A 1975 Roosevelt Dime Worth $350,000? Here’s How To Tell If You Have One Of These Rare Dimes

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Did you know there’s a rare 1975 Roosevelt dime worth $350,000 500,000? (See update below.)

It’s true, and it’s probably the most valuable copper-nickel clad United States coin ever made.

But why is an old Roosevelt dime worth so much, and how can you find it?

I’m going to tell you:

  • What makes this rare 1975 Roosevelt dime so special.
  • How you might find one of these rare dimes.
  • What you can do to find other old dimes like it.

A 1975 Roosevelt Dime Really Sold For $350,000?

Yes! A 1975 Roosevelt dime took nearly $350,000 at auction. The 1975 No-S Roosevelt dime sold for $349,600 in summer 2011.

UPDATE: On September 6, 2019 this same 1975 Roosevelt dime sold for $456,000 at auction. Then, less than 1 week later, it traded hands in a private transaction to a wealthy Roosevelt dime collector for $516,000. This means it increased in value by more than $165,000 in fewer than 10 years!

Amazing, huh?

So why is this Roosevelt dime so rare?

Because only 2 of these special collector coins are known to exist!

They were made accidentally, and it’s thought that very few escaped before a United States Mint employee noticed the error and stopped the presses.

Apparently, at least a couple of these dimes (and maybe more!) escaped from the Mint before anyone could do something about them.

What To Look For On A 1975 Dime

This rare, some would say elusive 1975 Roosevelt dime does NOT contain an “S” mintmark.

But here’s the kicker — if you found a no-S 1975 Roosevelt dime in your pocket change, there’s a 99.9% chance it isn’t the rare dime that’s the subject of this post.


Does your 1975 Roosevelt dime look something like the one in this photo?

If so, unfortunately it’s NOT the 1975 N0-S Roosevelt dime. It’s a regular, Philadelphia Mint 1975 Roosevelt dime.

You see, all Roosevelt dimes made at the Philadelphia Mint prior to 1980 have no “P” mintmark. This is totally normal.

It’s understandable that you probably find this to be very disappointing news, but the only way you’re likely to turn up a 1975 No-S Roosevelt dime is by finding it in a 1975 proof set.

What Is A Proof Set?

A proof set is a special set of collector coins that the United States Mint sells to coin collectors each year.

Proof coins are made on specially prepared dies and are struck on polished planchets (coin blanks). Each proof coin is struck multiple times to help bring up minute details.

Most proof coins look very sharply struck and many have shiny, even mirror-like surfaces.

Proof coins have been made in the United States since the 1800s. During that time and into the 1900s, most proof coins were sold individually. Since 1936, proof coins have usually been offered in sets.

Traditionally, proof sets were packaged at the Philadelphia Mint — but since 1968, they’ve been manufactured at the San Francisco Mint.

As you may know by now, most coins that come from the San Francisco Mint have an “S” mintmark.

Virtually all proof 1975 Roosevelt dimes have an “S” mintmark.

In fact, of the 2,845,450 proof Roosevelt dimes made at the San Francisco Mint in 1975, only 2 of these are known not to have an “S” mintmark — it’s one of the rarest modern US coins!

Other Proof No-S Roosevelt Dimes

The 1975 No-S proof Roosevelt dime might be among the rarest of modern dimes, but it’s certainly not the only no-S Roosevelt dime.

Check out these other No-S proof Roosevelt dimes:

  • 1968 No-S Roosevelt dime — $10,500+
  • 1970 No-S Roosevelt dime — $450+
  • 1983 No -S Roosevelt dime — $400

Other Rare Roosevelt Dimes To Look For

Don’t lose hope of finding a rare Roosevelt dime!

Granted, that 1975 Roosevelt dime you just found is most likely not worth hundreds of thousands of dollars — but there are plenty of other old Roosevelt dimes worth much more than face value.

Check out these valuable, rare Roosevelt dimes you might find in pocket change:

  • Any pre-1965 silver Roosevelt dime — worth $1.50+
  • 1982 no-P Roosevelt dime — $75+
  • 1996-W Roosevelt dime — $15+

More Info On Rare Dimes

In addition to the links I’ve included above, here are some other resources to help you learn more about your old dimes:

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49 thoughts on “A 1975 Roosevelt Dime Worth $350,000? Here’s How To Tell If You Have One Of These Rare Dimes”

  1. Hello, I have a 1971 mint set. with 2 pennies, 1 Kennedy .50, 1 Jefferson nickle, 1 quarter.
    They’re S mint. Except only one penny has an S on it. The rest have no mint marks. Could this possibly
    Be like the 1975 no S dime proof?

    Reply
    • Hi, Robin —

      Your 1971 mint set contains coins from the Philadelphia (no mintmark), Denver, and San Francisco mints. While three mints are represented in this set, it contains only two cellophane envelopes. To accomplish this, Mint officials included the S-mint cent in the same package as the Philadelphia coins. This is normal, and your 1971 mint set is worth about $3 in total. I personally love mint sets — they’re great for collectors who want nice, uncirculated examples of our nation’s modern coins.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Hi, Joshua.
        Hey thanks for taking the time to get me an answer! Wow! I’m impressed.
        Not used to getting such a quick response! I love this sight already!
        I’ll certainly recommend it to others! Thanks again.
        Best wishes to you too!
        Robin

        Reply
  2. I really love this website its easy to understand what is mentioned in each page and the subjects are broken down so easily that I never have an issue. With that being said iv’e got a 1941 wheat penny that is incredibly shiny on the obverse side but normal on the other…ive never seen anything THAT shiny before

    Reply
    • Hi, Keenan —

      The U.S. Mint struck coins for the Philippines through the 1940s. A 1937 Philippines one-cent coin is worth about $1.50 to $2 in circulation condition.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Brenda —

      It appears to be struck off-center. Technically, it is an error dime, though I’m not sure the amount by which it was struck off center is enough to really register any significant numismatic value. I’d still keep the coin if I were you.

