5 Popular Wheat Penny Error Coins

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It seems everybody likes collecting Lincoln wheat pennies.

Holding a wheat penny.

Wheat cents, which were last made in 1958, show the familiar image of President Lincoln on the obverse and 2 stalks of wheat, signifying prosperity, on the reverse.

While tens of millions of these Lincoln wheat pennies were made without flaw from 1909 to 1958, there were several which ended up with errors that eventually turned them into valuable and sought-after collectibles.

Let’s take a look at 5 of the most popular wheat penny error coins.

5 Lincoln Wheat Penny Error Coins

wheat-penny-error-coins-photo-by-homini.jpg

Coin collectors love error coins — they, after all, are proof in the pudding that even the United States Mint isn’t always perfect!

Beyond imperfections, though, something that makes error coins so valuable is that they’re often quite scarce.

Now, for all intents and purposes, there is some disagreement about what exactly makes an error coin.

Some suggest that any modification to the die that was unintentional is an error; others call these varieties. Those which call die modifications errors normally restrict the term error to coins that were misstruck.

For the purpose of this article, I’ll refer to errors as any coin that was either misstruck or the result of a die that was modified with inadvertent results.

1922 Plain Cent

For the only time during the Lincoln cent series, Denver was the only mint to strike pennies. However, debris collecting in the mintmark of a worn die caused the U.S. Mint to attempt repairing the die with abrasives. The process essentially removed any trace of the D mintmark on some coins.

It was automatically assumed by many that the brand new 1922 pennies without mintmarks were made in Philadelphia. When the United states Mint confirmed that the Denver mint was the only facility that year to strike pennies, the 1922 plain error was born.

While error coins aren’t usually included in standard coin albums and coin books, a hole for the 1922 plain cent is usually a customary addition because it was long assumed by many coin collectors that the 1922 plain cent was the Philadelphia version of the 1922 issue. In fact, many people held it aside for that very reason.

There are 4 types of 1922 cents:

  • 1922-D
  • 1922 weak D
  • 1922 No-D weak reverse
  • 1922 No-D strong reverse

Of the 4 types, the most desired 1922 cent is the 1922 No-D strong reverse (also called die pair #2). This variety costs around $700 in grades of Good; prices easily climb into the $1000s for coins in lesser states of wear.

1955 Doubled Die

The 1955 doubled die penny is as popular a Lincoln cent error as the 1922 plain cent — if not more so.

This hot little error coin quickly was discovered by numismatists in the day. Ever since, the demand for this coin has been through the roof. A doubled die is caused not by doubling on the die of the coin — not doubling of the strike.

Because of that several thousand 1955 doubled die cents managed to escape into circulation.

The 1955 doubled die penny is sometimes included in Lincoln cent collections, though it’s not necessary as it is not considered a regular-strike variety. Still, many coin collectors want an example of this error in their collection and won’t mind paying the $1,500+ for a specimen in Very Fine or better.

1943 Copper Penny

OK, so here it is: it’s not the 1943 silver penny or 1943 steel penny (both are the same coin, but many people mistake the steel for silver) but, rather the 1943 copper penny that’s so rare and valuable!

The simple test is that, if your 1943 penny sticks to a magnet, it’s not a bronze penny and, therefore, not rare. However, if your coin doesn’t stick to a magnet, it’s worth getting authenticated to see if it’s the real deal.

About 40 of the 1943 bronze pennies were struck by accident; presumably, some copper planchets were left behind in reserves and were fed into the presses.

The 1943 copper penny is much more valuable than the 1909-S VDB penny. Even back in 1981, a 1943 bronze cent sold for $10,000! Today, these coins routinely bring in over $100,000.

1944 Steel Penny

Just as some 1943 cents were accidentally struck in copper, some 1944 pennies were made with zinc-coated steel, just like most 1943 pennies.

With only a few 1944 steel cents known to exist, these coins are truly rare.

Grade dictates how much each 1944 steel cent sells for, though minimum values range right around $30,000. In 2008, a 1944-S steel cent in gem uncirculated sold for $374,000, making it the most valuable Lincoln cent ever sold at the time.

1959-D Lincoln Wheat Cent

Remember how we said the Lincoln wheat cent was made from 1909 to 1958? True, those are the official years of production. But there appears to have been an error of some sort that resulted in the striking of a very tiny number of 1959-D wheat pennies.

While the Lincoln Memorial appeared on Lincoln cents from 1959 through 2008, these 1959-D Lincoln wheat pennies have been a curiosity for quite some time.

Though their authenticity has been questioned by more than a few individuals, the Secret Service has confirmed some of these as being real coins.

The origin of the error is presently unknown. What is known, though, is that the 1959-D Lincoln wheat cent has drawn plenty of attention as a true numismatic oddity.

Here’s a video I made showing lots of valuable old pennies:


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753 thoughts on “5 Popular Wheat Penny Error Coins”

  1. I really enjoyed reading the infomation. I always asked arounded about the coins, I have save just because I found them very unusal! I have some other coins in my safe that put away for safe keeping. Thanks for the info……. I am going to keep reading on my coins.

    Reply
    • Hi, Cynthia —

      Thank you so much for the feedback! Please always feel free to ask questions here at The Fun Times Guide to Coins. Don’t forget about the search engine, located near the top of each page here, to look for more info about your coins in our growing library of articles and posts.

      Reply
  2. Thanks for the info. I have an unusual 1973 penny I found while sorting my copper coins from zinc. The back looks normal but the front looks like it was struck twice with the back-side die after Lincoln’s head was struck. The result is two half circles to the left and right of Lincoln’s bust. These half circles clearly show the Lincoln Memorial and the words are reversed. Does this sound valuable?
    Thanks.

    Reply
  3. HI JOSHUA, I HAVE SEVERAL GEM 1954 S PENNIES AND THE [S] IS ALMOST UNDERNEATH THE 5 INSTEAD OF BETWEEN THE 9 & 5,ALSO THE [S] IS TILTED SLITE TO THE RIGHT AT THE TOP OF IT. CAN YOU TELL ME IF THIS COIN HAS ANY VALUE AND IS THIS CONCIDER AN ERROR COIN GREG!!!.

    Reply
    • Hi, Greg —

      While it’s not really an error coin per se, if you look at enough mintmarked Lincoln cents, especially those made up through the 1950s and 1960s, you’ll notice sometimes considerable variations in the placement of the mintmarks. This is due to the mintmarks being individually placed on the dies (the device that actually puts an image on coins) in those days.

      Reply
  4. Hi, I have a 1944 wheat penny. The nine in the date is kind of open and it goes straight down below the rest of the date and then has a straight line that goes off to the right making it look like a giant 2. Any value? Thanks, Luckie

    Reply
    • Luckie,

      If you would, please post a photo here in the comments forum so we can see exactly what we’re dealing with here! Thanks!

      Reply
  5. I have a 1917 Lincoln wheat penny there’s no l and a very faint i. I also have a 1998d penny that’s falling apart. the face is rotting out and the sides. Lincoln has no nose and chin there’s a chunk on the top where the t should be in trust. Can you tell me if their worth anything

    Reply
    • Diana,

      Your 1917 penny sounds like a weak strike, which is a pretty common situation among those early Lincoln cents. Your coin is worth about 10 to 25 cents in typical, worn grades.

      As for the 1998-D, I don’t know if it’s extra cruddy from debris or looks the way it does due to an error. If you would, please provide a photo or two of it and post it here in the comments forum, we might be able to help.

      Reply
    • Yes, those are the intials of the artist that designed the picture, found on lower shoulder of lincoln. You can also see the intials of the artist that designed the otherside of the penny showing the lincoln memorial lower right side of steps I believe. You can google these facts and they also list them in the penny collector books. 

      Reply
  6. have found  1953 penny with (one cent) on back backward and part of united states backwards also has de of united and has ats  of states and united sates on top

    Reply
  7. I have a 1958 wheat penny that has a really bizarre flaw.   It’s hard to explaini but here goes.   On the front of the coin, starting right below Lincoln’s hair line, is a silver circular spot right in the middle of the coin and about 1/8 inch in diameter and it is a picture of part of a building you see on the back of a new penny.   The building is sort of embossed on Lincoln’s head, in other words, and it is silver.   Is it valuable – other than 1 cent?   Thanks  

    Reply
  8. What do you do if a Coin shop that Took your Wheat Penny on consighnment and about a Week later because My Phone calls were not Answerd I went down to where the Store was and it was CLOSED !
    The Coin showed up on E-bay 6 Years Later and When I made Inquires it was Taken off the Market and I Could not find the Seller. — it was a VDB 190(Filled 9) in VG Condition

    Reply
    •  Everett,

      That’s a terrible situation! The only recourse you may have is the contact the Better Business Bureau in the town where the coin shop was located and make a report against the shop owner.

      All the best…

      Reply
  9. Hello Josha I have a 1943 MS68 wheat penny its authenic by anicoins.com,i tried a magnet but its in a seal case and the magnet didnt pick it up i dont know it it didnt cause its in a seal case or what ,now what should i do to see if this is copper or steal  thanks

    Reply
    • Hi, Darrell,

      I’d leave the coin in the slab, if it were copper, you’d notice it by its color – it would have the same color/appearance as a copper penny.

      Reply
  10. I have a wheat penny with “194 ” as the date missing the fourth digit.  It has been confirmed that it is a mis-stamped coin.  Can you give me any information about this coin. 

    Reply
    • Alton,

      Wheat pennies with filled dies are relatively common errors and commonly worth between $1 and $10 based on the condition of the coin.

