Collecting Roosevelt Dimes: Values & Key Dates

roosevelt-dimes-photo-by-joshua.JPG Collecting Roosevelt dimes can be both fun and challenging. After all, while Roosevelt dimes flood our pocket change, it can be a bit costly for some to buy and assemble a collection of the silver Roosevelt dimes.

Roosevelt dimes were first made in 1946.

In 1965, the United States Mint began striking copper-nickel clad Roosevelt dimes.

While many Roosevelt dimes can be had for face value or a nominal premium over silver bullion value, there are some Roosevelt dimes that are worth tens, even hundreds, of dollars.

 

Roosevelt Dimes: Fun & Challenging To Collect

Upon first thought, you may not think there’s much to get excited about with Roosevelt dimes. After all, there have been…

  • No design changes on the Roosevelt dime… ever
  • No major regular-strike rarities
  • No big time news stories about Roosevelt dimes

…And then you realize that Roosevelt dimes

  • Are 90% silver from 1946 to 1964 and for certain proofs since 1992
  • Are mostly inexpensive and easy to collect
  • Include a couple rare errors
  • Once bore a ‘W’ (West Point New York) mint mark

Roosevelt Dime Key Dates & Interesting Tidbits

So, you still think Roosevelt dimes are boring? I didn’t think so! Let’s look at some of the key dates, rarities, and other interesting things you’ll find in the Roosevelt dime series.

The Roosevelt dime regular-strike ‘key’ dates and their values in uncirculated grades are:

  • 1949-S ($5 to $8)
  • 1955 ($5 to $8)
  • 1955-D ($5 to $8)
  • 1955-S ($5 to $8)
  • 1996-W — released only in mint sets ($15 to $20)

There are also a score of unintended rarities in the Roosevelt dime series; all estimated values are for coins in either uncirculated or proof:

  • 1960 doubled-die obverse — proof ($200 to $300)
  • 1963 doubled-die reverse — proof ($200 to $300)
  • 1964-D doubled-die reverse ($100)
  • 1968 no-S — proof ($14,000 to $18,000)
  • 1970 no-S — proof ($800 to $1,000)
  • 1982 no-mint mark ($250 to $500)
  • 1983 no-S — proof ($800 to $900)

Roosevelt Dime Values

Unless you Roosevelt dime is one of those listed above, you can generally expect your piece won’t be worth very much money.

Even silver Roosevelt dimes aren’t worth much more than their silver bullion value — even if uncirculated.

Here’s a look at average values for most Roosevelt dimes not listed above:

  • Worn silver Roosevelt dimes from 1946 to 1964 ($1 to $2)
  • Uncirculated silver Roosevelt dimes from 1946 to 1964 ($2 to $3)
  • Worn copper-nickel clad Roosevelt dimes 1965 to present (10 cents)
  • Uncirculated copper-nickel clad Roosevelt dimes 1965 to present (20 cents to 50 cents)

Joshua McMorrow-Hernandez

My love for coins and numismatics began when I was 11 years old. I primarily collect and study U.S. coins produced during the 20th century. I've also been studying meteorology and watching weather patterns for years. I enjoy sharing little-known facts and fun stuff about coins, weather, travel, health, and living green with others.

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Fun From Around the Web

  • Doctordevice

    Can you go to the Philadelphia Mint and buy coins directly from them at face value. Thanks

    • Anonymous

      Doctor,

      As it went years ago, you could order coins directly from the mints and simply pay extra for shipping. While most coins offered for sale by the mint do come with a markup, there is a program called the Direct Ship program for dollar coin — you can find out more about it with this link: http://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/2010/04/direct_ship.php

      Otherwise, the best way to get freshly minted coins for face value is to order bag or roll quantities from banks which receive shipments from the government.