      Cool find!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Carrie —

      Hmm… I’m not an authority who can officially attribute doubled dies, but this MAY be one… I suggest sending this photo to variety expert John Wexler (here’s his info): https://doubleddie.com

      He can give you the official info on whether it’s a doubled die and, as the lead author of several variety books in the industry, attribute it as such if it is.

      Best wishes!
      Josh

      Reply
  3. Hi Josue! Como puedo saber la diferencia y saber de qué casa es cada una,si tengo varios dimes de 1975 sin marca de ceca,como saber cuál es “D”cuál es “P”y cuál es “S”?….si mi pregunta párese tonta,no importa,quiero salir de mi ignorancia,..y muchas gracias de antemano por tu información de verdad lo aprecio.

    Reply
    • Hi, Wally —

      This is a 1975 business-strike Roosevelt dime from the Philadelphia Mint, which at the time did not place mintmarks on its coins. This piece appears worn and is therefore worth its face value.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
  4. I have two 1970 a65 75 and a 76 dime and I Don’t know what to do with them to see if they are value of anything

    Reply
    • Hi, Mary —

      I don’t see the coins you’re referring to, but if you found them in circulation they’re all but certain to be Philadelphia-minted business strikes which ordinarily do NOT have a “P” mintmark. If these are worn, they’re worth face value.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Livelyb23,

      I’m afraid this is a Philadelphia-minted 1975 Roosevelt dime and NOT a 1975 no-S proof. Because this piece is worn and shows signs of environmental damage, it’s worth face value.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Annabel —

      This is an authentic 1975 dime, but I’m afraid it’s not the proof no-mintmark piece mentioned in this article. This piece is a normal dime minted at the Philadelphia Mint which, in the 1970s, did not place a “P” mintmark on its dimes. This one is worth face value.

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Younis —

      What you have here is a regular-issue Philadelphia-strike Roosevelt dime worth face value and unfortunately not the 1985 no-S proof Roosevelt dime found only in proof sets.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Ahmed—

      These are unfortunately just regular-issue Roosevelt dimes from the Philadelphia Mint, which did not place mintmarks in dimes in 1975. The no-S proof variety is found only in proof sets.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Ahmed —

      The Philadelphia-struck 1975 Roosevelt dimes struck for circulation were not struck with P mintmarks, so these are normal circulation strikes worth face value. The rare 1975 no-S Roosevelt dime will be found only in collector proof sets, which ordinarily DO contain S mintmarks.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
  5. First, thank you very much for the response ..

    Sir, I have a lot of dime from 1975, but no one was like the one I sent you pictures of ..

    Sir, this dime always appears prominent and clear, but there is a protective layer on both sides that prevents photography from showing full details.

    I don’t know how to clean or remove protective layers …

    I am afraid to destroy it or do stupid damage it …

    I will send you a picture and prove my words to you https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a2add6ff6048ff58c39596a7e14c645af3b1b2067e6968cd7ff07f3a6ddf622a.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/5158e4ade641b648100e286d8bf7a96f2ab94ba6013e82ff05a0c000f1931968.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/af4237710472df2024cbe1a921e36d4680eff366f25ece12a7ab46214f21d8eb.jpg

    Reply
    • Hi, Ahmed —

      Thank you for reaching out… This is indeed a 1975 Roosevelt dime, however it is a common variety from the Philadelphia Mint — which didn’t place mintmarks on its dimes at the time. The valuable no-mintmark dime you’ve read about is the 1975 proof version found only in the collector’s proof set from that year. While the photos you sent are not of the rare 1975 proof no-mintmark dime, I wish you the best of luck in finding one!

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Yazar —

      This is a business-strike 1970 Philadelphia Mint dime, which shouldn’t have any mintmark. It is worth its face value.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi Griffin,

      I’m guessing you hope this is the 1975 no-S proof dime, new examples of which can only be discovered in 1975 proof sets. Unfortunately this is a regular business-strike issue from the Philadelphia Mint, which didn’t place mintmarks on its dimes in 1975. This one is worth face value due to the circulation wear.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Ahmed —

      You have a circulation-strike Philadelphia dime, which should have no mintmark and is worth 10 cents; I’m afraid the valuable 1975 no-S proof some is found only in proof sets…

      All my best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Ahmed —

      There is some definite spread in the date but hard to see the other details. I suggest you submit this coin to a reputable third-party coin grading firm, such as Professional Coin Grading Service (www.pcgs.com) or Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (www.ngccoin.com), or the variety experts at CONECA (www.varietyvista.com) for further in-hand evaluation.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Thank you sir…
        By virtue of your experience,, in coins, sir what is the percentage if i send this coin to the classification company for it to be the desired coin?

        Reply
        • Hi, Ahmed —

          Nothing to me, I am helping out here without charge or fee percentage… However, thank you for inquiring!

          Good luck to you,
          Josh

          Reply

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