      Reply
  11. My son has been collecting pennies recently and we were looking thru a roll of pennies and stumbled across, what seems to say 1985 as the year and on the lincoln side you see another indent of the lincoln memorial from the back side. it looks as if both sides were struck on one side. Has anyone seen this before? I have been reading alot about doubleing and mistricks but havn’t read anything about them stricking the penny with both side on one side. Any feedback would be grately appreciated. I want to know if this is rare or valuable or if its just really neat to have. Thank you.

    Reply
    • You have some sort of a novelty coin that really isn’t worth anything to a coin collector, but may be worth a couple dollars to somebody interested in such curiosities.

      Reply
  12. found a wheat penny dated 19?? it is a mistruck – because the wheat is moved over with sides curved and the other side is totally flat.  Any one with any ideas???

    Reply
  13. Hey, my dad and I were looking through a new bag of pennies we got. He pulled out a 1941s and the back has nothing on it. When I say nothing, it looks as if the penny was not even struck. Just a smooth flat back with a regular front. Has anyone ever heard of this before? I know there are blank planchets but this has the face struck with the date and no back at all.

    Reply
    • Hi, Kyle,

      Under normal minting circumstances, it is essentially impossible for a coin to be struck on only one side, so it sounds like you may have a novelty coin – a real 1941-S penny that had been altered by a private party.

      If you’d like, feel free to post a pic here for us to further verify your coin.

      Thanks!

      Reply
  14. Just found – 1898 + 1903 wheat penny’s – great condition and a multi colored 1879 silver dollar.  Anyone have any ideas on these

    Reply
    • The 1898 and 1903 Indian Head pennies are each worth around $1 to $2 in typical worn grades. The 1879 Morgan dollar was painted after it left the U.S. Mint and is worth it’s silver value – around $30 with current bullion values.

      Reply
  15. I have a 1909-s VDB that I made the mistake of cleaning. I was very careful in how I cleaned it no rubbing it with anything. How much did will I loose on the value?

    Reply
  16. You Should have Left the ” Patena ” or Naturial Oxidation it . — Cleaned by any Means reduces its Value by 25 – 50 %, But if you want to Know the True Value then take it to a Store that is Reputable and has been Busness for a While, Check with the B.B.B. –Do your Home Work !

    Reply
  17. Josh Hello,  I have found a 1952-S Wheat Penny, what makes it so unique is that the 5 is stamped over a 1 in the date. Can you help me with your opinion on the penny and some information about the coin possibly?  Thank you Brannon

    Reply
    • Hi, Brannon –

      Thanks for your question. Would you please post a pic of your coin here in the forum so we can figure out what might be going on there. Thanks!

      Reply
    • Micah,

      Only two are known to exist. If you think you found a 1958 doubled die penny, I would have it certified by a reputable authentication company, such as PCGS to verify that it is real. If it is, I would contact an auction company, perhaps Teletrade, and offer it for sale. Such coins can be as much as $100,000.

      Here’s some more info on third party coin grading: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

      Reply
  18. John    I have found these pennies of Lincoln smoking a cigar a pipe also a heart with a baseball player and other pictures stamped on the penny Worth anything?

    Reply
    • Hi, Jake –

      You have common types of counterstamped Lincoln cents that were altered by individuals after the coins left the U.S. Mint. They may be worth a small amount 50 cents to $1 or so interested collectors but aren’t at all rare and really have no numismatic value.

      Reply
  19. hello I have a 1943 steel  wheat penny i test it with a magnet so does that mean it not worth anything, also i have a 2009 penny with Lincoln’s
    life depicts him as a young professional standing in front of the state capitol
    building in Springfield.is that worth anything

    Reply
    • A 1943 steel cent is worth around 25 cents, and your 2009 Lincoln bicentennial cent is worth only face value if worn.

      Reply
    • A 1943 steel cent is worth around 25 cents, and your 2009 Lincoln bicentennial cent is worth only face value if worn.

      Reply
  20. I have a penny with 194 written on it the last number is missing. It does not stick to a magnet. Could this penny be worth anything, it doesn’t look like the number wore off but was left out.

    Reply
    • Ambar,

      It’s possible that either your penny was weakly struck or part of the die (the device which strikes the image) was filled,or somebody may have removed the last digit. In either case,there is no added monetary value to your coin.

      Reply
    • Ambar,

      It’s possible that either your penny was weakly struck or part of the die (the device which strikes the image) was filled,or somebody may have removed the last digit. In either case,there is no added monetary value to your coin.

      Reply
  21. JOSHAU, MY BROTHER FOUND A 14-D PENNY. THE DATE AND MINT CAN BE SEEN ON IT. FRONT IN BETTER CONDITION THAN BACK BUT CAN SEE THE WHEAT STALKS AND WORDING. IT IS ALMOST SMOOTH O0N BACK STILL AS I SAID THE WORDING ,WHEAT STALKS, E.C.T. CAN STILL BE SEEN ALSO SAME WITH THE FRONT ONLY FRONT ISN’T AS SMOOTH. I’VE READ IT IS WORTH UP TO TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS EVEN IN POOR CONDITION, IS THIS TRUE.    THANK YOU, BARBARA

    Reply
    • Trix,

      Yes, it’s true that a well worn 1914-D Lincoln cent is worth around $150 to $200 (and up), but if your coin is bent, cleaned, has holes, heavy nicks, or other damage, it will be worth much less. Be wary as many pennies that appear to be a 1914-Dare actually fakes. It would be wise to have your coin authenticated to ensure it is the real deal. Here’s some more info on third party coin grading: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

      Reply
  22. i have a 1966 silver in color penny with a masonic emblem stamped in it, could you tell me if its worth anything?

    Reply
  23. I have a 1975 penny that only has the front printed. The back is very smooth with a few “cut” marks in it. There is nothing that shows this penny anywhere that I have found. Where can I find more info on it and what would it be worth? Thanks

    Reply
  24. Emc,

    Sounds like you 1975 penny may have been altered and that’s why it looks that way. If altered, it has no value.

    Reply
  25. i have a 1949 wheat penny and it seems it has a die error strike at the 9 and 4 between 19:49 like theres half of a 9 and half of a 4. thanks, would like to know how much its worth.

    Reply
    • David,

      What you have is a regular 1975 penny that was counterstamped after it U.S. Mint. It doesn’t really have any value besides face value.

      Reply
    • Dr. Nsanford –

      Sounds like you have an off-center penny. With approximately 50-60 percent off center, your coin is probably worth around $20 to $30.

      Reply
    • CST,

      Mint made errors like that are virtually impossible due to the striking process, so it must be a magician’s coin or another type of novelty piece. Such coins really don’t have any numismatic value, but may be worth a few dollars to an illusionist or novelty coin collector.

      Reply
  26. I have 2 roll of wheat pennies dating from 1938 to1958. Do you think there is any value in them. I was about to throw them out.

    Reply
  27. I have a 1957 d wheat penny that looks silver , I checked it with a magnet but it does’t stick could you plz tell what this could be? Thankyou

    Reply
    • Yanna,

      Sounds like somebody plated your one-cent coin in pewter, silver, or perhaps mercury. Such a piece is considered altered and has no extra value over face.

      Reply
    • Bradley,

      Your 2009 cent is worth face value, while the 1957 Lincoln cent is worth around 3 to 5 cents.

      Reply
  28. i have a 1993 penny that is completely gold in color, i fond it a few years ago and now im looking at my coins again

    Reply
    • Cameron,

      It’s great to hear you’ve found a renewed interest in coins! Your 1993 one-cent coin may be gold colored due to a chemical reaction, or perhaps somebody gold-plated it after it left the mint. Either way, while it really has no numismatic value in the monetary sense, it is still an interesting find wort holding on to!

      Reply
    • OK i have another question- do you know anything about Chinese coins? if you do i can describe them for you. I have Googled them(I think they might be counterfeit) and i have only been able to find 2 out of 7. 

      Reply
      • Hi, Cameron –

        While we are not experts on Chinese coins, perhaps we can help you find the info you need if you post a pic of the coins you are curious about here and we can help in researching them for you.

        Reply
  29. i found a penny that is normal in the front but weird in the back it the words look normal but there is a building with a man standing there?? Is it worth anything?

    Reply
  30. i have a double head lincoln penny. one side is 1961, the other is 1962. how do i find out if it’s worth anything?

    Reply
    • Christy,

      Such a piece is actually made up by an individual who fused two Lincoln cents together; such a mint error isn’t possible. A novelty coin like that may be worth a couple dollars to a collector interested in such curiosities.

      Reply
    • George,

      Your coin isn’t an actual error but, rather, a novelty coin of some sort – most likely part of an illusionist’s gaffe piece. Such pieces don’t really have much monetary value; perhaps it’s worth a couple dollars to somebody who collects such pieces.

      Reply
  31. Hi I have several wheat pennies my friend said to clean the with orange juice. How much how I hurt the value of my coins? I also have a 1985 lincon penny and he’s nose has what looks like extra metal on it, there is what looks like a small hole on the rim by liberty and on the back there is a hole in the stairs is this worth any thing? ty

    Reply
    • Hi, Joy –

      Don’t clean them! Doing so will hurt the value by as much as 50 percent or more and will ruin perfectly good coins. The holes in the case of the 1985 Lincoln cent renders the coin damaged and thus, only worth face value.

      Reply
    • Hi, Joy -‘

      Without seeing the coin it’s hard to say if it is just circulation wear or a misstrike that would cause the weak image, but at any rate the coin is likely worth only 2 or 3 cents, especially because of the cleaning.

      Reply
    • Laura,

      It sounds like your 1953-D Lincoln cent was probably coated in mercury, silver, or pewter, which makes it an altered coin. Such pieces are really only worth face value.

