Want Valuable Pennies? Here Are 10 Pennies You Should Be Looking For

This post may contain affiliate links. If you buy thru these links, we may earn a commission at no additional cost to you.


After years of writing coin articles, I have discovered that there is one coin everybody seems to always be asking about: pennies!

In fact, one of the most common questions people usually have about pennies concern which ones are the most valuable.

the most valuable pennies

Thankfully for coin collectors, there are plenty of valuable pennies to be looking for.

Let’s take a look at 10 of the most valuable pennies among rare U.S. coins…

 

10 Most Valuable Pennies

Let’s start off this list of valuable pennies with the most expensive and work on down to the least-most expensive (make sense?).

Of course, there are always new price records being set and expensive varieties being discovered.

Just so you know, this list doesn’t count large cents of 1793 through 1857.

Yes, those are often referred to those large copper coins as pennies, too — but for the sake of this article, only small cents (those made since 1856) will be covered.

 

Lincoln Bronze Cents of 1943

Any of the 1943 bronze cents, as a group, currently belong to the heading of ‘most-valuable pennies.’ While the 1943 steel cent is a common coin, with hundreds of millions made, the United States Mint mistakenly struck somewhere between 20 to 40 of the 1943 cents from the bronze blanks normally used for pennies of other years.

A 1943-D bronze cent was recently sold for $1.7 million!

Other 1943 bronze cents have sold for between $80,000 and $200,000 in recent years.

 

1944 Steel Cents

OK, so we have the 1943 bronze cents… but have you heard about the 1944 steel cents? A reverse of the same mistake that caused the bronze cents of 1943 created a small number of steel cents the following year.

1944 steel cents don’t seem to have the same degree of attention that their earlier bronze counterparts enjoy, but 1944 steel cents are still highly rare and valuable.

In recent years, 1944 steel cents have sold for over $100,000!

 

1969-S Double Die Cent

Think Lincoln Memorial cents aren’t worth much? Think again. There are plenty of valuable Lincoln Memorial pennies, and the 1969-S double die takes the cake!

The doubling on the 1969-S double die (which is not a proof but, rather, a regular strike) is seen mainly in the lettering and date on the obverse of this rare coin. With very few in existence and ever-soaring demand, the 1969-S double die is easily worth over $50,000.

 

1856 Flying Eagle Cent

Our journey along the path of the most valuable pennies takes us back to the very first ‘small size’ one-cent coin in the U.S. Up until the late 1850s, our one cent coin had always been nearly as large as a half-dollar.

But waning purchasing power pressed the need for a small one-cent coin. Enter the 1856 Flying Eagle cent – the first official U.S. penny the size of modern-day one-cent coins.

Only 2,000 1856 Flying Eagle cents were made, and each is worth a pretty penny. Prices start at over $6,500 for well-worn specimens and tick up in value to over $15,000 for pieces in uncirculated grades.

 

1955 Double Die Cent

When the 1955 double die Lincoln cent first emerged, it quickly became a coin that everybody wanted but, due to low numbers of available pieces, not everybody could have. Today, the 1955 double die penny remains an extremely sought-after coin that is especially in demand among Lincoln cent collectors.

Doubling in the date and lettering is where coin collectors notice the ghost-like double image on this error cent that’s worth between $1,000 and $15,000.

 

1888/7 Indian Head Cent

This list of valuable pennies is mainly dominated by errors and varieties, and you’re probably beginning to see why — they’re generally rare and are pieces that many coin collectors love to own because they’re so neat.

The 1888 over 7 Indian Head cent is another one of those coins that are rare and sought-after by coin collectors.

While the Indian Head cent series is not nearly as widely collected as Lincoln cents, Indian Head cents are popularly collected by date and mintmark, and the 1888/7 Indian Head cent is one of those pieces that Indian Head cent lovers simply feel they have to have.

If you’re going to buy one, however, you’ll need to dig pretty deep into your wallet or purse… prices begin at around $900 for a well-worn example!

 

1877 Indian Head Cent

Think of the most popular rarity among Indian Head cents, and it’s likely your mind turns to the 1877 Indian Head cent. The 1877 penny is the stuff of Indian Head cent collectors’ dreams. And for good reason — it’s the rarest regular-strike coin in the series and downright expensive in even the most-worn grades.

A little more than 850,000 were struck (a tiny number by modern-day standards). Because the 1877 cent is required for completion of an Indian Head penny collection, there are simply  not enough to fill every Indian Head cent collection.

Prices start at around $900 for a well-worn example and ascend into the $3,000 to $5,000 range for typical uncirculated pieces.

 

1909-S VDB Lincoln Cent

I bet you were wondering where this famous coin would show up on this list. Is there really any more popular of a coin in the world (outside of the 1804 dollar) than the 1909-S VDB Lincoln cent? I submit the answer is no.

Virtually everybody seems to know about ‘the 1909 penny.’ Now more than a century old, the 1909-S VDB cent has been building in both legendary status and value for generations.

What makes the 1909-S VDB cent so important is that it bears Victor David Brenner’s initials (VDB) and was made at the San Francisco mint (which is why there is an ‘S’ under the date). Only 484,000 1909-S VDB cents were ever made — and the number of people who collect Lincoln cents may be well into the millions.

Clearly, there simply aren’t enough 1909-S VDB Lincoln pennies to go around. If you can afford to lay out around $800 to $1,000, you’ll be able to buy a nice but well-worn 1909-S VDB cent for your coin collection. $2,000 to $3,000 will land you an example in uncirculated grade.

 

1922 Plain Cent

When people first found a 1922 penny without a mintmark, they assumed it was simply a Philadelphia version of a 1922 cent. That’s a perfectly reasonable assumption, especially since pennies made in Philadelphia — even to this day — don’t bear a mint mark. However, there’s one slight problem to that reasoning: Philadelphia didn’t make any pennies in 1922!

So, what caused the 1922 plain cent? Only Denver struck pennies that year (and not too many, either, at only around 7 million!). It’s believed that the ‘D’ mint mark was accidentally removed from the die (the stamp that impresses images on coins) when mint officials tried to fix damage to it.

You’re going to come across many 1922 cents that don’t have much, if any, evidence of a ‘D.’ However, the most valuable types of 1922 no-D Lincoln cents are those which have a weak-looking obverse (heads side) and strong, bold reverse (the tails side). True 1922 plain cents are worth around $700 to $1,000 in lower grades.

 

1909-S Indian Head Cent

1909 was a wild year for pennies. There are several cents from that year which are worth much, much more than face value. But the 1909-S Indian Head cent is the 2nd-most expensive penny from that year.

With only 309,000 made (less than even the 1909-S VDB penny), the 1909-S Indian cent is a sought-after rarity that is high on the list of those who collect Indian pennies. At around $400 to $500 for well-worn examples, the 1909-S Indian cent is a piece that any coin collector would be proud to own.

 

Here’s a video I made showing many of the rare and valuable pennies:

 

Don’t miss our latest tips!

Stay up to date with everything about U.S Coins

We don’t spam! Read more in our privacy policy

396 thoughts on “Want Valuable Pennies? Here Are 10 Pennies You Should Be Looking For”

  1. IS there any value on the VDB penny that doesn’t show the mint letter/? How would one go about finding the true value of this penny?

    Reply
    • MB,

      The ‘true’ value of a VDB penny without the ‘S’ mintmark is about $8 to $12 in worn grades and around $25 to $30 and up for those that have no wear whatsoever.

      Reply
    • Love,

      It depends on the grade. Let’s assume the coin in question is worn to Good (generally the lowest collectible grade for most coins), has normal brown coloring, and has no porosity, bends, holes, or other damage; such a piece is worth about $50.

      If your piece the coin has any type of damage whatsoever (including being cleaned), its value goes down significantly from there.

      Hope this helps!

      Reply
  2. I have an 1888 Indian Head cent. The last 8 looks different. Is there a way to tell if it’s a 1888/7 by looking at it? If not, who should I contact?

    Reply
    • Hi, Hands —

      While there are a number of possible little error-related (or even damage issues) that could affect the way the last ‘8’ looks, it’s always possible that it is the rare 1888/7 overdate; die cuds, die chips, or die breaks are possible for explaining the different-looking ‘8’ on your coin.

