Have A 2005 Oregon Quarter? It Could Be Worth $25 Or More! A List Of Oregon State Quarter Errors To Look For + An Oregon Quarter Price Guide



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Have an Oregon state quarter with an error and want to know what it’s worth? You’ve come to the right place…

Oregon quarter errors are worth much more than face value and are highly collectible!

What’s cool, too, is that many Oregon error quarters are pretty scarce and valuable — yet you can find them in pocket change or bank rolls if you look hard enough and have some luck on your side.

 

How Many Oregon Quarters Were Made?

Oregon quarters were released in 2005 as part of the 50 State Quarters program.

NOTE: Production of the 50 State Quarters spanned from 1999 through 2008. It was one of the most popular circulating coin initiatives ever undertaken by the United States Mint.

Circulation-strike Oregon quarters were made at the Philadelphia (“P” mintmark) and Denver (“D” mintmark) Mints. Proof versions for coin collectors were produced at the San Francisco Mint (“S” mintmark).

In total, more than 725 million Oregon quarters were made:

  • 316,200,000 were struck at the Philadelphia Mint
  • 404,000,000 were struck at the Denver Mint
  • Nearly 5 million were struck at the San Francisco Mint (3,262,960 copper-nickel clad proofs and 1,678,649 90% silver proofs)

 

How Many Oregon State Quarters With Errors Exist?

Now that you have some idea as to how many millions of Oregon state quarters were minted, you’ll have a better appreciation for how scarce Oregon quarter errors are.

It’s pretty difficult for error coins to escape the United States Mint — with all of the quality-control screenings a coin must endure before making it out into circulation. Many coins are struck with errors, but relatively few ever pass by the careful eyes of US Mint officials.

Sometimes, US Mint employees catch an error only after a batch of mis-struck coins have already been distributed into circulation. This is how many error coins end up in everyday pocket change.

Nobody really knows for sure how many Oregon state quarter errors were minted. But even if a few million exist with some type of minor or major error or variety, that’s still only a fraction of all the Oregon quarters made!

 

The Value Of Oregon State Quarters With Broadstrike Errors

Among the most popular Oregon quarter errors is one containing a so-called broadstrike.

A broadstrike error occurs when a coin is struck without its retaining collar (a device that helps form the edge of the coin and prevents it from being struck flatter or wider than it should be).

Broadstrike coins don’t have their proper edge. They will also be noticeably larger and flatter than a typical example of its denomination  — because the metal spread out too far during the coin’s striking.

Depending on the size and magnitude of the error, an Oregon broadstrike quarter may be worth $25 to $200+.

 

The Value Of Other Oregon Quarter Errors

There are several more types of Oregon state quarter errors worth looking for:

  • Off-center Oregon state quarter — Values range from $5 to $50+, depending on how off-center the strike is.
  • Oregon quarter with die cracks — Generally worth $3 to $10, based on how severe the die crack is and its location.
  • Doubled die Oregon state quarter — Though doubled die Oregon quarters are relatively scarce, there isn’t as much demand for minor doubled die errors. They generally vary in value from $5 to $20.

There are still other types of Oregon quarter errors. However, the ones listed above are among the most commonly encountered types of 50 State Quarter error coins.

The values for other types of errors and varieties will range wildly depending on various factors:

  • How drastic the error or variety is
  • Its location on the coin
  • The condition of the coin
  • Overall demand for the error

NOTE: Just because an error is rare or unusual doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s valuable. There are several things that must occur in order for your error coin to be valuable. Furthermore, there must be steady demand for the error — but not enough pieces to meet that demand — for it to become super valuable.

Regardless of its value… if you find a cool error coin, the best thing to do is keep it. You may never again find another like it!

 

Oregon Quarter Facts & Trivia

Impress your friends and become a more knowledgeable coin collector with these fun Oregon state quarter facts:

  • The Oregon quarter is the 33rd coin in the 50 State Quarters series. Honoring the 33rd state to join the union, the Oregon quarter pays homage to the “The Beaver State” — which became part of the United States in 1859.
  • The Oregon state quarter was released on June 6, 2005. The obverse (“heads” side) of the coin features a bust of George Washington designed in 1932 by John Flanagan and modified in 1999 by William Cousins. The reverse (“tails” side) of the coin was designed by United States Mint Artistic Infusion Program artist Donna Weaver.
  • The Oregon quarter features Crater Lake, which was formed about 7,700 years ago after a volcanic eruption formed a caldera that became the nation’s deepest lake. Crater Lake boasts clear blue waters and is located in Crater Lake National Park.

 

Other State Quarter Errors

In addition to Oregon state quarter errors mentioned above, here are some of our other articles about state quarters with errors:

Joshua

I'm the Coin Editor here at TheFunTimesGuide. My love for coins began when I was 11 years old. I primarily collect and study U.S. coins produced during the 20th century. I'm a member of the American Numismatic Association (ANA) and the Numismatic Literary Guild (NLG) and have won multiple awards from the NLG for my work as a coin journalist. I'm also the editor at the Florida United Numismatists Club (FUN Topics magazine), and author of Images of America: The United States Mint in Philadelphia (a book that explores the colorful history of the Philadelphia Mint). I've contributed hundreds of articles for various coin publications including COINage, The Numismatist, Numismatic News, Coin Dealer Newsletter, Coin Values, and CoinWeek. I've authored nearly 1,000 articles here at The Fun Times Guide to Coins (many of them with over 50K shares), and I welcome your coin questions in the comments below!

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