Some Thomas Jefferson Dollar Coin Errors Are Worth $400 Or More! Find Out The Value Of Your Jefferson Dollars Here



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The 2007 Thomas Jefferson dollar coin is one of the most widely collected of the Presidential $1 coins — which were issued from 2007 through 2016.

Thomas Jefferson dollar coin value
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The Jefferson Presidential dollar is a pretty common coin, as more than 200 million were made.

But a small number have rare errors and varieties, making some Jefferson dollars quite valuable!

Here are the errors and varieties you should be looking for, and how much these rare Thomas Jefferson dollar coins are worth…

Thomas Jefferson Dollar Coin Value

Chances are if you’ve found a Jefferson Presidential $1 coin in your pocket change, a bank roll, or elsewhere in circulation, it’s worth only face value.

But what about those valuable errors and varieties on Jefferson dollar coins? Ah, yes…

There are many known oddities to be found on Presidential dollars, and the Thomas Jefferson dollar coin is no exception.

Here are some of the things you should be looking for on Jefferson dollar coins and how much these dollar coin errors are worth…

#1 – Jefferson Dollar Die Clashes

When 2 dies come together without a planchet in between them, a die clash error occurs. A die clash error presents as some of the opposing die’s design appearing on the other die. Or, there could be other forms of damage occurring from the die clash. At any rate, die clash errors are highly collectible.

Jefferson dollar die clash errors often sell for $30 or more when they come to market.

#2 – Jefferson Dollar Doubled Dies

Collectors have reported the appearance of some Thomas Jefferson dollar coin doubled dies. One such report involves the reverse (tails side), on which some gown folds on the Statue of Liberty are doubled on the 2007-P Jefferson dollar coin.

Not many of these coins have traded in the marketplace, so prices are all over the charts. But similar doubled dies have generally sold for anywhere from $50 to $100.

#3 – Weak Edge Lettering On Jefferson Dollar Coins

One of the most common and popular types of errors among Presidential $1 coins involves the edge lettering. No edge lettering. Some edge lettering. Messed up edge lettering. Such errors are so numerous — in part because the edge lettering was applied to the Presidential $1 coins in a separate step from the obverse (heads side) and reverse striking. This extra step often got fouled up for one reason or another.

One such error is the weak edge lettering error, also known as the semi-smooth edge error. This error shows the edge lettering stamped very lightly onto the edge of the coin. It’s a scarce error worth around $50.

Presidential dollar coin errors to look for
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#4 – Partial Edge Lettering On Jefferson Dollar Coins

Jefferson dollar partial edge lettering errors are sought after by collectors. However, they aren’t necessarily as rare as the weak edge lettering dollar.

The partial edge lettering dollar is worth around $30.

#5 – Missing Edge Lettering On Jefferson Dollar Coins

Talk about a rare Jefferson dollar!…

Those missing their edge lettering are among the rarest types known — much rarer than the George Washington Godless dollars!

As the name of this error implies, the edge of these Jefferson dollar errors is completely smooth, no letters — not even the trace of one character. This happened because the coin totally skipped the edge lettering process altogether — which is something the United States Mint bent over backward trying to avoid by the time this third Presidential dollar coin came along.

Nevertheless, perhaps a few thousand examples of the Jefferson dollar escaped the U.S. Mint without the edge lettering. These rare coins originally sold for as much as $5,000. Today, they’re worth closer to $400.

#6 – Jefferson Dollar Out Of Sequence Edge Motto

And speaking of edge lettering, here’s a doozy of an error…

The edge lettering on Presidential dollars is supposed to occur in a particular sequence. Normally, the inscriptions read 2007 (mintmark) — E PLURIBUS UNUM — IN GOD WE TRUST. However, on some 2007-S proof Jefferson dollars, the inscriptions were reversed, reading 2007-S — IN GOD WE TRUST — E PLURIBUS UNUM.

Apparently, a mint worker setting the individual segments of the edge lettering device misplaced the arrangement of the mottoes.

What is less evident is just how many of these errors occurred. As of this writing, this particular error seems unique to Jefferson dollar coins. And it’s extremely rare since only a handful of these pieces have turned up in all the years since the coin was struck in 2007.

How much such an error is worth could be anyone’s guess, but the individual who discovered the strange piece wanted $10,000 for his edge error Jefferson dollar!

How Much Are Normal Jefferson Dollars Worth?

Thomas Jefferson dollar coin
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The Jefferson dollar coin errors listed above are particularly scarce. That means you’re not likely to simply turn over the next Thomas Jefferson dollar coin that pops up in your hand and land any of the errors mentioned here — but, hey, stranger things have happened.

So, the vast majority of Jefferson dollars are totally normal — nothing odd about them at all. What are they worth?

As mentioned earlier, any Jefferson dollar you find in circulation that has wear and no signs of errors or varieties is worth only face value… $1. No exceptions there.

But what about uncirculated and proof Jefferson dollars — the kinds that have no wear and look like they came right from the U.S. Mint?

Here’s what uncirculated and proof, albeit typical, Jefferson dollars are worth:

  • 2007-P Jefferson Dollar — 100,800,000 minted, $2+
  • 2007-D Jefferson Dollar — 102,810,000 minted, $2+
  • 2007-S proof Jefferson Dollar — 3,965,989 minted, $3.50+

*Values are for typical uncirculated and proof specimens with problem-free surfaces. 

Joshua

I'm the Coin Editor here at TheFunTimesGuide. My love for coins began when I was 11 years old. I primarily collect and study U.S. coins produced during the 20th century. I'm a member of the American Numismatic Association (ANA) and the Numismatic Literary Guild (NLG) and have won multiple awards from the NLG for my work as a coin journalist. I'm also the editor at the Florida United Numismatists Club (FUN Topics magazine), and author of Images of America: The United States Mint in Philadelphia (a book that explores the colorful history of the Philadelphia Mint). I've contributed hundreds of articles for various coin publications including COINage, The Numismatist, Numismatic News, Coin Dealer Newsletter, Coin Values, and CoinWeek. I've authored nearly 1,000 articles here at The Fun Times Guide to Coins (many of them with over 50K shares), and I welcome your coin questions in the comments below!

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