      You could always post a photo on The Fun Times Guide to Coins Facebook page if you’d like and that may help with an explanation. Here’s the link: https://www.facebook.com/#!/TheFunTimesGuideToCoins

      Here’s another link you’ll want to check out; it’s a coin forum board that discusses the very issue of the 1888/7 Indian cent, along with a talk about some of the characteristics of the piece; because it’s often hard to see the ‘7’ under the ‘8,’ you must also check for other things on the coin that are seen on the error piece: https://www.coincommunity.com/forum/topic.asp?ARCHIVE=true&TOPIC_ID=29296

      Hope this helps!

      Reply
    • Not in the case of the 1916; that’s what a regular Philadelphia-minted cent should look like. Yours is worth around 20 to 50 cents.

      Reply
  3. Hi, LMC —

    It might be machine doubling, which is a common defect on coins — it’s when a coin gets struck twice with a slight rotation in how the coin is sitting in the collar that holds the coins while it’s being struck.

    If you wouldn’t mind, you could post a photo at The Fun Times Guide to Coins Facebook page and maybe we can give a better opinion though; here’s the link: https://www.facebook.com/#!/TheFunTimesGuideToCoins

    Reply
    • Gina,

      The value of your 1943-D pennies really depends on their condition. A typical worn 1943-D steel cent is worth around 10 to 25 cents. However, those that are in lower-end uncirculated (not worn) grades are worth $1 to $2. If they are in gem uncirculated grades, they could easily be worth $10 each or more.

      Reply
  4. I have a 1909 Indian penny, it has a small s below the wreath on the back. It looks brand new like it was punched last year…not even a scratch. Could this coin be real and if it is is it worth anything.

    Reply
    • Hi Bert,

      The value of your 1858 Flying Eagle cent varies upon its condition. Many are corroded, porous, or heavily worn and therefore worth $10 to $20. If it has only moderate wear and no damage, it’s worth closer to the $30 to $50 range.

      Reply
  5. I HAVE SEVERAL 1930 WHEAT PENNIES, 1932S, 35S, 36, 36D, 37, 37S 38D, 39S AND A 1934. THE THING IS THAT ALL THE ONES ABOVE HAVE THE SAME SHAPE 3. THE 3 ON THE 1934 HAS AN ELONGATED TAIL JUST LIKE THE NUMBER 9 ON THE COIN AND THE TOP OF THE 3 IS LEANING TOWARDS LINCOLN. I DO NOT HAVE ANOTHER 1934 TO COMPARE IT WITH. IS THE CASE WITH ALL 1934’S

    Reply
    • Yes, Frank — in fact, the unique, elongated ‘3’ in all 1934 pennies is a great example of how one can easily know the year of certain coins based on the minor (though sometimes major) differences in design or minting which occur throughout a coin series. If you closely examine each of your coins, you’ll begin noticing patterns as to the shape of certain numerals or letters, and you’ll even see minor differences in mintmark placement on older coins.

      Reply
  6. I have a 1929 D Wheat Cent (the D is filled in) there is no rim and it is VERY thin (like a top layer that was struck both sides. Do you think this is an actual ‘error’ coin? if it is what would oiit be worth?

    Reply
  7. 1969 s single strike penny with a edge that is missing on a small part. Does not appear to have been cut or hit but the side is slightly missing for about double the thickness of the outside bezel. 

    Reply
  8. i have got a 2009 prnny this penny has a man standing next to the white house and is mint shap, is this penny  worth anything?

    Reply
  9. I have a 2009 penny, this penny has a man standing and pointing to the whitehouse,can you tell me if this has any value to it.

    Reply
    • The 2009 centenial lincoln penny has renewed interest in coin collecting. there are 4 versions and 2 mints of 2009 pennies . worth a few cents to some collectors as evidence by ebay sales

      Reply
  10. Hi I have a 1956 D (appears to be) steel penny that i can’t find anything about.

    i can find plenty on the 1944 D steel penny, but not 1956 D,

    Any suggestions? Check out the picture. 

    Reply
  11. Hello, i have found an indian head penny with the numbers 190 for the date??  seems to be in better than average condition and even under a microscope it looks like the last digit was never there. ever heard of this type of odd  coin before?
    thanks for your time

    Reply
  12. I have a 1968 penny were Lincoln rises up higher than others, and In God We Trust is bent. Is it worth anything?!

    Reply
  13. Hello, I just came across a 1944 D Wheat Penny, on the back, it looks as though it was “cut” or slashed. The odd part is, the “slash” does not go all the way through to the front. I’m going to try and explain the front of the coin best I can. Imagine you did cut the penny , and looking on the back, you cut it just a hair in from the beginning of the E in the word CENT. The front then looks like you took the cut piece and made an impression on the left side of the front of the coin. I can make out a light impression of the feather, I can see a C in Lincoln’s hair, I can also see another number I beleive on his jacket. But , that does not explain how right above the word LIBERTY, is (backwards) MUNU. Does anyone know of such a misprint or mistake made like this??? What are your thoughts???? BTW, the reason I just came across this is because we have been going through items that the previous home owner’s family left behind. We have found a few treasures so far……
    Thank you!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
    • Dovelamp –

      Thank you for your comment! Please keep checking back to The Fun Times Guide to Coins for new and exciting articles.

      Reply
  14. I have a 1976 D penny that I have had since I was a little girl. It looks like it could be gold or brass and has a liberty bell and a USA map stamped on the front. I have found lots of info on regular pennies that have been stamped by private people or companies (like the JFK penny) but I haven’t been able to find any information about why this penny is the color it is. My question is…What is the story behind this penny? Should I keep it? Is it valuable? 

    I have attached a picture if it helps but the picture doesn’t do this penny justice. It’s much prettier in person ;)Thank you so much.Jen

    Reply
  15. I found a 1908 Indian penny in the woods, and It’s in pretty good shape. It also has an S stamped on it. could It be worth anything?

    Reply
    • Nice find, Adam! The fact you found that coin in the woods leads me to wonder if it has any damage, but a 1908-S Indian Head cent without any signs of porosity, major nicks, bends, holes, or other damage is worth around $60 and up.

      Reply
      • Thanks! The features are really clear and bold, except the liberty head band has a few letters that are tough to make out. when I found out it was some what rare I thought I’d look into it.

        Reply
  16. I have an 1860 one cent Indian Head coin in Very Fine (I believe) condition – hardly looks circulated; and I have a 1862 Once Cent Indian Head coint, probably Very Good condition – looks worn.  Can you tell me their approximate worth>

    Reply
    • Hi, Bob –

      If the grades you’ve provided are accurate and there is no damage (heavy nicks, cleaning, gouges,etc.) to your coins, the 1860 Indian cent is worth around $15-$20 and the 1862 about $10.

      Reply
  17. Hi Josh, I inherited a suitcase full of pennies (probably 50 lbs or so).  I have actually had them for about 10 years, but I am finally going to start digging through them.  Any tips to get through them easily and how to deposit the normal valued cents?  Also, are the actually copper pennies worth more than one cent? 

    Reply
    • Hi, Sunnygirl –

      Wow, hopefully you’ll find some coins well worth keeping in that suitcase. For starters, I would divide everything this way:

      Pre-1959 (Indian cents/Lincoln wheat cents)
      1959-1981 (Copper Lincoln Memorial cents)
      1982-present (Zinc Lincoln Memorial/Union Shield cents)

      Except for errors, the 1982-present Lincoln cents really have no value except face.

      Those struck from 1959-1982 are copper-based Lincoln cents that have a copper value of roughly 3 cents *Legal sidenote – you cannot legally melt copper Lincoln cents for their metal value. However, many coin dealers will buy them for 1.5 – 3 cents each. Roll these and consider offering them to a dealer who pays more than face for them.

      Here’s some info on Lincoln Memorial cents:

      * https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/lincoln_penny/

      For the Lincoln wheat cents, you’ll want to search for the dates listed in these two articles:

      * https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/rare_wheat_pennies/

      * https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/lincoln_semi_key_coins/

      For all the unmentioned Lincoln wheat cents that are without errors, they’re worth about 3 to 10 cents each and should be rolled and sold to a coin dealer.