      Reply
  32. I have a 1920 Lincoln Cent that has a “LARGE” # 2 stamped on the reverse. It pretty much covers the entire back of coin..If anybody can tell me any information about this coin would be greatly appreciated.

    Reply
  33. I have a 1973 penny with a smaller Kennedy face above the year facing president Lincoln.  Is this
    something that was engraved as an afterthought?

    Reply
  34. i found 2008 new mexico quarter that has 2 lumps on it the middle of the coin on each side is raised with a almost hump looking feature . anyone else picked one of these up

    Reply
  35. Hi, Chris-

    Would you please post a pic of your coin here in the comments forum so we can better determine what’s up with your coin? Thanks!

    Reply
  36. I got a 1909 S Wheat penny, you can clearly see the S and V.D.B. . Very nice shape, just wondering, how much its worth?

    Reply
    • Coin Finder,

      Assuming it’s authentic, that’s a terrific find! Value start at a minimum of $950-$1,000 for 1909-S VDB cent in a grade of Good-4 that is undamaged and not cleaned and go up from there.

      Reply
  37. i have this nickel in which the minting mark is on top of the building on the back side instead of the front next to Jefferson or whoever is supposed to be on it. Any idea how much it is worth? My dad thinks 40 cents…..

    Reply
  38. I also have this wheat penny that is so worn down all i can see is: Lincoln’s head, barely the word liberty, the wheat, and the words one cent. Even what i can see is barely readable. It is also ALOT lighter than a regular penny (a regular wheat head). I am seriously puzzeld by wen it is from.

    Reply
  39. I have a 1934 US penney that has no back, It is hollow in back, with a normal front. Does this coin have any value? Thanks

    Reply
    • Hi, John –

      Sounds like your 1934 Lincoln cent was altered to become an illusionist’s coin; such a piece really has no monetary value to coin collectors.

      Reply
    • Hi, Mike –

      Great question, though there really are no coins from 1977 (at least from the United States) that could be considered rare, per se. If you are looking to buy 1977 coinage in commemoration of a special event, you might want to buy a 1977 U.S. proof set. These cost around $5 to $10 and feature the one cent coin, nickel, dime, quarter, half dollar, and dollar coin in a special, mirror0like finish with high-quality strike. Here’s some more info on proof sets: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/mint_sets_proof_sets/

      Reply
  40. There was an estate sale of an old ‘error coin’ guy who died, whose collection was distributed on eBay. I made a few small bids as a kind of curious investment gamble and won some error pennies without knowing what the descriptions on the coins labels mean. The seller did not know their meaning either, and the owner who wrote them is dead. The labels & tape on the sealed rolls is VERY old, so I know these are not a scam of anyone recently. Since I’m unfamiliar with error coins enough to know which is the best book or resource to turn to for figuring out if what I bought was pure junk or something of worth, what do you think the following terms mean?
    1) 1968-S BU Lincoln Cracked Skull
    2) 1968-S BU Doubled Reverse L7B
    3) 1965 BU Spiked Head
    4) 1963-D BU Lincoln Cracked Skull, Barker, 63DP 19
    5) 1963-D BU Lincoln Rev DB + Mound in field / East of Vru?? (last word unreadable)
    6) 1960-D SD Unc Fidoes
    7) 1958-P BU Ghost of Lincoln
    8) 1956 Upper 1/2 BIE, DC VDB – Rim
    9) 1955/5 and 1953/3
    10) 1953-S AU Lincoln Ghost
    11) 1954-S Low 5 1/4 fill – VF+ – DB’s 1 and 9, S touches 5
    12) 1951-S, 1937, 1918, and 1923 Fidoes
    I’m most curious about the term ‘Ghost’ because I cannot see a ghost, but then again my eyes aren’t so good… Thanks in advance for anyone’s help with these.

    Reply
  41. I recently found a rather odd 1984 Lincoln cent that had small round circles, most with hollow cores, on both obverse and reverse of coin with no particular pattern or uniformity. Has anyone else came across one of these yet? I have yet to gain a clue to what these random. “crop circles”could possibly be. HELP!!!!

    Reply
    • Bitty –

      A 1941 Lincoln cent is worth around 5 cents. Your does not stick to a magnet because it is made of copper, which is not a magnetic metal.

      Reply
  42. My friend and one more thing, How much approximately will be No date 1 cent type 2 blank weight 3.12 grams lincoln cent. Thanks Art

    Reply
    • Hi, Roman –

      Your 1962 Lincoln cent was likely gold-plated by somebody who finds that year particularly special for some reason. The value of the gold is nominal – likely under 50 cents to $1.

      Reply
  43. i have a 1944 steel penny it sticks to a magnet the bank gave me a roll of pennies and it was full of wheat pennies from 1910 to 1958 i have 50 of them in total but one sticks to a magnet are they worth much

    Reply
    • Lynn,

      What is the weight of your coin? If it’s more than a bout 3.1 grams, it has been coated with a magnetic metal; 3.1 grams, by the way, is the weight of a normal copper Lincoln cent.

      Reply
  44. I have a penny that has two lincolns mirrored, two “In God We Trust” and two different dates. One is 1953 D and the other is 1945 D (mirrored). This penny also does not have a back on it. It is slightly larger than a normal penny. Does it have any value?

    Reply
    • LMH,

      This is an illusionist’s coin; it is strictly a novelty coin and really has no monetary value to most coin collectors.

      Reply
    • Aaron,

      Your 1927-D and 1928-D Lincoln cents are worth around 15 to 20 cents each is they are in nice, but worn condition.

      Reply
  45. Hi I found a 1949 penny with a straight nine in the second nine. Every other 1949 I have the nine curves under. It’s almost like the back side of a 7 but more straight down like a 1. Has anyone else seen one similar? Could it be worth more than a couple cents?

    Reply
    • I have a 1939 that has the same variation. The second 9s leg doesn’t curve – it’s straight like a 7, but I can’t find report of this variation anywhere. Is it a strike error?

      Reply
  46. i have a 1964 silver dime no mint mark is that normal. i also have a few wheat pennys and in the phrase in god we trust u can clearly see that the E in we is set lower than the rest of the letters also both Ts in trust one is set lower one is set higher but both of them are to small compared to the rest of the letters are these worth any thing.thanks

    Reply
  47. I have a 2009 penny minted in Denver with a building other than the Lincoln Memorial on the back. Is it genuine or has it been “messed with”?

    Reply
  48. I have a 1958 D penny with the “1” looking like it’s mirror image. Another words the ones are normally just straight vertical strokes, my number one looks like “1”, except the curved part of the one at the top is pointed in the opposite direction. Is this a misprint, is it worth anything?

    Thanks,

    Reply
  49. I have a 1914 wheat penny, but it has no D…or is worn? How else would I be able to tell if it is the rare one? Of since I can’t tell about the D, is it worth anything extra w/o the D? Thanks in advance!

    Reply
    • Hi, Curious –

      A 1914 Lincoln cent without the “D” (Denver) is a coin that was made at the Philadelphia mint (which does not put a mintmark on one-cent coins). A 1914 is not the rarest variety of the date and is, in fact, the most common. However, it’s still worth 50 cents to $1.

      Reply
  50. hi, i found a 1923-s lin. whty., good condition, the mint mark is tripled (-s-), the first one is faded,the second is the mint mark,the third is more visible then the first, checked under micro., still wondering if it`s me?

    Reply
    • Hi,

      Would you please post a picture of this coin here in the forum so we can see what’s going on? It may be some type of variety or it could have been altered. Thanks!

      Reply
  51. I have a 1953 wheat back penny that looks to be mis-struck. …it is shiny like a dime and also the “silver” color…on the side though you can see the copper..And it is heavier then a regular penny….Any ideas on what I have here … Thank you, Angela

    Reply
    • Robert,

      You may have a coin that resulted due to a die clash, when both the obverse and reverse dies come together by accident because there wasn’t a blank coin (called a planchet) between them. What then happens is the dies imprint images on each other, and then coins struck by these damaged dies show images of both the front and back designs. A Lincoln cent such as yours could be worth between $5 and $10.

      Reply
    • Hi, Alicia –

      It sounds like you have a type of novelty coin that was made by an enterprising individual who slathered together two reverse sides of real Lincoln wheat cents and made a coin out of it. These usually serve as gag pieces and illusionists’ coins.

      Reply
  52. hello i have pennies from the year 1941 to 1960 could you please give me a general idea of how much i could sell them for thanks

    Reply
  53. I have a coin collection of liberty head dimes dating from 1917-1945. Approx. 56 of them total. How can I determine if these are of value.

    Reply
  54. Hi Joshua,
    I have a collection of wheat pennies that passed down to me after my father passed this year. He had a great love for collecting coins. When I was a child, I used to give him rare coins that I would come across as well because I knew he loved them so much. After reading your blog, I looked through the wheat pennies and discovered that I have 3 wheat pennies with the year 1944. One of the pennies have a letter beheath the year which looks like an “s”. How can I find out if this is a steel 1944 wheat penny; as well as find out the value for it? Thank you for your expertise!

    Reply
  55. I have a 1944 with no mint marker penny, a couple 1969 pennies, the first one the mint marker looks like just a dot and the other there is no mint marker, a couple 1959 pennies, one is a denver mint and the other doesn’t have one. I also have a 1972 where it looks slightly doubled around the chest area and the face, and also a 84 where the ear looks possibly doubled. Then I have a 1941, 1918, and a 1997 no mint marker that looks like the nose is larger. can you tell me if any are worth anything?

    Reply
    • Hi, Katy –

      Your 1918 Lincoln cent is worth around 20 cents while your 1918, 1941, and 1944 Lincoln cents are each worth around 3 to 5 cents. Except for the 1972 and 1984 possible doubled die Lincoln cents, the rest that you listed are worth face value.

