Do You Have The Rare 1983 Dime Worth More Than $5,000? Here’s What To Look For!



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Did you know some 1983 Roosevelt dimes are worth more than $5,000?

How to spot the rare and valuable error on 1983 dimes.
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Yep, the 1983 dime error is one of the most sought-after rare United States error coins struck in the 1980s — and it has kept collectors on their toes for years!

Here’s what you should be looking for on your 1983 Roosevelt dimes to determine if you have this valuable dime error or not…

What To Look For

OK, so what should you be on the lookout for when examining your 1983 dimes?

Actually, it’s not what you will see on this particular error coin that makes it valuable, but rather what you won’t see!

The rare error is the 1983 no-S proof dime. (It’s a 1983 proof dime with no mintmark at all.)

No “S”?

That “S” is the mintmark for the San Francisco Mint — which has struck proof dimes on a regular basis since 1968.

Virtually all 1983 proof dimes carry the “S” mintmark. But some were accidentally made by dies that weren’t stamped with the “S” mintmark. (The “S” mintmark on proof Roosevelt dimes is usually found just above the date under the back of Franklin Roosevelt’s neck.)

Since all Roosevelt dimes made for circulation are supposed to carry a “P” mintmark for the Philadelphia Mint or a “D” denoting the Denver Mint, a 1983 dime with no mintmark should stand out — but you’ve got to look for it.

Keep in mind, this isn’t a coin you’d likely find in pocket change.

Sure, in theory it’s possible that someone could have cracked a 1983 no-S dime from a proof set and spent it. Actually, a lot of proof coins wind up in circulation. But given the rarity of this coin to begin with, those are some pretty long odds that one would turn up in the change you get back from a vending machine or at the store!

So, your best bet in finding this dime error is to search 1983 proof sets. (Many, many 1983 proof sets!) That’s actually how a lot of collectors end up finding rare errors and varieties — by searching through proof sets for error coins and other oddities that were overlooked by other collectors.

 

How Rare Is This 1983 Dime Error?

The U.S. Mint is not known for making many mistakes. This is especially so with proof coins — coins that are supposed to represent the finest in minting technology and quality.

Of course, collectors don’t mind when the mint messes something up on proof coins (or any coins for that matter), because error coins and error varieties are highly scarce and valued!

The 1983 no-S dime is among a group of rare coins accidentally released by the mint without a mintmark.

In fact, the 1983 dime without a mintmark is the last of a run of dimes from the period that were somehow produced without their appropriate mintmark.

The others include:

As for how many of the 1983 proof dimes were struck without the “S” mintmark? That’s unclear. Estimates suggest the number could be around 3,000 — which is the approximate number of proof dimes that would be struck by a single die at the time.

But even if 3,000 were made, that really isn’t that many. The 1983 no-mintmark proof dime is indeed a rare coin. One worth a lot of money.

So… how much is it worth?

Error 1983 No-S Dime Value

Find a 1983 proof dime error with no mintmark?

Take good care of it — because it’s worth anywhere from $500 to $5,000 (or more)!

A 1983 dime’s value depends on the condition of the coin. The better the grade, the more it’s worth. And in this case, you’re looking at serious dough for one in top condition.

The record price for a 1983 no-S Roosevelt dime? In 2016, someone paid $20,489.70 for an example graded by Professional Coin Grading Service as a Proof-70 with deep cameo frosting.

Non-Error 1983 Dime Value

OK, so what if all you have is a regular dime from 1983 with a “P,” “D,” or “S” mintmark?

Most 1983 dimes include the mintmark — so it’s important to list the value of those pieces, too.

Here’s a rundown on values:

  • 1983-P dime — A total of 647,025,000 dimes were minted at the Philadelphia Mint (“P”) in 1983. So these are extremely common coins. And, since they don’t contain any precious metal, they are worth face value if worn. However, uncirculated examples are collectible and worth 30 cents and up.
  • 1983-D dime — Like its Philly counterpart, the 1983-D dime from the Denver Mint (“D”) is also quite common, with a mintage of 730,129,224. Circulated pieces like the ones you’ll find in your spare change are worth face value. But pieces that were never spent as money and contain no wear are worth 30 cents or more each.
  • 1983-S dime — While the no-S proof error coin is quite valuable, normal 1983-S proof Roosevelt dimes are pretty common. A total of 3,279,126 were minted, and they’re worth $1.50 or more.

*Values listed above are for coins in average condition. If you find pieces in exceptional condition, they’re worth even more! Coins that are cleaned, have holes, heavy nicks and scratches, or show other signs of damage are generally worth less.

1983 Dime Value
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RELATED: Here’s a list of the most valuable dimes that you can find in pocket change!

Joshua

I'm the Coin Editor here at TheFunTimesGuide. My love for coins began when I was 11 years old. I primarily collect and study U.S. coins produced during the 20th century. I'm a member of the American Numismatic Association (ANA) and the Numismatic Literary Guild (NLG) and have won multiple awards from the NLG for my work as a coin journalist. I'm also the editor at the Florida United Numismatists Club (FUN Topics magazine), and author of Images of America: The United States Mint in Philadelphia (a book that explores the colorful history of the Philadelphia Mint). I've contributed hundreds of articles for various coin publications including COINage, The Numismatist, Numismatic News, Coin Dealer Newsletter, Coin Values, and CoinWeek. I've authored nearly 1,000 articles here at The Fun Times Guide to Coins (many of them with over 50K shares), and I welcome your coin questions in the comments below!

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