      If you happen to be lucky enough to find any Indian Head pennies in that suitcase, you’ll want to read this:

      * https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/indian_heady_penny_value/

      Good luck!

      Reply
  18. I noticed on the new 2010 lincoln penny it looks like a crack on the right sholder of linclon.. just wondering if anyone else noticed this also.

    Reply
    • Hi, Birchtree –

      Both your 1944 and 1955 Lincoln cents are worth around 10 cents. If you still want to sell them, consider placing them on eBay for the best chance of profit.

      Reply
    • Hi, Patman –

      You actually have a novelty coin, specially made using two real Lincoln cents. These were made by an individual for the sake of entertainment and have no numismatic value.

      Reply
  19. i metal detect and have dug some nice coins including pennies. recently i dug an 1869 indian head that believe it or not is in excellent condition. maybe because it is bronze idk. also i have dug an 1805 large cent, 1850 large cent ( which is immaculant beside the bend straight down mid from plow) another large cent nearly a slug from corrosion but can make out the bust on back, another indian head and a flying eagle that has corrosion but salvageable. i just do not know the correct way to clean them without ruining them. 2 half cents 1809, 2 -3 cent pieces, also an 1752 II reale i think its called! i really wish i knew how to clean the copper up. also pretty sure older coins were carried by civil war soldier cuz they came from camps.

    Reply
    • Those are some incredible finds! You really don’t want to clean those coins those – you want to keep their original color because that is desirable to coin collectors and investors. If you need to clean off dirt or other debris, run your coins under tepid water and pat them dry with a soft cloth.

      Values for your coins could be given if you could provide photos.

      Good luck on your future searches!

      Reply
  20. I have a 1910 Lincoln penny with a marking under the date I cannot make out.
    Also a 1919 with no mint marking. Do you know what they are worth? Thanks. K

    Reply
    • Hi, Joshua –

      The mintmark under the date is an “S” which stands for San Francisco, which is the location of the branch mint that struck your Lincoln cent. Yours is worth around $7 to $10 if in typical, worn condition.

      Your 1919 Lincoln cent is worth around 25 cents to $1.

      Reply
  21. Hey Joshua,
    I have a Lincoln Penny coin album..the penny dates are from 1909 to 1960..I also have some Indian pennies dated 1897 and 1900. Who can I sell it to? I am from LA. Thanks. Carlos

    Reply
  22. i have an 1864. i guess its a wheat penny but it has the initials J.G. stamped on the indians head. what would this be worth?

    Reply
    • Hi, Jim –

      The initials stamped onto the coin actually make this piece altered, though it is still worth a couple dollars.

      Reply
    • Hi, Cat –

      A 1944-S Lincoln cent is worth around 3 to 5 cents, but if you’re interested in selling it still, you may want to try eBay, as you may get a bidder who’ll pay more than that to complete a collection of Lincoln cents.

      Reply
  23. Who would happen to know some collectors willing to purchase a single 1969-s double die lincoin cent?? I have acquired some other valuable coins as well..

    Reply
  24. was going through my sisters coin collection that she gave me and found an Indian headed coin silver buffalo on the back…. mid condition it says five cents one the bottom of the back any idea what its value is?

    Reply
    • Ander,

      Is the year of the coin visible on your coin? If it is completely dateless, it’s worth around 50 cents.

      Reply
      • i have a double dateded elizabeth 2 d..g.regina wheat penny 1867-1992.on the lower right corner back side has k.g on it whats its worth

        Reply
  25. found a 1542 year coin it says California Dollar on the top of the back and says THE GOLDEN STATE on the bottom it has a bird and bear on it and a guy looking for gold worth anything?

    Reply
  26. i found this one penny on it it say davenport chapter no.16 R.A.M, chaptered june 1st, davenport Iowa 1857 one penny and on the back is what looks like or what ive been told is free mason symbol. If anyone knows anything about this coin can i hear a little background about it and its value.

    Reply
  27. i have a 1962 penney great condition with the letters ABP stamped across the front of the penney have been doing some research on this to find out the value also have indian penney dated back to 1897

    Reply
    • Hi, Delores –

      The letters ABP were not imprinted by the U.S. Mint, so they are likely somebody’s initials. This adds no collector value to the coin.

      The 1897 Indian Head cent, however, is worth around $3 to $5.

      Reply
    • The pennies are made of zinc plated steel. Philidelphias are start about 10-15 cents depending on condition. Denvers start at 20 cents and san fransisco mints start at about30 cents. All prices are for about good condition.

      Reply
    • Hi, Phil –

      Typically, half-off center coins are worth anywhere from $10 to $50, based on exactly what parts of the coin are showing.

      Reply
    • Hi, Edith –

      A typical 1969-S Lincoln cent is worth face value if it has any wear (this would be the case if you found it in pocket change); without wear, it’s worth around 10 to 20 cents. Proof versions (those with mirror-like surfaces) have a value of around $1.

      Reply
  28. Hey Josh,
    I have a 1968 penny that looks goldish on the front, but copper on the back. I was wondering if you have heard about this and what it’s worth? I also have a 2006 dime with what looks like part of the striking maching partical stuck in the back right in the middle of the torch, but doesn’t poke through the front. Any idea in value?

    Reply
    • Hi, Chris –

      As for your 1968 penny, it sounds like it may have been partially gold plated (something commonly done by people outside of the U.S. Mint); this really doesn’t add any value to the coin however.

      As for the dime, it is hard to verify exactly if there was some type of striking error without seeing the coin in hand; perhaps if you could post an image of the coin here in the comments section I could try and ascertain precisely what is going on as well as a possible estimate on the value.

      Thanks!

      Reply
  29. My husband has been saving pennies for over 30 years……..Please let us know what years should we just return to the bank?

    Reply
  30. hi, i have a 1991 p kennedy half dollar, i looked up on another website and it said it’s worth 4 to 5 dollar’s, but a minute ago i found out on the bottom of the neck of kennedy there was a shape like an R a little is that worth anything or is that something that’s on every kennedy half dollar? also is the 1943-D bronze penny really worth 1.7 million? thanks,

    Reply
    • Hi, Anon –

      The little “R” you mentioned seeing on the Kennedy half dollar is part of the initial of Gilroy Roberts, who designed the obverse of the Kennedy half dollar. Unless it is in mint condition, your Kennedy half is worth face value.

      It is true that the 1943-D bronze penny can bring over $1 million, but these prices vary as these coins, which are very few in number, appear on auction.

      Reply
  31. I have a 1937 wheat penny in excellent condition. It bears no mint marking. Lincoln has no beard on the coin though. How much is the penny worth?

    Reply
  32. I have a 2009 penny with a picture of lincoln on the back standing in front of whats possibly the white house. I looked up if it was rare (for a 2009 penny) and it said it was. Now I’m just wondering if it’s worth anything or not.

    Reply
    • Hi, KTM –

      If by rare you mean that they were made for only a short time during a single year, then you might say they are scarce in that sense. However, tens of millions of Lincoln/White House cents were made during the last few months of 2009, and are not really worth more than face value unless in pristine uncirculated condition. Here’s some more info on these 2009 Lincoln cents: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/2009_lincoln_cent/

      Reply
    • Hi, Jaee –

      You have a type of novelty coin that was counterstamped with the Illinois state profile. These are worth about 50 cents to $1 to any collector so inclined to collect such pieces.

      Reply
  33. I metal detect a lot, mostly for relics, but pick up a lot of spare change along the way. Thank you for your information on what pennies in particular to be aware of. Also, you have the patience of a saint to answer some of these inquiries I have read here.

    Reply
  34. I have a penny that has “UNCIRCULATED PHILADELPHIA” with a large P in the center on one side and “UNITED STATES TREASURY” and the treasury seal in the center. What is it?

    Reply
    • Hi, Kyle –

      Yes, your pennies are worth more than face value; the 1918 and 1924 are each worth around 20 cents while the 1940 Lincoln cent comes in at around 10 cents.