      Now, if your 1972 Lincoln cent is a doubled die, it is worth around $180 to $200, while the 1984 Lincoln cent, if doubled, is worth around $75 to $100.

      For more information about the value of your Lincoln cents, check out these pages:

      Lincoln Memorial cent values: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/lincoln_penny/

      Lincoln wheat cent cent values: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/wheat_pennies/

      Reply
      • I have found a wheat back penny that is a 1953 looks like its is steel it has a rime around the coin with no groves in it any one with info let me know thanks all so no mint mark

        Reply
        • Edward,

          It sounds like you have a pewter-coated Lincoln cent that was once incorporated into a piece of jewelry.

          Reply
    • Hi, Matthew –

      The dropped “e” in “we” is a variety I’ve seen on several Lincoln cents; as far as I know, I’ve never seen any premium value placed on these.

      Reply
  56. I have a penny but it has no stamps on it… not a face a building or anything and its not worn that much …hardly at all l… is it worth anything???

    Reply
  57. I have a lincoln wheat penny, the third number in the printed date is missing and it has no mint mark, is this penny worth anything? also a 1953 wheat penny D

    Reply
    • Hi, Kellie –

      It’s quite common for a digit in the date of an older coin like yours to have either been struck by a filled or weak die or intentionally removed by a bored individual. It’s hard to say without seeing the coin which of the two cases it was. If you don’t see any scratches or gouges in the area of the missing digit, it’s likely that the culprit was a filled die. In that case, your coin would have a nominal value over face and would likely be an item of interest to a collector of error coins.

      Your 1953-D Lincoln cent is worth around 3 to 5 cents.

      Reply
  58. I have a 1953 S Wheat Penny that the top of the 9 is filled in (like a bubble)… is this an error coin and how much would it be worth?

    Reply
    • Hi, Teresa –

      This was probably caused by a die issue; these types of errors can be worth from roughly $5 to $10 or more based on the grade of the coin.

      Reply
  59. I have a 1958 d penny and it looks normal except the date. The 1 is actually a 1 and not a straight line and it is backwards. I can’t find any information about this type of error, if it is an error. Any ideas?

    Reply
  60. i have a 1952 D mint penny which looks normal but then i also have one of the same but on this one the mint mark is touching the bottom of the number 5. the date and the mint are closer together than on the other. would this be considered an error? and if so whats the value of this coin?

    Reply
  61. I have a 1943 steel penny that is missing the 4! The other numbers are perfectly clear. Was this a very common ? Is it worth much? I would appreciate any info, I have not done the magnet test yet…thanks.

    Reply
    • Hi, Kevin –

      It sounds like your coin was either weakly struck or perhaps altered by somebody outside of the U.S. Mint. Such a coin isn’t really worth more than usual (about 10 cents to a dollar) but is definitely a spectacle to hold in the hand.

      Reply
      • Thank you for your reply, just have to add, when looking at it thru a loop you can see the 4 was never struck, the 1 9. & 3 are sharp, with the zink plating having the same surface including where the 4 should of been.

        Reply
        • Hi, Kevin –

          Thanks for the follow-up info; perhaps you could provide a photo here in the forum so we can take a closer look. You may have a coin that was struck by a filled die.

          Reply
          • Kevin,

            Thank you for the detailed photo. It looks like the “R” in “LIBERTY” may be pretty soft, too. Given the coin seems to have a little corrosion (which is usually the case with worn steel cents, since the metal is highly prone to rusting), it is difficult to tell if that may have had any influence on the appearance of the absent-looking “4” in the date. Though, I think it is possible that it may not have been struck at all due to a filled die, this opinion absent my checking the coin out with a 10X loupe. I believe if the filled die is the case, your coin may be worth a slight premium, perhaps a couple dollars.

          • I have about 20 something 1943 steel pennies,,and the date shows,,, 194 …I used a magnifier with a light,,compared it to the rest of the pennies,,theres just no 3 on it,,not worn either in my opinion because the 194 are clearly seen, risen and no flaw where it should be, also,,theres no T at the end of trust. IN GOD WE TRUS … I’ve been on the computer now for a few hrs.seeking info.about this particular 194 (1943) penny. glad to see someone else has wonders. any more info?

          • Hi, Nicole –

            Without seeing a photo of the coin it is hard to say for certain, but I would suggest that the cause of the missing “3” may be an overly worn die. That would result in an absent “3” without any evident tampering being seen on that area of the coin. Such a piece could be worth a few dollars to Lincoln cent enthusiasts, particularly those who are concerned with varieties.

  62. Hi again, I have an old penny, possibly 1700s, its 1 1/4 wide with possibly George Washington on the front and seated liberty? On the back, any words or date have been worn off, it also has a stitch type pattern rolled into the edge, it appears to be either copper or bronze, any info would help, thanks.

    Reply
    • Hello, Kevin –

      It’s hard to say without seeing the piece if it is a coin or token or whether or not is even American. If you could please post a photo of it here in the comments forum that would be most helpful. Thanks!

      Reply
  63. Hey I have a 1877 trade dollar, I had it appraised at $10,000 the first time then the second guy said it was only worth about $10 it is in very good condition.

    Reply
    • Hi, Kman –

      The only reason I think you got those disparate remarks is because the first appraiser must have estimated the coin to be in Prof condition; the second must have believed it to be a replica. You could either get a third or fourth appraisal and/or consider getting your coin authenticated by a third-party coin grader. Here’s more info: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

      Reply
  64. The other day I found a 1968 D penny in a roll it seems to have some strange qualities however… On the obverse side the portrait of
    Lincoln is raised quite a bit more than usual, on the reverse side there
    is a very clear indentation exactly where the portrait of Lincoln is on
    the obverse side. I’m curious as to why this may be or if its been seen commonly before?

    Reply
    • Hi, Shannon,

      The relief on the Lincoln cents of the late 1960s was very high as compared to many other dates of Lincoln cent. This is usual and is simply a noted variation among the many dies used to strike Lincoln cents over the years.

      Reply
    • Hi, James –

      You mean the reverse is blank, no wheat ears or lettering at all? If that is the case, then your coin was altered in some way as that type of error would have been virtually impossible to have happened, given minting methods of the time.

      Reply
  65. Hello I have a 1917 wheat penny on the front side there is no Li in Liberty a black line that goes from the front and onto the back of the penny and the E-PLURIBUS-UNUM part of it looks in graved. Also on both sides of the penny the images look shadowed. I also have a 1944 that is different in color. what do you think the prices of the two pennies be and where can I sell them?

    Reply
  66. Hi I have a 1972 with what appears to be the “D” mint mark on Lincoln’s cheek. Just wondering if it’s worth more than a .. penny?

    Reply
  67. Hello, I found a wheat penny that is blank on the head side. Therefore no year is listed. It was with a collection of several other coins between 1914 and 1960…The blank side is completely smooth, no rim. The side with the wheat appears pretty clean.

    Reply
  68. Good evening Mr. Hernandez,
    I was looking through some pennies and have some unique items. Specifically this 1941 penny which seems to have a steel casing around the copper body. I used a magnet to test the casing and it is definitely metal, but the body appears to be copper as I tested the magnet on the body and no reaction.

    Would the mint have accidently put a steel casing on a copper penny or is this something after the mint?
    I was curious as it was unique with a few copies of steel 1943 pennies.
    Thanks.
    Michael

    Reply
    • Hi, Michael –

      It looks like your coin was formerly a component of some type of jewelry – probably a key chain or necklace. Unfortunately the ring would have caused some inadvertent damage to the coin, and it is worth a few cents, but is still a really neat piece to hang on to because of its age.

      Reply
  69. Hey Joshua,

    I have a 1966 Lincoln cent with the number “7” clearly struck on the coin’s edge. The size & font appear identical to the “7” found on the 1967 Lincoln cent and, if the coin is held obverse side up and thought to represent a watch face with the 1966 date at an approximate 4:00 position, the “7” appears inverted around the 5:00 position, again struck on the penny’s edge. Any guidance you could provide re: rarity & potential value would be most helpful. I appreciate your time and insight.
    Wes

    Reply
    • Hi, Wesley –

      While we will absolutely be glad to double check with use of a photo (which you can post here in the comments section), it sounds like your coin was counterstamped after it had left the mint. In that case, the coin was altered.

      Reply
  70. Hello! I was hoping you could help me…I have a near ms65 1917 wheat cent. The reverse is all but missing the first S in States and the bottom left leg of the R in America below that. Could you please help me with what I am dealing with here? Thanks so much!

    Reply
    • Hi, Bryan –

      At first I was inclined to say that you may have a weakly struck example of a 1917 Lincoln wheat cent, but what I want to see are two things: what type of grading company labeled that coin (if at all) and the nature of the surface metal around the “S” and “R.” If you could post a pic of the coin that would be most excellent. Thanks!

      Reply
  71. i have just found a 1942 WHEATBACK PENNY That has no mint Mark and the L in LIBERTY looks like it was to close to the rim and the mint altered the,” Font” of the L,,for it is not as thick a “font” and even the,” E”,in Liberty looks off-set from the rest of the letters,,like it just did not fit the coins and they adjusted it.

    Reply
    • Bryce,

      I have seen several Lincoln wheat cents where there appear to be slight variances in the distance between lettering and such. If you would like to submit a photo here to the comments forum so we can check for sure that would be fine. Otherwise, I believe you have a “normal” 1942 Lincoln wheat cent that is worth around 5 cents.

      Reply
  72. Hi, I have a 1965 with a D printed under the year date ,
    Wheat penny , need some help with authenticity . Any help will be appreciated .