      • Richard

        Hi,
        I have a 1975 dime no mint mark. Can you please tell me what to look for. I see its worth 500m but doubt mine is. Can you assist

  • Don

    I have some roosevelt dimes I. Would like to get more information on if you can help great if not its ok thank you very much for you’re time…. the coins are as followed ” I belive”

    1968 no mint mark 

    1975 no mint mark 

    How do I tell if these coins are “S” and just missing the mint mark as I can see online they are rare and I got this coins in a collection along with some silver coin please let me know thanks

  • Greedyreedy13

    I just found a penny that has no head side to it. Both sides are stamped identical tail sides, you know it looks like a building. There is no year because that’s on the front. Is this worth anything?

    • Anonymous

      Greedy,

      Sounds like you have a novelty coin that was minted most likely for a magician. Such pieces have no collector value.

  • JoshuaTheFunTimesGuide

    Rich,

    Up through the late 1980s, mintmarks were hand-applied to the hubs that created the dies (the latter being the device that imprints images on coins), thus explaining the variances in mintmark/letter placement.

  • giomilan

    Roosevelt dime 1970-D without ‘U’

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1296836263 Eric Degrave

    well I see this post is old, however, I hope someone can help me. I have a few circulated coins and was hoping to find their actual value and where I might be able to sell them.

  • Kyle

    I have couple of 1968 and 1982, 83 dime with no mint mark,are they worth anything

    • JoshuaTheFunTimesGuide

      Hi, Kyle -

      May we see pictures of the 1982 and 1983 dimes without mint marks? Those could be worth $100 each or more because they should have either a “P” or “D” mintmark on them.

  • Kyle

    I have here a 1968 and a 1970 dime with no mint, are they worth a lil bit or just the face value

    • JoshuaTheFunTimesGuide

      Hi, Kyle -

      You’re right; they are worth face value, unless they are in uncirculated (in mint condition), in which case they would be worth around 30 cents each.

  • Paul

    I’ve got a couple 1968 dimes with no mint mark. Are they valuable??

    Thanks,
    Paul

    • JoshuaTheFunTimesGuide

      Hi, Paul -

      They are worth face value if they show any signs of wear.

      Thanks for your question!

  • Holly

    Hi! Found this old dime.. cant figure out the date? Can you give us any info about it?

    • JoshuaTheFunTimesGuide

      Hi, Holly -

      Well, I can narrow the date of this coin to 1980 or later, given that I see a “P” mintmark above the date, and the Philadelphia mint did not strike dimes with a mintmark until 1980. In fact, this appears to be a 1981-P Roosevelt dime because the third digit of the date looks to have a complete loop at both its top and bottom, and the font style and height would appear to fit the “8″ from that year.

      As for what happened to your coin, it is highly plausible that it met some very caustic chemicals, most likely acid. Note to the world, acid and coins do not mix!

  • SMPICPC Buses

    Hi, I just sold a 1946 s Roosevelt dime in a LOT on eBay. This dime has what I would term a “strike error” though not sure WHAT would cause this (circle struck at center of face side). Have you ever seen this before -and do you know what caused it?

    The entire eBay LOT, plus close-up PHOTO of this DIME can be seen at eBay SEARCH: item # “13090501794″. it Sold today – so that item # is still searchable for a few weeks at least.

    I’m a complete novice at coins, so probably let a few goodies go in this $225 batch that sold w/in 3 minutes and 1 second of launch.

    I researched some, but not as much as I’d have liked to have had time for.

    Most coins were poor/good to very good with a few better. Somewhere in there I let something valuable get by -remember: 3 minutes and 1 second from being born, this got snagged.

    Any thoughts on that 1946 Roosevelt dime, at least, would be very appreciated.
    THANKS!
    ~jeff

    • JoshuaTheFunTimesGuide

      Hello,

      Hmm… Tried using both the basic and the advanced search for the number (which I copied and pasted to ensure it is exactly as you list here) and unfortunately can’t find the lot on eBay.

      Without seeing the image, it is hard to say what, exactly, would have caused a circle. Firstly, is he circle raised or sunken into the design? It could be anything from a type of error called a “strike through,” in which a piece if debris impeded the striking of your coin. Or, it could even be post mint damage. If you can post any photos of the 1946 Roosevelt dime, I’d be glad to take a look and make a further determination!