      Reply
  35. Hello Joshua.. I have a wheat cooper Pennie that reads 194 D I think its rare but do not know for sure. Can you give me a little more insight..

    Reply
    • Hello,

      Sounds like your Lincoln cent is the victim of a filled die, which means part of the stamp used to impart the image on your coin was filled with grease or debris. Your coin may have also been weakly struck. In either circumstance, your coin really doesn’t have a premium value, as no 1940-decades Lincoln cent struck at Denver (the “D” mintmark) is really scarce, and the type of situation you describe does not warrant a higher value.

      Reply
  36. Hey Joshua, i found a 1906 indian head penny, it seems to be silver colored on the face and more of a bronze color on the back. Looking at it from the side it looks almost as if the front and back are joined together?

    Reply
    • Hi, Doug –

      It could be the case that they’ve been fused together; do you see some type of seam running around the edge of the coin? If you do, that’s a clear giveaway that the piece is simply two adjoined faces formed to make a “coin.”

      Reply
  37. I have a 1906 indian head penny, it is silver color on the face and more of a bronze color on the back. Looking at it from the side it looks as though there is a seam that joins the front and back?

    Reply
  38. Hi i have a coin that looks silver. On one side it says :FID:DEF:IND:IMP:TWO SHILLINGS 1948: In the middle there’s the pic of a crown flower. on the left of flower theres a crown with the initial G. onthe right side theres a tree or flower with the letter R under it. underthe main flower theres a stalk with two leaves.
    Back of coin GEORGIVS VI D : G : BR : OMN : REX.
    Can you help is this valuable thank you .

    Reply
  39. I have a 1944 with no mint marker penny, a couple 1969 pennies, the first one the mint marker looks like just a dot and the other there is no mint marker. can you tell me if any are worth anything?

    Reply
  40. I have an Lincoln wheat penny from 1927 and it is warped. It seems to be authentic but I don’t know how much its worth. It seems to me like the copper was still hot when it was struck, causing the copper to buckle. I would say its in fine condition. Would someone help me figure out the price

    Reply
    • Hi, Cody –

      It could also be that the coin has been bent post mint, meaning the coin is considered damaged. If that’s the case, your 1927 Lincoln cent would be worth a few cents.

      Reply
    • Hi, James –

      Unless your 1959-D and 1977-D Lincoln cents are in mint (uncirculated) condition, they are essentially worth face value. But hang onto those, as all pennies made before 1982 are becoming harder to find in pocket change due to their copper content.

      Reply
  41. Hi I have a 1943 Steel Penny and the date is double stamped. I dont see anything in my coo. Book about a 1943 Double Die Steel Penny. What is this worth?

    Reply
    • Hi, Lisa –

      There is no record of any 1943 doubled die Lincoln cents, and while there is always a first, it is more likely that your coin is showing evidence of machine doubling, which doesn’t really add any value to the coin.

      Reply
    • Hi, Cody –

      Without seeing the coin, it’s hard to say if it was a mint error coin that would have some significant value to it, but if it were damage, the coin would really only be worth about face value.

      Reply
    • With regards to the previous comment made on my earlier post, another penny fits perfectly in the part thats missing, which is about 1/15th of the coin. I graded it as VF-20BN. Everything is readable but rhe mint mark is slightly worn, making it hard to read. Overall color is slightly reddish brown. Average circulated 1945 penny worth about $0.10.

      I also have a 1953 D that looks very similar to the 1943 steel cents. It has a metal band around it as if it was made into a necklace at one point. It isn’t magnetic like the 1943’s… Can anybody give me any information on these two coins?

      Thanks,
      Cody

      Reply
  42. i have a whole bottle of wheat pennies and a collectoin book from 1909 to 1977 and i have a penny from 1900 who can i find to tell me there worth and how can i sell them

    Reply
    • Hi, Seamus –

      Is it a “B” or an “S”? If it’s an “S,” your coin is worth around 10 to 15 cents. If it’s a “B,” then that’s a marking left by somebody outside the mint and renders the coin as damaged.

      Reply
  43. I have an 1898 Indian Head Penny but on the back it looks like a fancy letter B is stamped in it… I also have a 1975 lincoln penny that has some extra metal on the front covering up In God and running do the back of Lincoln while there is an indent on the back in the same area. Are either of these worth anything?

    Reply
    • Hi, Christina –

      I would need to see a photo of your 1975 penny to determine what’s going on with the extra metal, but the letter “B” inscribed on the back of your Indian cent was put there by a private individual; it’s still worth a about a dollar or two.

      Reply
    • Hi, Tagoad –

      Well, it is worth a little more than face value, at around 10 to 20 cents, but that’s about it.

      Thanks for your question!

      Reply
  44. Well my mom n dad left me with a collection the oldest Indian Head 1888. Also1809 Half cent 1851 one cent Also a two headed coin which is so worn there is no date or wording but you can see the heads on both sides of the coin can anyone tell me about this

    Reply
    • Hi, Sherry –

      Thanks for your question. Here are values for the coins you mention; values are based on the specific condition of the coins:

      1809 half cent – $30 to $100 or more
      1851 large cent $15 to $50 or more
      1888 Indian Head cent: $2 or more
      Two-headed coin – we will need to see a picture of this coin, please, so we can determine what it is; however, it is likely a novelty coin. You can post images as attachments here in the comments forum.

      Reply
    • Hello,

      You likely have a novelty coin designed for use in a doll house. These types of replica coins actually do have a small collector market and yours could be worth about a dollar.

      Reply
  45. Hello, i have come across in my small collection of odd coins two pennies. One has a B pressed into it that seems to have been done by a machine. The date of this penny is 1988. The second penny is one from 1937 that does not have the memorial on it. instead it clearly says ONE CENT with below it UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. I only wrote in caps to show what it says clearly, not to sound rude in any way.

    Reply
    • Hi, Rebecca –

      The 1988 penny sounds like it was altered by an individual after your coin left the U.S. Mint.

      The 1937 Lincoln cent displays the reverse (tails) design that adorned Lincoln pennies during the years 1909 through 1958. The wheat ear Lincoln cent is an obsolete penny that was replaced by the Lincoln Memorial cent in 1959. While yours is worth around 10 cents, there are some Lincoln wheat cents that have a value of $1,000 or more. Here’s some more info on those scarce Lincoln cents:

      Scarce Lincoln wheat cents: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/lincoln_semi_key_coins/

      Rare Lincoln wheat cents: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/rare_wheat_pennies/

      Reply
  46. I have this 1968 S coin look like he have no hair on face and date and S look double and some letter, I never clean coin. What you think about this 1968 S penny ?

    Reply
    • Hi, Victor –

      It looks to me like the date may have some evidence of machine doubling (not the same thing as a doubled die and really of no extra value unfortunately). This beautiful example of a 1968 Lincoln cent is typical in the sense that pennies from this year had a especially bold looking appearance.

      Reply
    • Hi, Jose –

      It looks like your coin was struck slightly off center; these pieces do garner error collector attention and have a slightly higher value (perhaps 50 cents to $1 in your case) than regular coins of similar date and denomination.

      Reply
  47. JOSHUA HELLO,1955 WHEAT PENNY THIS HAVE DOUBLED DIE WITH ONLY MEETS THE EYE IN FIVE OF THE DATE, WOULD ANY ADDITIONAL VALUE?

    Reply
    • Hi, Jose –

      It looks like there’s a little evidence of machine doubling in the second “5”; this type of error is not worth much more than face value, but in the case of the 1955 Lincoln cent, a machine doubled example is often used as a “filler” piece to lodge into any empty coin album slots designated for the far more pricey 1955 doubled die cent, which is worth around $1,200 and up.

      Reply
  48. I have just got a bunch of coins 1943 D bronze penny & a 1956 bronze and silver plated penny and a 1887 & 1901 Indian head. Can u tell me anything about them? I will try to post the pics of them later if it works for me.

    Reply
  49. I HAVE THREE PENNIES THAT I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW IF THERE VALUABLE A 1942 D PENNIE A 1951 D PENNIE AND A 1953 D PENNIE

    Reply
    • Hello, Patricia –

      Actually, each of your pennies is worth around 3 to 5 cents if they are worn.