    Reply
    • Hi, Andre –

      Would you mind posting a photo of this coin so I can further verify the nature of the coin and hopefully help verify its authenticity? Thank you!

      Reply
  73. I have three pennies with double hair lines on the forehead. I know it’s not a known variety, but I have THREE. Thinking about sending them in to PCGS, but worry about the cost of finding out it won’t be enough to create a variety. I can send pics…..

    Reply
      • Ok. Will do. Sent one off to pcgs to see what they say. Won’t know for three weeks or so. Tomorrow, if it doesn’t get nuts, ill post a couple pics. Thanks.

        Reply
  74. I have a 1972 D penny that has the Lincoln Memorial on the back with a partial Lincoln memorial a cross it. Is it worth anything or do you think it has been tampered with.

    Reply
  75. Hey there people,
    I have a 1953 D wheat penny that is magnetic, and I am not sure if it is on a different planchet, or if it is even worth anything. Any help woould be greatly appreciated, Thanks

    Reply
  76. i have a 1952 d penny. The side with Lincoln is the only side that has been pressed. The reverse side is totally blank. Could you estimate how much it is worth please?

    Reply
    • Hello,

      It sounds like your 1952-D Lincoln cent has been altered, as it is virtually impossible, due to modern striking processes, for a coin to be struck on just one side. The value of your coin may be a couple dollars to those interested in novelty coins. Thanks for your question!

      Reply
  77. I have A 1955 penny that has a slanted I in the word united .it looks like its almost connected to the N. Have you ever heard of this? Also I have a 45 penny that appears to have an extra leaf on the back..Thanks for any help

    Reply
    • Hello, Joe –

      May we see images of both coins to help make a determination on what you have? Thank you so much!

      Reply
  78. Hi,After sorting huge amount of Lincoln wheat cents,i found one like this.
    Is it error coin,the 9 in date is oddly filled but its not DDO

    Reply
    • If it’s a steel wheat penny yes. If it attaches to a magnet then it confirms it’s steel. They have been known to go for up to $100,000.00 depending on the grade and rarity.

      Reply
  79. I was wondering if you or anyone has ever heard of a 1943 steel penny that is off center, double struck on obverse and reverse? The coin has been graded and is real. Is it of any value?

    Reply
  80. I have a 1559 D wheat penny that looks like silver. It does have a scratch and it looks copper under the scratch. Any idea what this is? Thanks.

    Reply
    • Yes, Dale! Sounds like your 1959-D penny was coated with metal, most likely pewter or zinc. Coating coins is commonly done by people outside the mint and does not add any value to the coin. Thanks for your question!

      Reply
  81. I have a 1943 copper penny it passed the magnet test so i took it to a dealer and he ran a few tests on it. the coin passed all the tests except one the composition was copper. could this coin have been pressed on a copper planchet?

    Reply
    • Hi, Crystal –

      So, you mean, your 1943 penny does NOT stick to a magnet? Which one test did it not pass?

      It is possible your coin is a copper 1943 cent, but it would be important to determine if it has been altered from a 1948 Lincoln cent or a penny of another date.

      1943 copper pennies definitely exist, and it is possible you have one, but it’s important we check off all the authenticity boxes, as you are definitely working on right now.

      If you’re inclined, you could send your coin to a reputable third-party coin grader to get another professional opinion.

      Here’s some more info on that: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

      Good luck, and please ask if you have any more questions!

      Reply
    • Hi, Sheldon –

      Yes, your 1958-D Lincoln cent is worth more than 1 cent, but not by much… A typical, worn 1958-D cent has a value of around 5 cents.

      Reply
  82. I have a 1949 D penny, the one in the date is connected to the nine and slants at about a forty five degree angle, any ideas ?

    Reply
    • Hello Benny –

      This may be some type of die crack… would you mind posting a photo of your coin here in the comments section, please?

      Thank you!

      Reply
    • Hi, Raliek –

      A 1959 doubled die obverse cent is worth around $10 to $20, based on its condition.

      Reply
  83. Hi Joshua, I recently came across a 1953 d Lincoln Penny with an error. The back of the coin reads ” UNITED TATES OF AMERICA” No S. Is it worth anything? Thanks.

    Reply
    • Hello, Carlos,

      It is most likely that somebody removed that “S” to make the motto read something different, which is a common type of post-mint damage. If that is the case (though a photo may help me to determine otherwise), then your coin is worth face value.

      Thank you for your question!

      Reply
        • Hi, Carlos!

          It looks like there not only is a missing “S,” but also a very faint “E” in “AMERICA.” Something must have impeded the strike along a vertical orientation – perhaps it was grease in the die. In this case, your coin may have additional value, perhaps anywhere from $5 to $20 or more. I would take this to a coin dealer who specializes in United States coins and, if possible, one well-versed in errors.

          Reply
  84. Hi I have 2 pennies I am curious about here, 1 is a 1972 that looks like it was struck 2 times on the rim, now the 2nd is a wheat penny from 1946, the 6 is barely there the i is barely there and if you look at the T it almost looks like a capital I what do you think of these 2 coins? I appreciate your feedback!

    Reply
    • Hi, Guest!

      The 1972-D cent exhibits a common type of machine doubling, and the 1946 cent appears to have been weakly struck in the case of the missing “6” and the “I” in “LIBERTY,” but what I also see is what appears to be doubling in the tail of the “9.” The photo is just a tad blurry; if you wouldn’t mind trying to get a second shot, I’d be glad to take another look and try to confirm if the 1946 cent has any evident doubling (which may explain why the letters in the motto “IN GOD WE TRUST” look a little thicker than usual).

      Reply
  85. Hi I have 2 pennies I am curious about here, 1 is a 1972 that looks like it was struck 2 times on the rim, now the 2nd is a wheat penny from 1946, the 6 is barely there the i is barely there and if you look at the T it almost looks like a capital I what do you think of these 2 coins? I appreciate your feedback!

    Reply
    • Hello, Keri!

      Yes, it looks like the 1972-D was machine doubled, which is a rather common type of phenomenon. If you wouldn’t mind trying to get a slightly clearer picture of your 1946, I might be able to see if there is any doubling on that coin (it appears there may be some in the “9” of the date and in the motto IN GOD WE TRUST but I can’t tell for sure!)

      Reply
  86. i have a 1950 S wheat penny in a silver color, I heard this could be a rare error. If you can shed any light I would appreciate it!

    Reply
  87. The first 2 pics show the color, the last pic looks more coppery just because of my lighting, but it’s a nicer close up 🙂

    Reply
    • Hello, Annie –

      Back in that era, it was common for many people to coat their pennies with mercury or silver to replicate the appearance of the 1943 steel cent. To be sure, however, you could weigh the coin. If it comes in at around 3.11 grams or a tad more, it is a copper penny with a coating. If it weighs less than 3 grams or more than 3.3 or so, then it’s possible it was struck on the wrong planchet and could be worth more if authentic.

      I hope this answer helps! Ask follow-up questions any time you wish.

      Reply
      • Thanks for the response. Took it to my jeweler and they said it weighed over 3 ounces, but I should’ve gotten the exact weight! I thought if it was over 3 it was just a regular penny. I need to get an accurate scale 🙂 I will let you know if I find out anything cool.

        Reply
  88. hello, several years ago i found some wheat pennies in an old house, these pennies were shiney like new and on the wheat stalks each individual kernal had a fine hair coming out of it just like real wheat. do you know if this is how newly minted wheat pennies looked? thank you.

    Reply
    • Nice fine, Evalena! Yes, many brand-new looking Lincoln wheat cents are shiny orange and show immense detail in the wheat stalks.

      Reply
  89. Hello, I am not a collector but have a coin that needs to be graded. It is a 1961 D Lincoln Cent. The front is double struck with a Lincoln 1959 D face. The reverse has the 1961 column back also with a 1959 one cent wheat design. It is my understanding the 1959 D wheat penny is odd. Can you help with determining its worth? Thanks JT

    Reply
        • Hello JT,

          Thank you for sending me these images. From what I can tell, somebody hammered a wheat cent onto your 1961-D cent, imparting the double image. I can tell because the wheat design elements are incuse (struck into the coin) instead of raised as they should be on a double-struck coin.

          Moreover, such an error would have been virtually impossible at the mint, because Lincoln memorial and wheat dies were not used simultaneously. Even the possibility of an old, finished wheat cent getting fed into the coin press and being struck with a newer design would be ruled out since this coin has incuse wheat elements.

          When and exactly how this happened I cannot say, but I do know this is not a mint-made error given the incuse design.

          Thank you for your question!
          -Josh

          Reply
  90. Interesting. So, Someone struck a 1959 D on the front and then struck a seperate wheat cent on the back. I have it at ANACS and will let you know there conclusion also. Thank You!

    Reply
    • Hi JT,

      Yes, we’d be interested in finding out what ANACS says about that piece. Thanks for letting us know!

      Reply
  91. I have found a 1969 S penny that is smaller than normal pennies. Is it counterfeit? It looks authentic apart from the smaller size. Looks like it was minted without an edge.

    Reply
    • Hi, Sarah – Would you mind submitting a photo of your coin if possible so I can see if it is a damaged coin or one that was struck on the wrong-sized coin blank? Thank you!

      Reply
    • Hi Reyna,

      It’s very possible there was an issue with the die that obscured or weakened the appearance of the “1.” If you wouldn’t mind posting an image of your 1977 cent I may be able to make a better determination and provide some idea as to the coin’s value.

      Thank you!

      Reply
      • Hello Reyna,

        It looks like a filled die may have caused the weakness in the “1.” This wouldn’t necessarily mean it’s worth much more, but it is an interesting piece nevertheless and is a prim example of what can happen when grease gets into the dies that stamp the coins.

