wise to have your coin authenticated first to ensure a diagnosis and to rule out the possibility that this is post-mint damage.

      Thank you for your question and photos!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi,

      The photo gets blurry as I zoom in, but I believe I see signs of machine doubling; I’d be glad to re-examine the coin if a clearer photo could possibly be uploaded. If the coin does have machine doubling, as it’s worn, it is still worth face value. Still, it’s an interesting coin to hold aside.

      Thank you for your question!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi,

      From what I can tell in the photos, I don’t see any numismatic peculiarities except for the fact that both coins, especially the 1973-D, appear to have significant mint luster. Because they still contain some degree of wear and aren’t evident error coins or are scarce are worth face value.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi,

      Would you please resubmit a clearer photo of the 1986-P? I think I see what may be a doubled rim but I can’t ascertain for sure. This would be machine doubling and not worth anything over face as the coin is worn, but I want to be sure I am properly attributing your coin and can’t say for certain at this photo resolution. The other dimes show no evident errors, though I do see some rim doubling on the reverse of the dime on the left (not sure of its date) piece in the two images with two dime reverses. Coins with doubled rims of that relatively small degree aren’t usually worth more than face value if they are worn.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  27. Hi Joshua….again for a little time ago, Please, see the attached pictures of this 1983 D Dime I found in my all collection.
    Would You please tell me what is wrong with the edges that disappeared from the around this Dime ??
    Thanks in advance and Congratulations for this Excellent forum go forward !!!!!
    Regards,
    Esther.

    Reply
    • Hello, Esther —

      This is very interesting… I am very confident that this is post-mint damage, and most likely altered by tool or machine. While this piece shouldn’t be worth more than face value, I suggest you hang onto it and possibly have it evaluated in-hand by an error professional.

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
  28. Hello Joshua,

    Thanks for the quick reply, I didn’t know about this interesting note about my 1983 D Dime.
    If I have any results evaluated in-hand by an error professional I will let You know.
    Again, Thank You so much and Congratulations for ALL the didactic instructional review in this EXCELLENT forum.

    Esther.

    Reply
    • Hello, Esther!

      Thank you so much for your kind comments! They’re very much appreciated!

      I look forward to hearing back from you on the status of the dime!

      Good luck,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Chris —

      It looks like your coin has some extra wear or light damage on the lower left side, but it doesn’t appear to have any die anomaly. This piece, given that it is 90% silver, is worth about $2 to $2.25.

      Thank you for your question and photo!
      Josh

      Reply
  29. I have to say that this article is misleading. 1949 s roosevelt dimes in choice uncirculated condition go for right around $35-40. Any pre 1964 dime in uncirculated condition go for between$ 3 and 10. The only thing this article really covers is the value of error coins. I am an avid coin collector, and member of the ANA

    Reply
    • HI, Jareth —

      I appreciate your feedback on this older article. It looks like it needs to be updated since it was written several years ago. Thank you for your insights and happy collecting!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Lorenzo —

      Yes, this is a 1975 Roosevelt dime with no mintmark, as you keenly pointed out. However, it is not the 1975 no-S proof Roosevelt dime. That coin is a collector piece that has mirror-like surfaces and was designed for collectors. This is a 1975 Philadelphia dime (prior to 1980, Philadelphia dimes did not contain a mintmark), and it’s worth face value.

      Keep checking your change — errors and varieties really are floating around in circulation just waiting to be found. Keep up the great work in looking at the details on your coins.

      Good luck,
      Josh

      Reply
  30. I have a 2015 Roosevelt p dime with date , in god we trust and mint mark is all double struck. Can anyone tell me the possible value. Thanks.

    Reply
  31. I have a 2016 Shawnee quarter coin with an extra piece of metal just on the top of the rocks. It looks like another rock. Do you think it can be have some value?

    Reply
  32. Hi Joshua Im new and have found several penny’s 1969 s and weird looking 1979 D dime,,, I would like your opinion on this within my findings I’ll send picture to you personally if you reply back..thanks

    Jay

    Reply
    • Hi, Cheng —

      Your 1970 Roosevelt dime is worn and therefore worth face value.

      Thank you for your question and photos,
      Josh

      Reply
  33. Hi Joshua, just a question . . . How do you tell the difference between the 1968 No S and the Philadelphia issue which had no mint mark either? Would the mirror finish of the 1968 No S not wear off if someone had decided to use it for circulation instead of for a collection?

    Reply
    • Hello, Tudor –

      The chances that one of the very few 1968 no-S proof dimes would have been released into circulation are infinitesimally tiny, but it’s still good to know there are a few strike differences between a business strike and a proof coin. These include sharper details (which would be seen even on a lightly to moderately worn proof coin) and a squarer rim on the proofs. Unless you see your dime has any of those characteristics, it might be good to know that a 1968 Philadelphia dime with wear is worth face value.

      Thank you for your question!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Travian —

      Given that all circulating Lincoln cents made since mid 1982 are made from copper-plated zinc planchets, I believe what you have here is a regular 1985 Lincoln cent with some of its copper worn away. Presuming this to be the case, and give the fact that the coin is circulated, it’s worth face value.

      If you can provide a weight for the coin, I’d be glad to weigh in further. A normal 1985 Lincoln cent should weigh 2.5 grams. Anything significantly more or less might suggest a different planchet type, and thus an off-metal error.

      Fingers crossed,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Daniel –

      Do you mean full bands/fasces reverse? Uncirculated — all details present? What do mean by full reverse (I’m sorry)…

      If the 1997 dime has any wear at all, it’s worth face value. I’d be happy to rake a look at photos of the coin and assist further.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Christine –

      Judging on the wear throughout the rest of the design, I’m inclined to say the rim has also seen extensive wear and thus appears nearly obliterated.
      I have seen other heavily worn Roosevelt dimes with deep wear to similar effect, and I think this is what’s going on here. This being the case, based on what I see here, the coin would be worth face value.

      Thank you for your questions and photos,
      Josh

      Reply
  34. Hello
    I have a 1983 D in near mint condition, that is bronze, thinner and lighter than other dimes. What would be the best strategy to get this appraised or can you suggest a value.

    Reply
    • Hi, Lynn —

      Would you mind kindly posting a photo of the 1983-D dime so I can further assist?

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Rodrigo —

      This is a toughie… It seems like damage but I can’t tell for sure without seeing the coin in-hand.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply

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