      Thanks for your question!

      Reply
    • Hello, Carrol —

      From this perspective, I can’t see any signs of doubling around the lettering or date to indicate that this is a 1969-S doubled die cent.

      A regular, worn 1969-S Lincoln cent is worth face value. However, all Lincoln Memorial cents made before 1982 have about three cents of copper in them; if it should ever become legal to melt pennies, there could be a metals market for Lincoln cents in the coming years.

      Thanks for checking, and all the best!

      Reply
      • Hi Jeff,

        It looks like there was some uneven discoloration on this coin, probably caused by someone’s finger as I see a strong fingerprint across the obverse (head side) of the coin.

        Reply
    • Hi, Jeff –

      Your 1990 pennies, which were made in Philadelphia (a mint that does not put mintmarks on its one-cent coins) are worth face value unless they are in mint condition.

      It was good of you to check, especially since 1990 pennies in proof sets from the U.S. Mint that are plain (no “S” mintmark) are worth $3,000-5,000!

      Thanks for checking with us!

      Reply
  50. I HAVE FOUND 1 1998 AND 3 OF THE 1999 PENNY’S THAT HAVE THE AM STAMPED CLOSER THAN THE REST OF THE LETTERS IN AMERICA, AND A 1984 DBL STAMPED,IN TYPICAL POCKET CHANGE CONDITION ANY IDEA WHAT THEY ARE WORTH? ALSO HAVE A 1918 WORN CONDITION BARELY COULD READ THE DATE. BALL PARK PRICES AND IN ATL WHO WOULD BE THE BEST TO SELL TO???

    Reply
    • Hi Darrell!

      Nice finds! The 1998 close-AM penny is worth around $25 and the 1999 close-AM cents are worth about $400 each. 1984 doubled die Lincoln cents have a value of about $150, and a 1918 Lincoln cent is worth about 20 cents in average circulated condition.

      For an Atlanta area dealer, I would consult the Professional Numismatists Guild (PNG) coin dealer directory to find a reputable dealer near you.

      PNG dealer directory: https://www.pngdealers.org/find-a-png-dealer

      Good luck!

      Reply
      • Ok why is sites all alittle different. One says the 1999 close am are worth $.01. I got 4 now of the 1999 close AM , anyone want to purchase them for a fraction of $400.00
        Shoot I would sell all 4 for the price of 2. DKSOLUTIONSHVACR@gmail.com is where you can find me.

        Reply
        • Hello Darrell,

          The differences in values are caused by several factors, and some of them have to do with what value standard the site is using. When I list values, they are actually an average of different sources that include A Guide Book of United States Coins, Greysheet bid/buy prices, and various other coin periodicals.

          While I might list a value for coins, these are only averages, and the simple answer as to what a coin is really worth is what a person is willing to pay for it. If you want to sell your coins, you may want to start offering them on eBay at a higher buy price and see if anyone bites at the offer. You can always lower the reserve/buy-it-now price if your coins languish.

          Here’s some advice regarding eBay and coins: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/buy_coins_on_ebay/

          And here’s info on finding a good coin dealer: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/coin_dealer/

          Reply
      • OK FOUND OUT THERE IS MUCH MORE TO THIS IT NEEDS TO BE 1998 S OR 1999 S .THE S PART IS THE MONEY MAKER ,WITHOUT IT AINT SQUAT

        Reply
        • Hi Darrell,

          The values I listed are for the Philadelphia versions in mint state with reverses from proof dies. HOWEVER, the obverse has no “S.” So, they don’t have to be “S” (proof coins) to be worth the amounts I suggested.

          Please let me know if you have any further questions!

          Reply
  51. I have 2 different pennies one 2009 with man sitting on a log reading a book
    2009 with a log house on back any body know what there worse

    Reply
  52. I found a brand new shiny penny in a roll from the bank I opened at work. One penny is clearly marked 1968 but that can’t be possible, can it? It appears to be a new coin, not the old copper, Any ideas out there?

    Reply
    • Hi, Kwalz —

      Believe it or not, unciruculated — or very high-end “about uncirculated” pennies do turn up in standard bank rolls with some frequency. Many “new” pennies have been saved in piggy banks and jars for years, even decades, and often only end up back in circulation when the original owners, or their families, wrap the coins up and trade them in at the bank.

      I hope this answers your question!
      -Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Tammy —

      Without seeing a photo of your coin, it sounds like it may be a trick coin used by illusionists or a novelty piece struck solely for the sake of oddity. Such coins with the weight and description you mentioned (thanks for the details!) can’t possibly be produced by the U.S. Mint.

      Thanks for your question,
      -Josh

      Reply
  53. I need help so i heard about the most wanted pennies on the news and i found a 1944 penny and i want to seel it but i dont know how to van you help me ?

    Reply
    • Hello, Ana –

      The 1944 “most wanted” penny would be one that was struck with steel instead of copper.

      Please feel free to post a pic of your 1944 penny so I confirm what you have?

      Thanks,
      -Josh

      Reply
  54. I came across this penny. It has a Lincoln head on one side marked 1935 & a Lincoln head on the other side marked 1945. Can you tell me anything about this penny?

    Reply
    • Hello, Kathee —

      If those two obverse images are on the same coin, then you have what is called a magician’s coin, or illusionist’s coin. Basically, it would be two obverse sides from two real coins soldered together to create a “double headed” coin. They’re also popular for winning bar bets. While they don’t have any numismatic value, they are viewed as novelties in the exonumia realm and are sometimes worth $1 to $2.

      Reply
  55. Hi, My son was out playing in the woods and stumbled across a very large 1972 S penny With Abraham Lincoln on one side and on the back says UNITED STATES oF AMERICA.spelled exactly like that there is some writing along the edges in two spots but i can’t make out what it says :((.I’ve never seen a penny this big in my life Any idea what something like this would be worth?? It is the size of the palm of my hand,Please give me some answers.Thank you, Vanessa

    Reply
  56. Bonnie Gerken Hi, I have a 2009 penny with no mint printed on front and on the back of the back of the penny, Lincoln is standing alongside of the Capitol. Is it worth anything? I’ve never seen this coin before?

    Reply
  57. Hi There, going through some coins my father had. I saw that you mentioned mint sets from 1990 with unmarked pennies (in an older post). Are they really worth $3,000-$5,000? Why??

    Reply
    • Hello, Lisa —

      Great question. Due to a die preparation error, around 200 proof Lincoln cents (the shiny version in hard plastic cases) were made without the “S” mintmark on the obverse near Lincoln; the “S” stands for San Francisco, where modern proof coins are made. The rarity of this error variety has made the coin very, very collectible and has thus helped the coin skyrocket in value. It’s often one of the most-expensive Lincoln cents you’ll see for sale on places like eBay. No kidding!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • I have US Mint Uncirculated Coin Set in sealed clear plastic,in the original envelope, not the hard plastic case. This is not the same as a proof set, correct?

        Reply
        • Hello, Lisa —

          For the most part, you’re correct. That is, all U.S. proof sets made since 1968 are packaged in the hard plastic shell-type cases, while most mint sets are in soft plastic packaging. The only exception to the proof sets are those made before 1965, which were packaged in cellophane.

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
          • So, what I’m asking is, are the pennies I have in this 1990 set part of the one from the mint that are worth so much?

          • Hi, Lisa —

            Based on your description of the government holder, I’m afraid yours is an ordinary 1990 Philadelphia Lincoln cent.

            Thank you for your question,
            Josh

    • Hello, Jimena —

      Generally speaking, 1979 Lincoln cents, especially worn 1979 pennies, aren’t worth more than face value. HOWEVER, all Lincoln Memorial pennies from before 1982 are 95% copper and worth holding aside in case it ever becomes legal to melt copper. The copper value of a 1979 Lincoln cent is about 3 cents.

      Reply
  58. Hi, will these coins mean anything? 2011, 2005, 2008, 2004, 2002, 2000, 1996, 1993, 1984, 1983, 1981, 1977, 1976, 1975, 1970, 1969 pennys?