        Thanks for posting those great pics!

        Reply
  92. These are pictures of a Lincoln wheat penny 1956 D. It is among many rolls I found buried under
    our kitchen floor (while recently remodeling) of the old home we bought 13 years ago .I was looking for a faint lines of a secondary D below the mint mark and I noticed that the 6 was really weird looking…it kind of overlaps onto its stem Also, the wheat side is rotated about 10-15% off in its proper alignment. Is it counterfeit? Or just a crazy mixed up Abe?

    Reply
    • Hi Annie,

      Firstly, how neat is that to find all those rolls of coins under the floor of your kitchen! Some amazing finds are made when people remodel older homes. As for your 1956-D cent, it looks to me like it may have been a die chip that caused that blobby raised metal on the “6” at the meeting of the stem and loop. This is a common problem with 1950s Lincoln cents, and doesn’t normally translate to a higher value, though it still is a nice piece to hang onto as a curiosity.

      Thanks for the great photo, and keep on searching! Maybe you’ll find more numismatic treasures inside your home.

      Reply
  93. Thanks, Josh, for your quick response…it is fun…I am getting hooked. Would that die problem explain why the front (oops obverse) line up with the wheat side? It is rotated 10% and if I keep the wheat side level and turn it evenly, Abe is leaning forward quite a bit. Thanks so much again. Annie

    Reply
    • Hi, Annie –

      So glad you’re getting hooked! That’s what we’re here for! The issue you’re talking about, where Lincoln is leaning forward when you turn the reverse right side up, is called a die rotation error. Especially on older coins, the die rotation would not always be exactly 180 degrees, causing both sides to be slightly off. Unless the die alignment is off be about 20 degrees or more, there is no added value, per se, to a coin where the obverse and reverse aren’t quite lined up properly.

      Thanks for your question! If you have any more, please check back at any time.

      Reply
  94. I recently came across a 1958D wheat penny silver in color and I need to know if It is rare or valuable,it also has a flaw at bottom on the back of coin.

    Reply
  95. I am going through my grandparents coin collection that I recently received. I am looking at a 1957 wheat penny with a S mint mark. I cannot find it any book I purchased. It is marked ODD 1957 S in my grandfathers handwriting. I checked it under a 10X loop and it is clear. Has anyone ever heard of this error?

    Reply
    • Hello, Tammy –

      There’s no record of any such coin as a 1957-S penny. I would need to see a picture of the coin to confirm what’s going on, and it may really be an “S” on the coin, but it’s possible that somebody soldered on the “S” mintmark from a San Francisco penny to create a type of fantasy novelty coin.

      That’s my theory without seeing the coin, anyway!

      I hope this helps. If you would like to post a photo, please feel free to do so here in the comments section.

      Reply
  96. The coinis in a plastic/cardboard holder so I hope it’s clear. I do have an upcoming appointment with a dealer, so I’m trying to decide what to take and what to leave home.

    Reply
    • Hello,

      Given the date of the coin and the tilt and location of the mintmark, I’d suggest this coin may have been altered, actually.

      The pic is a little fuzzy, but I’m making this out to be a “1958” penny, yet no San Francisco cents were made from 1956 through 1967.

      Reply
  97. Hi. I bought an “unsearched” lot of steel pennies years ago. I went through them and picked out a couple of oddball ones, and was wondering about a few. I do not have pictures as I am at work and found your article, but I think the most peculiar one I have is a steel cent with no reverse. I have yet to see anything online about it so I don’t know if it’s rare or just too common to be special.

    Reply
    • Hi, David —

      That sounds interesting. While I don’t want to say for certain without seeing a photo (it would be unfair to you for me to make a judgement call on a coin I haven’t seen), I can say that a very large number of coins from that era without an obverse or reverse were often mutilated for jewelry and also to serve as magicians’ “trick” coins.

      If you can get a photo up here in the comments section at some point, I’d be glad to check it out and make sure.

      Thanks for checking us out!

      Reply
  98. Found 1984 Lincoln penny no copper coating at all either side concerns are it only weighs 2 grams no mint mark non magnetic under extreme magnify there is what looks like silver spots. Could this been struck on a dime blank reg. penny 24mm. one in question is 26mm.both 2 mm thick

    Reply
  99. Hi I have a 1945 D pfenning 50 coin and I can not find it anywhere can some one help me to tell me why ,it is a nazi coin

    Reply
  100. I found a 1941 penny that has an extra 1 in the front of 1941 so it looks like 11941. I looked at it under a microscope, and it is the same as the first one. It may be a tad bit thicker, but has anyone seen a penny like that? I have to try to take a better picture of it so that I can show it on here. Any help would be appreciated.

    Reply
    • Hello, Steve –

      From the photo you provided I can see the “extra 1” you mention but I think I may need a close-up of that area on the coin, if possible, to make a determination, please.

      Thanks for submitting the photo!

      Reply
    • Hello, Nataly —

      What a neat gift your dad gave you! While your 1944 Lincoln wheat cent is worth around 5 to 10 cents right now, you’ll still want to hang onto it anyway. Years from now, you’ll be glad to have that neat old coin that your dad gave you!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  101. what’s going on with my coin on the bottom it seems to have an extra wheat stock that’s inverted and the other two wheat stalks on the bottom are connected

    Reply
    • Hello, Dustin —

      Based on the photo, it appears to be a die break of some sort. These types of pieces do garner some collector interest and can be worth between $1 ad $3, though often more based on the popularity of the variety.

      Nice find!

      Reply
  102. I have a 1941 wheat penny, thickness of razor blade, weight 1.7g, made on foreign coin planchet. Could u tell me worth please

    Reply
  103. hello just want to see if some one can give me some info on this penny.
    i have many 1961 d penny, but the 1 on the 1961 looks really odd.
    just curious. Thank you

    Reply
  104. I have a 1936 D wheat penny with an odd error, as far as I know I am the only one who has this error, take at look at the Y in liberty, and give me your feedback as to what you think may have caused this.

    Reply
    • Hello, Harry —

      For some reason the image isn’t opening. Would you please report that photo if possible?

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
  105. can, some one help, i have 1938 Roosevelt dime, how much can is sell it for ? I know this is a mint error, maybe is a 1988….

    Reply
    • Hello,

      Whereas no Roosevelt dimes were made until 1946, this sounds like it may be a 1988. What type of error does the coin seem to have?

      Thanks for your question!

      Reply
    • It looks like the coin has received some extensive damage on the “LIBERTY” part of the coin, explaining the appearance. While the coin is worth roughly 3 cents, it’s an obsolete wheat type and still worth hanging onto. Thanks for checking!

      Reply
  106. I have a 1993 penny that is larger than normal in size and it sounds different if you drop it.. Do you know anything about it?

    Reply
    • Hello, Angel —

      You’re likely describing a replica, of which I know of many, but I can’t say for sure without seeing an image of your coin in scale with a regular-sized penny. If you could provide a photo of your coin, please, that would be most helpful.

      Thank you for your question,
      Josh

      Reply
  107. This was in my mother’s coin collection when she passed away. I didn’t know she was that serious about her collection, but this penny is in a old, yellowed cardboard holder that says, “Broken Die/1919S/$1.00.”

    Reply
    • Hello, Alan —

      We’re very sorry to hear about your mother’s passing…

      As for this interesting coin, I’d be curious about its surfaces before making an evaluation. It would appear to me in the image that any die breakage may be on the obverse over Lincoln’s eye, but I can’t say for certain based on the image alone. The weakness of the surfaces is making it fairly difficult for me to say for certain the size and magnitude from the photo alone.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • I’ll do a better scan today. I had “sharpness” turned on, and I think it distorted some of the detail. Thanks, and I’ll post it later on today…

        Reply
      • Here’s a better scan…my scanner can see better than I can! It looks like the coin is just in very bad condition. And that die defect is definitely over Lincoln’s eye.

        Reply
        • Hello, Alan —

          Yes, it appears the coin is substantially worn and may have even been struck weakly to begin with. As I take a better look at the obverse surface, I notice a chain of what looks like post-mint gouges in front of Lincoln’s nose and wonder if the defect over Lincoln’s eye might actually have been damage created from whatever straight-line damage caused the gouges in front of Lincoln’s nose.

          -Josh

          Reply
  108. I found this coin on craigslist and wonder if this error has much value there is a space between the s and the t

    Reply
    • Hi, “Java” —

      I’ve seen Lincoln cents of various years with spacing issues like this between the letters. As far as I’ve always known, there isn’t any particular value difference for these types of minor design variances in most cases unless the coin in question is collected specifically for that said design variety, which does introduce a supply-demand issue.

      Reply
  109. hello, I just found some very old coins in my grandmothers closet and there was a 1944 steel penny among about 35 other steel pennies. I tried weighing it but couldnt get my scale to calibrate correctly. I tried the magnet test and it was picked up very easily by the magnet. Could this coin possibly be real????

    Reply
    • Hi, Tom —

      It’s possible, but because there are so many counterfeits out there it would take much more than a magnet test to verify the authenticity of your coin. It would be important to determine the weight of that coin to come closer to a conclusion. What I suggest, if you’re willing, is to see if a coin authentication firm could give it a look. These services can cost anywhere from about $20 to $30 (which would be a bummer if your coin wasn’t the real McCoy), but are very reputable.

      Here’s some more info for you about this: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

      Best of luck!
      Josh

      Reply
  110. Ok, I can see this being a post mint damage. If you could take a closer look at it for me, because whatever this is on the outside if placed on it by a separate party than the mint it sure does not in any way move like it was put there. I’ve tried to dislodge the two and not the slightest budge. If you have the same conclusion as before I appreciate you taking another look and mean not to offend if you feel I’m second guessing you.

