2010 Abraham Lincoln Dollar Coin Value (See Which Lincoln Dollar Coins Are Worth $100 Or More!)



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The 2010 Abraham Lincoln dollar coin is one of the most popular Presidential $1 coins.

Abraham Lincoln dollar coin value
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The Presidential $1 coin series ran from 2007 through 2016 and includes one dollar coin for every president who served in the White House, but who has since passed away.

Golden dollar coins in this special series were issued in the sequence that each president served. So, as Lincoln was the 16th president of the United States (and, of course, all presidents serving before him are also deceased), he appears on the 16th coin in the series.

Abraham Lincoln is widely regarded as one of the nation’s most popular presidents. Not only did he help geopolitically reunify the United States during the divisive Civil War, but he also brought an end to slavery with his 1863 Emancipation Proclamation. He has appeared on many coins — including the Lincoln penny and 2009 Abraham Lincoln commemorative dollar, which honors the 200th birthday of the president’s birth.

It is therefore little wonder that the 2010 Lincoln dollar is one of the most sought-after of the Presidential $1 coins!

  • How much is an Abraham Lincoln dollar coin worth?
  • Which ones are the most valuable?
  • Are there any errors and varieties to be found on Lincoln dollars?
  • What are some tips for collecting these coins?

Read on to find the answers to those questions… and more.

Abraham Lincoln Dollar Coin Value

Most 2010 Lincoln dollars are worth face value, if worn. So, if you find a normal Abraham Lincoln dollar in your pocket change, it’s safe to spend it.

However, uncirculated and proof Lincoln dollar coins are worth significantly more:

  • 2010-P Abraham Lincoln dollar, uncirculated — $1.50+
  • 2010-D Abraham Lincoln dollar, uncirculated — $1.50+
  • 2010-S Abraham Lincoln dollar, proof — $3+

*Values are for coins that are typical for their grade and that are not cleaned or otherwise damaged.

Where Is The Date & Mintmark On Abraham Lincoln Dollars?

Trying to find the mintmark on your Lincoln dollar — so you can find out where it was made? Look on the edge of the coin!

Unlike most modern United States coins — which have the date, mintmark, and mottoes either on the obverse (front) or reverse (back) — the Presidential $1 coins have these inscriptions on their edges.

Presidential Dollar Edge Lettering
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Placing these inscriptions on the edge of the coin helped to free up more space on the obverse and reverse for the special designs — but it also led to a number of errors and varieties relating to the edge lettering!

Lincoln Dollar Coin Errors To Look For

Here are 3 of the most well-known Presidential dollar error coins and how much they’re worth…

#1 – Dollar Coins Missing Edge Lettering

A missing edge lettering dollar is made when the coin skips the step of the minting process in which the edge inscriptions are applied to the coin. It’s the type of error that gave rise to the so-called Godless dollars of 2007 — before the motto “IN GOD WE TRUST” was moved from the edge of the Presidential $1 coins to the obverse.

And while the missing edge lettering error is encountered with some frequency on other Presidential $1 coins, it’s apparently quite rare on the Lincoln dollar. As of this writing, no missing edge lettering Lincoln Presidential dollar coins have been located.

What would one be worth if it were found?

Presumably, the discovery specimen could sell for thousands of dollars if it were the only known example upon being offered for sale! Then, as more and more examples are theoretically located, the value would most likely decrease.

Other missing edge lettering dollar coins are worth between $50 and $150, depending on the main design of the coin and condition.

#2 – Dollar Coins With Weak Edge Lettering

Variations of this error show little of the edge lettering on the 2010 Lincoln dollars.

This is a considerably scarce variety.

Values range from $50 to more than $500, depending on the grade of the coin.

#3 – Dollar Coins With Doubled Edge Lettering

A type of doubled die is known on some Lincoln dollars that features doubling of the edge lettering.

These errors are both very scarce and quite popular.

Examples of this cool variety are worth between $200 and $300.

Tips For Collecting Abraham Lincoln Dollar Coins

Whether your 2010 Abraham Lincoln dollars are worth face value or tons of money, they make excellent collectibles!

2010 Abraham Lincoln Dollar Coin
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Here are a few ways that coin collectors include the Lincoln dollars in their collections:

  • Some coin collectors will include the 2010 Abraham Lincoln dollars in a larger collection of Presidential $1 coins.
  • Many collectors build a so-called P-D-S set of Abraham Lincoln dollars. That is, they include one uncirculated example each from the Philadelphia and Denver Mints and then a proof specimen from the San Francisco Mint. (These coins may or may not be part of a complete Presidential $1 coin set.)
  • Others will include Lincoln dollar coins in a topical set themed around only coins that contain Lincoln’s likeness.
  • Then, there are collectors who collect modern proof sets or uncirculated sets — which, in 2010, were packaged with examples of the Lincoln dollar.

There is no “right” way to collect the Lincoln dollar. It’s best to build a collection that incorporates the Abraham Lincoln dollar coins in a way that suits you and your unique collecting tastes!

Joshua

I'm the Coin Editor here at TheFunTimesGuide. My love for coins began when I was 11 years old. I primarily collect and study U.S. coins produced during the 20th century. I'm a member of the American Numismatic Association (ANA) and the Numismatic Literary Guild (NLG) and have won multiple awards from the NLG for my work as a coin journalist. I'm also the editor at the Florida United Numismatists Club (FUN Topics magazine), and author of Images of America: The United States Mint in Philadelphia (a book that explores the colorful history of the Philadelphia Mint). I've contributed hundreds of articles for various coin publications including COINage, The Numismatist, Numismatic News, Coin Dealer Newsletter, Coin Values, and CoinWeek. I've authored nearly 1,000 articles here at The Fun Times Guide to Coins (many of them with over 50K shares), and I welcome your coin questions in the comments below!

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