    Reply
    • Hi, Oliver —

      Be sure to keep all pre-1982 pennies, as they are 95% copper and are worth 2 to 3 cents each.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  59. I came across pennies which were my grandfathers, and they were encased in a glass paperweight. The pennies are dated 1975, and there’s an odd image in front of Lincoln’s face. Are these pennies worth anything, other than face value?

    Reply
    • Hi, Sandy —

      The stamp on the Lincoln cent is from a post mint company. The fact it is encased in lucite (or some other plastic/glass), tells me the logo on the coin is probably from the company from which your dad received the paperweight. While the coin is cleaned and altered, it in itself is generally not worth anything more than face value from the coin collecting standpoint, but the paperweight, with the coin inside, may have collector or historic value of its own, especially if the company is or was well known.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Cesar —

      While the 2007 cent is worth face value, the 2007 is worth around 2 cents for its copper.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  60. Hi, Christian —

    Yes, 1943 steel cents are common but noteworthy coins and are worth between 10 and 25 cents each if worn.

    Best,
    Josh

    Reply
    • Hi, Dae to Day —

      The border is some type of jewelry encasement and is not an original part of the coin. The value of the coin itself is worth its copper value of approximately 2 cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  61. found a Lincoln penny -his face on one side- Lincoln sitting on a log reading a book on the back side –dated 2009. any info would be helpful

    Reply
    • Hi, Alesia —

      From the appearance of your coin in these photos, it appears the coin may have machine doubling, which is an errant issue with the way the die struck the blank coin, and not an issue with doubling of the die itself.

      It should be noted that all 1968 Lincoln cents have an especially bold appearance due to a die variation during the late 1960s.

      At any rate, nice coin!
      Josh

      Reply
  62. I resently diged up a 1981 penny it was in the dirt for a couple of years and has lines going down no letter below the date and I found a 1969 D penny it’s really shinny like as in gold or silver and I want to know the vaule of both.

    Reply
    • Hi, Dominic —

      The 1969-D was definitely plated, and the 1981 appears to have lines due to patination of the copper (the natural aging process); in this case, dirt layering likely caused the lines. Both are worth roughly 2 cents for their copper value.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  63. I also have a 1896 and 1904 Indian head penny any vaule.
    Susan B Anothony Dollar 1980 S
    Eisenhower silver clad 1971 S
    Uncirculated
    And a silver quarter 1964

    Reply
    • Hi, Dominic —

      Here are approximate values for your coins assuming standard wear for their ages:

      *1896 and 1904 Indian cents — $2 each
      *1964 Washington quarter — $3
      *1971-S 40% silver Eisenhower dollar — $4.50
      *1980-S Susan B. Anthony dollar — $1.10

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Tasha —

      If it is a doubled die 1969-S Lincoln cent, yes. However, the vast majority of 1969-S Lincoln cents are worth face value.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  64. I found a coin that looks like a penny but has a Indian on the front I think and in centurion on the back with stars and some kind of vine dated 1974 can’t find it anywhere on Google.

    Reply
    • Hi, Carol —

      Based on your description, it sounds like this is a token of some type, thought a photo would help me do a better job of correctly identifying this for you.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Focus —

      In this case, there’s a comparison between a nearly uncirculated zinc-copper Lincoln cent (the 2014) and a moderately worn copper-based piece (the 1981); these differences explain why the two coins look so unlike the other. Interestingly, 1981 was the last full year that the U.S. Mint used copper-based blanks for circulating pennies, due to the rising cost of copper. Another interesting thing about 1981 Philadelphia pennies (which, like yours, don’t have mintmarks) was that the Mint used a certain kind of wash on pennies from that year, giving some of them a lighter-than-usual appearance. You can sometimes see this by comparing unaltered, unworn 1981 pennies with each other.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  65. Hello I have found a 2007 penny that has me Intrigued. It has a fingerprint over it that seems as if it was an error when being made. I also have a 1974 D penny? Do you know how and if these are of any value?

    Reply
    • Hi, Jessenia —

      I would be glad to take a look at a photo of your 2007 penny if you have one to post, but I would say, not looking at the coin itself, it likely is “just” a fingerprint that was seared onto the coin due to oxidation or patination. Your 1974-D penny is worth 2 cents (so, yes, a little more than face value) due to its intrinsic copper value.

      Thank you for your questions!
      Josh

      Reply
        • Hi, Jessenia —

          Great pic! I can see what happened here… Somebody placed a greasy finger on this coin, and due to heat, the fingerprint was “captured” on the coin. This, however, would have been a post mint situation (since Mint employees where gloves when handling coins).

          I’d dare say this penny has an artsy element about it!

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
    • Hi, Noah —

      1977-D Lincoln cents are worth around 2 cents for their copper value, though bear in mind that melting these coins is presently illegal.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Rochelle —

      A worn 1968-D Lincoln cent has a collector value of just 1 cent, but the intrinsic value of the coin’s copper is worth closer to 2 cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • hi again josh, i recently found a 1968 d penny which is in very good shape . on the reverse it appears to have the E in e pluribus unum missing. actually you can see it but it is very faint

        Reply
        • Hello, Rhonda!

          Good to hear from you again! This is a very nicely preserved 1968-D Lincoln cent, though a little weakly struck it seems, explaining why the “E” in “E PLURIBUS UNUM” is a little anemic. You’ll notice the steps on the Lincoln Memorial are also a little softer than usual.

          This isn’t a scare piece or more valuable than others either, though the weakness in the appearance of certain details does make this coin stand out from the more well-struck specimens we usually see.

          Keep on checking your change!
          Josh

          Reply
    • Hello, Daniel —

      1983 doubled die Lincoln cents have doubling most prominently seen in the letters on the reverse of the coin.

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
  66. I have a 1976 penny that has Lincoln’s head struck in 3-d. It is raised on the front and, of course, indented on the back. Really neat. Value? Not a “wheatie.”

    Reply
  67. hi again josh, i recently found a 1968 d penny which is in very good
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a0e0eeb89d2a8b1c4ad80228b53723721db1c9e96783227678e45964fa5125c5.jpg shape . on the reverse it appears to have the E in e pluribus unum
    missing. actually you can see it but it is very faint. i have heard that
    this is a known error for the 1968 d penny. will you please have a look
    at the picture and let me know what you think? by the way, i thank you
    for being so patient with us newbies.
    thank you,

    rhonda

    Reply
  68. Hi, Rhonda!

    Please see my reply to this question on the other thread! If you can’t find it, in summary it appears this is a weakly struck piece, which is why the “E” (and also the steps of the Lincoln Memorial) appear softer than usual.

    Keep on looking for coin treasures!
    Josh

    Reply
  69. Hi!

    OK, these photos help volumes! What you have is an altered 1976 cent with a front-facing bust of somebody whom I can’t seem to identify through the photo; perhaps it’s a modified head of Lincoln, though I can’t tell tell for sure. Either way, the one-cent coin itself is Mint-made, but the alterations aren’t. These types of novelty coins sometimes sell for 50 cents to $1 or more, based on the design and interest in the particular piece.

    Cheers,
    Josh

    Reply
  70. Hey,
    I have several old coins that have came to me recently, and not one of them are whole. I’m still very new at this coin value thing. I’ve done a lot of research on them, leaving me with more questions than answers. With what I’ve read, some of them are cut, which means they are.. worthless?? But some of them could possibly be clipped? Others I believe the coin itself is/was valuable, with added mint errors that would increase the overall value, but again it’s either cut or clipped. If you could just tell me what you think, I’d greatly appreciate it.
    Thank you,

    Laura

    Reply
  71. Hi, Jenny —

    The missing “19” may be the result of a filled die, a type of mint error that is common yet eyepopping nonetheless. Should this be the situation with your coin (I think it may be), it could be worth $2 to $5, based on values for similar errors.

    Best,
    Josh

    Reply
  72. Hello Josh I am new to coin collection and I have several coins and last night I was going thru some coins and found a 1983 penny with a horse shoe branded on it can u please tell me if that is an error coin???? And I would like to know about a lot more thanks BevJ.

    Reply
    • Hi, Bev —

      I’d love to see a photo to tell you more about its specific origins, but based on your description, it sounds like one of many post-mint altered Lincoln cents that were branded and sold as “lucky pennies,” which are very popular novelty items. Such pieces tend to have a value of 25 to 50 cents among collectors of such novelty coins.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  73. hi josh, maybe you can enlighten me on this: i saw some nickels on ebay that have sold for over $100 each they are like 2013 thru 2015 and for the most part they all say PCGS-MS67FS. what the heck makes them so valuable? i am a newbe (as you know from our previous conversations) so this is probably a stupid question. but please indulge me as i am baffled. thank you very much,
    rhonda

    Reply
    • Hi, Rhonda —

      I don’t believe there are such things as “stupid questions”… And I’d still be glad to indulge nevertheless…

      The “PCGS” “MS-67” and “FS” designations are very important to understanding why these seemingly ordinary nickels are worth thousands of times face value.

      Most important are the MS-67″ and “FS” designations.

      MS-67 is a coin of superior mint-state quality. Not only is the coin uncirculated, it’s among the very best quality one can get — not THE best (that would be an MS-70 coin), but very few coins made for circulation ever grade better than MS-66 or so. The “FS” designation is an acronym for “Full Steps,” which refer to the tiny steps seen on the reverse (tail’s side) of the coin on Monticello. Relatively few Jefferson nickels ever have complete details, but this one does — as indicated by the fact that those minute steps were struck so well.

      What about the PCGS letters? They stand for the Professional Coin Grading Service, which is one of the most widely recognized, most respected coin authentication firms around (they put the coin in the plastic case that you probably saw encasing the nickel).

      Here’s more information on PCGS and other third-party coin grading companies: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

      Please feel free to ask any other coin questions you may have.

      Best!
      Josh

      Reply
  74. hi josh, i have a question about this 1972 D penny. i realize it is in terrible shape, but there is an anomaly on the reverse that i can’t figure out (see picture) is it just me or does it look like the columns have been re struck in this area. (i am just trying to train my eye as to what is important) thank you as always for your infinite patience.
    sincerely,
    rhonda

    Reply
    • Hello there, Rhonda!

      I It looks like this poor 1992-D Lincoln cent could tell some stories… The line you have highlighted is actually a deep (and fairly recent) scratch, which I can tell because it is exposing the lighter, brighter metal underneath the otherwise dark patina on the rest of the coin. Also of note? Do you see those white splotches on the Lincoln Memorial? And the splotchy discoloration? It appears this coin has been exposed to some caustic agents, eating away at the metal and even exposing some of the whitish zinc core.

      While this coin is certainly an eyepopper, unfortunately is due to post-mint damage. But keep on looking for anything that looks out of sort. You’re doing the right thing by hanging onto the odd-looking coins and you are sure to eventually find some mint errors and die varieties!

      Keep on checking back here whenever you want and posting your interesting finds!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  75. I have a 1967 quarter that appears to be a different metal than the usual 67 quarters? Makes no sense, I even (I know) filed a little into the planchet, the metal doesnt change like if someone plated it for fun

    Reply
  76. Hi Josh, my mother in law left us a five gallon water container full of pennies. I was wondering if you have ever seen a 1973 penny that has 1976 marked on the other side. Thank you

    Reply
  77. Hi, Jonathan —

    It looks like more than just a filled mintmark. There appears to be some type of cloudy substance or possibly a lamination issue of some sort on the obverse. A photo of the full coin would be helpful here.

    Thank you!
    Josh

    Reply
    • Hi, Quizie —

      If you have a 1984 doubled die Lincoln cent, it’s worth at least $100 to $150 in worn condition and $200 or more in uncirculated grades.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  78. Josh I have a question about a 1968 Lincoln penny that I found . Its copper but its the size of a Dime . I was wondering how much it could be worth . I saw some online that were worth $2,000.00 +

    Reply
  79. I posted some pictures I hope you got them . And if you could please tell me how much it is worth it’s a 1968 Lincoln penny dime size . I did’nt clean it because I’m afraid it will lose value.

    Reply
      • Hi, Rolando —

        It looks like somebody shaved down the Lincoln cent to make it the size of a dime. One can only speculate why (to unscrupulously fit it inside a roll of dimes?). At any rate, the coin is worth face value at best.

        Very interesting piece nevertheless!
        Josh

        Reply
    • Hi, Rolando —

      I suspect this penny was ground down to be inserted into a dime coin wrapper — saving the person who did that nine cents. Suspicions aside, your penny is worth two cents for its copper metal content.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Julie —

      Your 1968 cent Lincoln cent looks different due to extra wear, post mint damage, some apparent porosity, and discoloration. In other words, your cent has had quite a life! While the penny looks different from many others, it is still worth only its metal content, or about two cents.

      Thank you for your question and photos!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Julie —

      The rim is very worn, which caused it to merge with the lettering and other details near the edge of the obverse. This piece is still worth its metal content, or about two cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Animal Lover!

      Would you please post a photo of your coin? What year is it? The only regular-issue steel cents the United States made were struck during World War II in 1943 (a few rare errors were struck in 1944) and those are worth 10 to 30 cents each in worn condition.

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
  80. Hi this might be a silly question but where should I take my 1969s penny to be appraised or looked at. Im not an expert but I’m pretty sure I see doubling in it. And how much are they worth if so

    Reply
    • Hello, Kala!

      There’s no such thing as silly questions here! I’d love to check out your 1969-S Lincoln cent. If you wouldn’t mind uploading a photo of it that will look clear when enlarged I’ll take a look.

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
  81. Hi Josh, Remember the 1864 Indian Head Cent with “L” on the ribbon?.. Is it possible or did it happen already on a different year of the same type of coin? I ask because I found an actual letter “L” on the ribbon on one of my collection of Indian head cent Dated 1904 and I believed it was Uncirculated. I’ll include some photos and hopefully u can help me out on my discovery

    Reply
    • Hello, Dayan —

      The “L” initial for designer James B. Longacre was implemented in 1864 and remained on all Indian Head cents whenceforth. Your very nice, circulated 1904 Indian Head cent is worth $4 to $6.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  82. hello Joshua, I’m a little confused about why coins that were only minted for one year like the 1913 Buffalo nickel an this ( V ) nickel that have a low mintage , THE value is so much less for these year ,then most or even all in that series, it just seems with less of , would be worth more ! say these coins in a ( UC) grade equal the low grade the following year , ? And as always thank you ,,,#1

    Reply
  83. Hi, Josh. I was wondering if you know anything about a possible mint error on a penny where the year is stamped “196B” instead of what I’m assuming should be “1968.”

    Reply
    • Hello, Ashlee —

      Without seeing an image of your coin I can’t say for sure exactly what happened, but this sounds like a case of post-mint damage in which one side of the “8” was shoved into the rest of the digit. Your coin would still be worth about 2 cents for its copper bullion value. If you still want to submit a photo of the coin so I can check it out (in case it’s a die break or another type of mint die variety!) please feel free to submit it here in the forum.

      Thanks for your question!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Anthony!

      What a terrific circulation find! A well-worn 1888 Indian Head cent is worth about $2 to $3, but I think the story behind how you found the coin makes this a real trophy.

      Thanks for sharing your find with us!
      Josh

      Reply
  84. Hello my name is jessica I don’t know if I’m doing this right but Ihsve a friend who recently got me in to collecting Penny’s as well as other coins it’s funny because my regular store I go to every day has gotten so use to saving the old looking pwnnys so when I come in and buy my every day coffee they have me some Penny’s ready haja well the other day Sharon hands me my everyday 10 cents worth of Penny’s and the first thing I see is a 1969s IV never seen a S Before and I am not to key on the internet and just stumbled upon this sight and comments so I’m hoping maybe I will find a little help if u sir have the time u can reach me at mathis27jess1@gmail. Com that would be greatly appreciated simple because I may not ever find how I got hers again lol thanks and have a great holiday season

    Reply
    • Hello, Jessica —

      It is great to hear from you, and I appreciate your reaching out to us here at The Fun Times Guide to Coins. You are definitely doing a great job so far keeping your eyes peeled for scarce coins. The 1969-S Lincoln cent is scarcer than others, and you’re right — San Francisco pennies are generally scarcer than their Philadelphia and Denver siblings. Even still, the 1969-S Lincoln cent is a common coin and is worth 2 cents for its copper value.