    Reply
  111. that has a error on the back where it says eat pluribus unum its spelled you and you instead of you and us you know me in the back pranking you and you instead of new and um 1945 penny wheat pennies

    Reply
  112. I found this 1917 penny back on July 1, 2007. Robert Mitchum, my favorite actor died on July 1, 1997. He was born on Aug 6, 1917. Thought I would share this with you. I am not a collector but is this penny worth anything other that something more sentimental to me because of Robert Mitchum?

    Reply
    • Hi, Skatoula —

      What an interesting coincidence regarding your coin. While the matter regarding Robert Mitchum would not monetarily effect your coin in the marketplace, I can tell you that the standard value of a well-worn 1917 Lincoln cent is about 15 to 20 cents.

      Nice find!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi,

      While I would need to see the texture of the blank side to be sure, it looks like the coin was altered post mint, especially as the obverse (head’s side) looks not only normal but well struck.

      Thanks for your question,
      -Josh

      Reply
  113. I have a 59 wheat penny. It has D mark and the back is not like my other wheat pennies. What can I sell it for? And where would I sell it.

    Reply
    • Hi, Rachel —

      I would love to see a photo of this coin please to identify it. There have been some rare sightings of such a piece, but in most cases they have turned up to be counterfeit. If this is the real deal, it’s best to have it certified by a third-party coin grading company to authenticate it.

      Here’s some more info on that: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Im sorry it has taken a while to get back to u ….but yes ill send you a pic. When I get home tomorrow night …. also I will send a pic of a buffalo nickel I have the back side has an error I think….it has a print of the Indian face printed on top of buffalo head…. it is 1918 D, but im not sure about the mint being a D im just guessing coz it has a D on the cheek of the Indian on the front.
        Thank you and ill get them pics to u soon as I get home tomorrow night again sorry its been a while had family matters to deal with … thanks….

        Rachel Williamson

        Reply
  114. I unrolled some pennies at work and it caught my eye immediately. A blank penny. Both side blank. No scratches, nothing. Pretty cool so I kept it. Is it anything special?

    Reply
  115. I have a 1974 D penny…..it looks odd to me, part of the vest is gone under the date, looks like he doesn’t have a neck, nose doesn’t seem connected to his face…..what do u think????

    Reply
    • Hi, Marquise —

      Good eye! This piece is fairly typical of a weakly struck Lincoln cent and is worth hanging onto, if nothing else, for its copper bullion.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  116. Hello, I have this 1914 Lincoln Wheat Cent that looks to be a double die. I’ve searched for similar pennies all over the web and coin sites with no luck. Tell me what you think Joshua. Thanks MW

    Reply
  117. I have a 1944 wheat cent and it was stamped opposite on the sides. To explain when looking at lincon upright you flip the penny and the other side is upside down

    Reply
  118. I have a 1969 s penny and the heads appears to me to be bigger then on a regular 1969 and also it looks like there is a number 6 on the bottom and f his cheek …. Also I have a 1969 d that has a missing L in liberty and the I in “in god we trust” are these worth anything..

    Reply
    • Hi, Kristina —

      Photos in this case would definitely help in this case, as I want to see exactly what these details looks like, please. It sounds like the 1969-D missing some of the lettering is basically normal for a coin of this date, especially if it has seen a lot of wear.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Barbara —

      Since there are several types of errors that could occur with a 1962-D penny, would you mind providing me with a photo of the coin here in the forums section?

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Dustin —

      If you found the 1958 cent in pocket change, then it must have some degree of wear. Should this be the case, your piece would be worth 3 to 5 cents.

      Thank you for your question,
      Josh

      Reply
  119. I Have a 1942 S Wheat Back Lincoln Cent that has a crack running from Lincoln’s skull under “We” to the edge under “Trust” . It almost looks like the outer layer of metal is separating from the underside. Is that even possible? I will try to attach a photo. Is there added value in a coin like this?

    Reply
    • Hi, Jay —

      It looks like something had substantially damaged the coin after it left the U.S. Mint. I can tell due to the way the other surface elements/devices are malformed in those areas. These old coins really can tell some stories — sometimes the stories could be categorically thrilling.

      Cheers,
      Josh

      Reply
  120. I have found a 1944 wheat penny with no mint mark that’s in excellent condition and was wondering how much it could be worth

    Reply
    • Hi, Garry —

      This sounds like one of the many 1970s and early 1980s Lincoln cents that were resold by a private company at about that time with counterstamps of each U.S. state. It sounds like you must have an Iowa piece, given the description. These are fairly collectible and tend to be wort 25 to 50 cents to collectors.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  121. Hi joshua i have. A question i have a 1953s wheat penny,on the reverse side the UNNTED STATES appears as i spelled it but the T seems to be inccorperated into the second N.is this coin worth getting appraissed?

    Reply
  122. Hi, Armando —

    Photos are always most helpful in this case, so if you wouldn’t mind posting one of your 1953-S Lincoln wheat cent I’d be glad to check it out and give you my opinion.

    Best,
    Josh

    Reply
    • Hi, Anahi —

      Thank you for providing me with an estimate on the weight. This tells me the coin is a copper-based cent that has either been plated or chemically altered to give it a silvery appearance.

      In either case, the coin would be worth face value.

      Happy New Year!
      Josh

      Reply
  123. Hello! I have a 1958 D wheat penny that has abnormal spacing between the “O” and “D” “In God We Trust”. Is this something collector’s look for or is it something that makes it valuable?

    Reply
    • Hi, Stacey —

      It depends how far apart the lettering is in terms of rather or not your piece is some type of scarce anomaly. I can tell you off the bat that there are minor variances in letter spacing during that era, which are common.

      If you wouldn’t mind sharing a photo of your 1958-D Lincoln wheat cent, I’d be glad to take a look and provide more info on your specific piece.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Robert —

      I’ve got two plausible theories on this coin. Either:

      A) Centrifugal force (possibly caused by the coin spinning in a laundry drier) caused the edge to compress inward, forcing the rim up.

      B) The edge is actually a jeweler’s collar of some sort, used to incorporate the coin in jewelry’ the coin’s silvery color suggests is may have also been plated, perhaps in pewter.

      In-hand examination would allow me to determine either A or B, or, of course, a possible alternative “c.” Though, from the photos, I’m pretty confident that one of the above scenarios explains what happened to your coin.

      In either case, the coin would be worth 2 to 3 cents.

      I hope this helps answer some questions for you!
      Josh

      Reply
  124. Hello Josh I have a 1942 s wheat penny that the metal is two colors. It looks like it was wiped in a dark gray over the copper. I’ve looked everywhere on line and there’s no mention of a metal error. Can you help me? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hi, Heather —

      Your description of the dark gray streaking makes me believe that your coin is a regular copper piece that has undergone some irregular toning. This is actually a common issue with many older copper coins, and while not rare or warranting of any increase in value, it’s nonetheless an eye-catching anomaly.

      Such a 1942-S Lincoln wheat cent is worth 5 to 10 cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  125. Hi I have a quick question. My 1954 Denver minted wheat penny has an error. If I take it into my hand with the Lincoln side right side up and I flip it horizontally it is on the wrong side!!! Is this possible? If so how much is this worth?
    – Dom

    Reply
    • Hi, Dominic —

      Just to make sure I understand correctly, both Lincoln on the obverse and the wheat stalks on the reverse are facing up simultaneously? They should be oriented 180 degrees of each other, so while Lincoln is right-side up, the wheat stalks are upside down. If both sides are facing up at the same time, it’s an unlikely error that is often counterfeited through alteration and would need to be examined in-hand to assure its authenticity.

      I hope this answers some questions!
      Josh

      Reply
    • It’s my pleasure, Dominic! Thank you so much for reading our articles and asking questions. I absolutely love helping people!

      Reply
  126. Josh, I have a 1945 D penny, mistruck 9. I’ve looked online, but the price seems all over the place. Can you give me a more accurate worth of this coin. In good condition. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hi, Joshua —

      I’m not sure exactly how the “9” was mis-struck without seeing a photo of your specific piece; I can tell you that the ordinary value of a 1945 Lincoln wheat cent with a typical amount of wear for its age is 3 to 5 cents.

      If you want to upload a photo of your coin so I can take a look at the “9,” please feel free to do so!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Sadly, I’m not exactly sure how to post a picture here from my phone. To describe it, basically the round portion of the 9 looks like a small 0 and the leg coming up is actually offset to the right, not connected to the small 0. Hopefully I can figure out how to load a picture soon if this doesn’t give you an idea. Thank you for your time.

        Reply
  127. Hello, I have a 1957 d penny only a 1/4 of it was stamped(90% o.c.) The rest of the penny is bare. Is this penny worth anything?

    Reply
    • Hi, Francisco —

      If your coin is both off-center AND the date is still visible (as I infer it is), it could be worth $150 or more, but I’d want to see those “slices” on your coin to see if it’s post-mint damage.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  128. I have a 1943 steel penny. It is missing the 4 in the date. Or rather the 4 is so faint you can barely see it. It also has a square where the mint designation should be. Should I be excited that I have a rare coin or is this a ‘meh’ coin; interesting but with no real money value?