      I encourage you to check out this link that discusses the 43 most valuable pennies, which include many you can find in pocket change: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/valuable-pennies/

      I am wishing you all the best in your coin collecting journey and hope to hear from you again.

      Good luck,
      Josh

      Reply
  85. JAHAIRA I was putting pennies into rolls to give to the bank but then I found a penny that was 1969’s and I never saw it before only I had the pennies that had the letter d

    Reply
    • Hi, Jahaira —

      The “S” mintmark on your 1969 cent indicates the coin was struck at the San Francisco Mint. Though relatively common in that 544,375,000 were mad, they are much tougher to come by these days because many folks have removed “S” mintmark coins from circulation because — just like you — they don’t find them as often as the “D” (Denver) coins. The value of your coin depends on its condition, but it’s safe to say that if it’s circulated, it’s worth about 2 cents for its copper value.

      I hope this info is helpful. Keep checking your change!

      Good luck,
      Josh

      Reply
  86. Hi,
    I am just wondering if these are errors or just some common stuff
    – the 1980 is a off center strike but the back is perfectly aligned
    – the 1985 D has some circles that look like a fingerprint
    – the 1960 D has a what looks like a scratch but it’s extra metal

    Just wondering if they worth something or are just common things.
    Thank you!

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/c29b679cf0c0b9011fca35f001e148507e0e3f98e60b4a5c11f307c422eb4a23.jpg
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a0a3ba68a61787dcbc8d1eaa2ee557b5e6b0e8887b89767f3308e8ee7000d2b6.jpg

    Reply
    • Hi, JustMe —

      The simple answer is, yes, these are regular coins. The 1980 penny is a few percent off-center, but that’s not enough to increase its value any. It is, however, worth two cents for its copper value, as all pre-1982 Lincoln Memorial cents are.

      As you stated, the 1985-D cent does have a fingerprint. This does not increase its value any and it’s worth face value.

      The 1960-D cent may raised metal, but that it looks like there was still some post-mint damage there and thus this circulated penny is worth its copper value (two cents) but no more.

      Thank you for your questions and photos!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Bravo —

      It’s hard to say for certain without seeing this coin in-hand, but it may have been exposed to a caustic agent and has corrosion. I also see possible evidence of it being struck by an aging die. Specks on the coin may also be gas bubbles from poor adhesion of the copper outer layer to the zinc core. Unfortunately this is something that would need a close exam in-hand and would need to be weighed to really ascertain.

      All my best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • I have a 1 dollar bill with a k7 and light brown maybe light orande bar on the right side it was made in 2009 anew York lots of similarities with a 100 dollar bill

        Reply
  87. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/989170db0a851669c8eab9829b7010ceeceec7a193ca4ce7b5577731f41d8079.jpg I have a 1959 D Penny that the word Liberty was not imprinted completely. Instead of “LIBERTY” the letter “L” is missing the bottom line so it looks like the letter “I, the letter “E” is missing the middle line so it looks like the letter “C” & the letter “T” is missing the top line on the right hand side so it looks more like the # “7.” Has anyone ever found this misprint? And if so, would it be of any value? My 9 & 10 year old boys are starting to get into coin collecting and both are very interested in finding out. My boys & I would greatly appreciate any help anyone can provide!!!

    Reply
    • Hello, Heidi!

      Misprints such as the one you see on your 1959-D Lincoln cent aren’t necessarily valuable, but they are nevertheless interesting to many collectors. There are even many coin collectors who focus on collecting only such errors and varieties. Your appears to be a grease-filled die error and these are normally not worth much more than 50 cents to perhaps $1. Do keep your eyes out for other anomalies, such as double strikes, repunched mintmarks, and the like. They’re pretty neat to look at and many are worth a pretty penny, too.

      I hope you and your sons have fun collecting coins, and please feel free to check back in whenever you have any questions or need any other coin-related assistance!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  88. My father sent me a picture of a penny he found. The penny has the Lincoln Memorial as it should be on one side, but it also has it stamped across Lincoln’s face on the other side. The penny is not in the best of shape so you cannot see a date on it or at least I cannot see one based on the picture I received. Is there any value to this penny if it was cleaned up some?

    Reply
    • Hello,

      I’d need to please see a photo of this coin if one can be kindly submitted to see if what your dad has is a coin that was counterstamped by a private mint or in fact is a type of valuable error.

      I look forward to hearing more about this coin!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • I was finally able to get a picture with much better quality than the original one. Now that I can see the picture clearly it appears the coin has been manipulated. While the imprint is over Lincoln’s face, all of the lettering is a mirror image. It also appears the dark spot is a separate layer underneath exposing the letters “UST” which is part of “IN GOD WE TRUST.”

        https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f962db24e3b6d4950ef73214d96a07ffccf6e3ebfd1cf3b335fc549bf54cb281.jpg

        Reply
        • Hi, SB —

          It appears the lettering and Lincoln Memorial are imprinted and incuse, no? The lettering is going into the surface, correct? If so, then I believe this coin had been hammered by somebody outside the Mint who placed another Lincoln cent, reverse (tail’s side) down on top of this one. You might still hang onto this anyway just in case somebody can examine the coin in-hand and suggest otherwise, but based on the photos this looks like a post-Mint alteration.

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
  89. I have a penny from the 1970’s, I presume as it has 197 as the date, all other lettering and stamping is fully pronounced on this penny, it appears to just be missing that end year number on the date stamp…my question is is it worth anything? I can’t take a photo currently as my cell phone is bricked up. But soon as I can I will post for anyone who may have information…I can find nothing on this type of error stamp on any of the sites. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Hi, CS —

      Without seeing the coin it is hard to say for certain what is going on, but it could be either a grease-filled die error, a weak strike, or even post-Mint damage. I look forward to assisting you further…

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Heidi —

      There are a variety of possible reasons why the rim would be raised and the coin’s diameter smaller. However, my first thought is that this is a so-called “dryer” coin, squeezed by centrifugal force within a clothes drier or another type of machine, rolling the rim inward unto the coin.

      Would you please post a photo of your 1991-D Lincoln cent so I can help determine what may have happened to your coin?

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Nice find, Spade!

      Assuming it’s in well-circulated condition as is typical for coins of that age, it’s worth between $2 and $3.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, David —

      What you describe is a normal part of the inscription on Lincoln Memorial cents and does not, in and of itself, add any additional value.

      Thank you for your post!
      Josh

      Reply
  90. I have a 1980 Lincoln penny that has the Liberty Bell stamped next to Lincoln’s face (touching his nose). I’ve seen pennies with the Liberty Bell to his left and a stamp of the U.S. on his right, but can’t find information on the one I have. Anyone?

    Reply
    • Hi, Lori —

      You have an example of a very popular series of novelty pennies — real pennies that were counterstamped with the Liberty Bell design. These are generally worth 50 cents to $1 each in the novelty coin market.

      Cool find!
      Josh

      Reply
  91. I have a 1975 penny and it has the liberty bell to the left of his face and to the right it has the out line of the USA and it said USA in it does it have any value?

    Reply
    • Hi, Nicholas —

      While your coin is technically altered, it’s a collectible that was once sold by a private company as a patriotic novelty coin. These usually sell for in the range of 50 cents to $1 each.

      Neat find!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Deborah —

      This is actually a post-Mint counterstamp — somebody stamped the “R” on the coin after it was minted. While this is technically an alteration, sometimes such pieces are worth more as novelty collectibles. This probably served as a merchant’s coupon or token and could be worth about 50 cents to $1 to a collector of such novelties. It would likely be worth more if we knew who — or what organization — put the stamp there.

      Cool find!
      Josh

      Reply
  92. Hello. I have a 1974 D with a Cross on it.. I can not find any info for this coin. Perhaps you could tell me what I have. It is in a cardboard sleeve and looks pretty good. Thank you, Matt

    Reply

Leave a Comment