    Reply
    • Hi, Enedina –

      I’d neither consider it a rare coin nor a “meh” coin. Without seeing a photo I can’t say for certain, but it sounds like other weakly struck or was struck by a grease-filled die. In either case, the coin might be worth $1 to $2. It could, however (outside chance) be another type of error; I would be glad to provide further details if you would like to post a photo.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Levi —

      Actually it appears to be a pit on the coin itself, possibly due to a strike-through error (though I can’t tell because the photo gets blurry up close). If this is indeed a strike-through error, it would be worth $1 to $3.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Nora —

      Yes, they’re all worth more than face value:

      1935 Lincoln cent — 10 cents
      1951-D Lincoln cent — 5-8 cents
      1956-D Lincoln cent — 3-5 cents

      Nice finds!
      Josh

      Reply
  129. Hi Josh, I have a 1990 penny with ALOT of cud all over it. Here’s pics. There is cud in front of lincolns nose and forhead, by the L and I in LIBERTY, by the T in Trust and the back also has cud on the left corner of the Linciln Memorial, also in the second column , by the OF and a little down from the A in AMERICA. I also have a 1941 wheat penny with a large die crack. Some of the crack is raised and some is an open die crack, what is a estimated value for these coins please? Thank you for your time Josh! Sorry the wheat penny is the middle pic and the first and last is the 1990 penny. Thank you!

    Reply
  130. Hi Josh. I have a 1988 lincoln penny that is double died on the obverse of the coin. ONE CENT is DD, the Lincoln Memorial is DD, and most of UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is DD! Yes, it is an honest true DD. It is not Die deteriation. It is actually a very clear DD but cannot get it in a picture close enough. Sorry. I will try to find a way to get a close up pic to show you. I am very excited about this coin. What would the value be around? The coin itself is in very good condition. Thank you Josh!

    Reply
    • Hi, Jennifer —

      The fact that you can see the date on your piece tells me it’s worth a little more than a similar piece on which the date isn’t visible. Yours, assuming the fraction off-center is indeed about 60 to 70 percent, is worth around $5.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  131. Dayum! I remember, when I was a kid, my father had these blue, fold-out coin holders with a slot for every date and mintmark so you could slip the corresponding coins in their slots.
    When he was out to sea, I found them in his closet and looked at them. Not much really jumped out at me except for one of the penny books that had every slot filled. If I remember correctly, each book was dedicated to each decade. The one I am thinking of was the book for the 1940’s.
    I’m sure most of you know exactly what that means.
    By the time he returned from overseas, my brother and I had scattered and lost most of the coins he had collected.

    Reply
  132. Hello there, can I get some information about the middle nickel and penny? The nickel is dated 1999 and the edge of the coin cuts off about half of the writing on the coin. The cent is dated 1969 and it has a Kennedy head stamped on it. Thank you.

    Reply
  133. Hi Joshua! I found a 1960 penny that has no stamp at all on the back of it. Its just a smooth flat surface. My husband said it could be rare.

    Reply
    • Hi, Judy —

      A blank reverse? It sounds like it MAY be a magician’s coin, used in conjunction with a dime that fits inside the reverse side of the coin. Though I’m not sure if by a blank, flat surface you mean hollowed out for sanded away. Would you mind posting a photo if possible, please?

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
  134. I’ve been trying to find out what the deal is with my 1934 Wheatback with a 2 and a 2 on either side of Lincoln, anyone know?

    Reply
    • neat! I’ve found some with weird stamps in them, too. Not sure what the 2 2 stands for…have you posted anything on coin forums? they LOVE to see personal coins. they might know.

      Reply
    • Hi, Chanlander —

      This coin was definitely stamped with those 2s outside of the U.S. Mint, but why is anyone’s guess. It is likely that this coin was used as some type of token or perhaps even incorporated into a piece of jewelry. The quality of the “2” counterstamps suggests that several other coins might bear the same types of numerals, perhaps all altered in one batch.

      Actually, this coin may be worth more as a novelty piece than as a numismatically collectible 1934 Lincoln cent. Sometimes, pieces like this are worth $1 to $2 or more, especially if the origin of the counterstamp can be ascertained.

      Thank you for posting,
      Josh

      Reply
  135. Hi, Judy —

    Thank you for the great photos. The deep striations and gouges on the reverse of the coin indicate the design was sanded down. Given the deep color of the coin, it looks as if this post-mint damage occurred quite some time ago. Unfortunately, this coin has no numismatic value.

    I do appreciate your taking time to upload images of this eye-popping coin!

    best,
    Josh

    Reply
    • Thank you for the info!
      I have lots of coins I have found and kept over the years and this one was unusual. I have a 1897 penny I found 44 years ago. Thank you again!

      Reply
      • Hi, Judy!

        You’re most welcome! That 1897 Indian Head cent, by the way, is worth $2 to $5 in circulated condition.

        Best,
        Josh

        Reply
  136. I have A 1958 Wheat Penny, and I Have No Idea What To Look For To Know If Its One Of The “Rare” Ones That Were Printed.

    Reply
  137. ok so i have a 1950 d wheatback penny with error, the collar extends on the right side of lincoln almot touches the # 1
    , worth anything.

    Reply
    • Hi, Christine —

      While the description is helpful (and it does sound like a possible, mint-made error based on what you just told me), I’d have to see a photo of the coin please to give you the most thorough explanation on the error and its possible value.

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
      • well if i knew how to send a picture, i would , i have it on a i phone just dont know .if you do let me know, thanks

        Reply
        • No worries, Christine!

          If you want to upload a photo from your phone, click on the little rectangular icon under the comment field and you sould be able to upload a photo from your phone’s image files/photo library.

          I hope this helps! 🙂
          Josh

          Reply
  138. Hi, Jeanette —

    Great questions! I’m glad you’re interested in learning more about coins and how to properly handle them.

    First things first, the general rule of thumb with coin collecting is not to clean coins. Cleaning a coin virtually always automatically cuts its value by at least 25 percent, and often 50 percent. Unfortunately, American Silver Eagles (the coin you have) are notorious for developing what collectors call milk spots. These are caused by a chemical reaction from a wash used at the Mint and cannot really be removed from a coin — they are embedded in the metal due to the chemical reaction.

    Here’s some more info on cleaning coins: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/cleaning_coins/

    The case used for holding this coin should be sufficient for long-term storage. Any handling or wear suffered by the coin will diminish its value, so the less you directly touch the coin, the better both from the appearance standpoint and value.

    It sounds like you have some varied and great collecting interests, and I hope you keep at it with the coins! If you have any other questions about coin collecting, please feel free to share them here and I’ll assist however I can!

    Best,
    Josh

    Reply
    • Hi, Christine —

      I don’t believe I see them anywhere. I apologize for the inconvenience, but if you don’t mind reposting that would be appreciated!

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Willie —

      Your 1903 Barber dime, assuming it is in well-worn condition, is worth about $4. The 1943 steel cents, if worn, are worth 10 to 50 cents each, based on their individual conditions.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  139. What would a Lincoln 1959 S with a wheat penny reverse be worth? It’s not in the best condition, but it is a very rather strange coin.

    Reply
    • Hi,

      Would you mind uploading an image of the 1958-D Lincoln cent with the blank reverse please?

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Thank you for the photos. It appears this coin was planed down; it is worth only its copper value, or about 2 cents.

      Beat,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Christine —

      I’ll need to please see a photo of this coin to see how off-center the design is and to help provide an opinion on its possible value.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Christine —

      There isn’t a noted “Close AM” variety for the 1969-S Lincoln cent, so I’ll need to please see a photo of this piece to see what anomaly there might be with your coin.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, FB —

      I’ll need to please see a photo of these coins so I can see what pieces they are and how far off-center they are to provide an opinion on their possible value.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Colleen —

      It appears both coins have post-mint damage. In the case of the 1944 cent, I believe I see a divot of some sort right around the mintmark, which in this case is looks like a well-worn “D.”

      In the case of the 1951 Lincoln cent, I think the top of the “5” has been sheared.

      Both coins are worth around 3 cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Dawn —

      Your 1944 cent was altered, and its reverse was shaven off. It’s worth only its copper value, or approximately 2 cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Elaine —

      It is a partial mintmark! Though, the more I look at the coin in general, the missing area of the mintmark appears consistent with the corrosion I see elsewhere on the coin, so I don’t believe it is an error, but rather post-mint damage. Your coin is still worth two cents for its metal content.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  140. Hi, I have a penny that is flattened and the size of a nickel. Any idea on whether done purposely or mistakenly when minted?

    Reply
    • Hi, Heather —

      Your Lincoln cent was intentionally flattened outside of the U.S. Mint and appears to have been counterstamped, also. The stamp is what flattened the penny to the wider size it is now. Generally speaking, altered pieces like this are worth between 10 cents and a dollar unless the origin of the counterstamp can be positively identified and helps attribute as a rare or unusual piece.

      Thank you for your question and coin photos!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Paul —

      It may be an error/variety or post-mint damage, based on what a photo of the coin tells me. I’d be looking for signs of scratches, gouges, or other surface interruptions to check and see if the date was removed after the coin left the mint.

      Please upload here a photo of the 1952 Lincoln cent if you could kindly do so!

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
  141. I have a 1949 penny I believe as I can barely make out the date. Do you have any info on the coin as to how much it’s worth?

    Reply
  142. I have a 1919 penny and it has no minting mark, but i think it has an error on the front. The “AM” in “AMERICA” are barely visible. Any idea how much its worth?

    Reply
    • Hello, Gabriela —

      What a neat find! The AM are missing due to die weakness and wear, and this this isn’t an abnormal piece, per se — but it’s an old coin with a story to tell for sure.

      Yours 1919 Lincoln cent, made in Philadelphia (no mintmark), is worth 10 to 15 cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi my name is Natasha you talk. About the 1944 wheat penny is it only the s mint mark worth money I also have a lot of other coins I thi K not to sure are worth more then face value

      Reply
    • Hi, Michael —

      Would you please submit a photo of the coin so I can see why the 4 may be missing?

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply