New Hampshire Quarter Value + Little-Known Facts About The New Hampshire State Quarter And New Hampshire Quarter Errors


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In 2000, the United States Mint released the 9th quarter in the popular 50 State Quarters program.

The 2000 New Hampshire state quarter was loved by millions when it was first released because of its beautiful depiction of a famous set of natural rock ledges dubbed “The Old Man of the Mountain.”

Sadly, 3 years later, the New Hampshire quarter unofficially earned the status of memorializing the famed natural edifice, for time caught up with the “Old Man.” In 2003, the beloved rock face collapsed.

 

New Hampshire Quarter Errors

You may be wondering if there are any special New Hampshire state quarter errors worth mentioning.

According to some coin website forums (My Coin Collecting and Collectors Corner), there are people who have come across New Hampshire state quarters appearing without a mint mark in their change.

The only indication as to the value of these coins right now comes from perusing several different coin dealers’ offerings, which currently list the 2000 no-mint mark New Hampshire quarter for between $5 and $40.

Prices are based on wear. While this coin does not seem very valuable right now, it certainly does make for an interesting find that may someday be recognized as a rare and expensive error coin.

Here’s a list of typical mint errors that you are likely to find on New Hampshire quarters.

 

What About The Old Man Of The Mountain?

The Old Man of the Mountain is thought to have existed for thousands of years, but it was first noted in 1805.

The Old Man of the Mountain was formed by 5 granite ledges that were perched off the side of a mountain in Franconia Notch State Park. When seen at certain angles, the 5 ledges formed a perfect profile of a face with a distinct chin, nose, and forehead.

The profile itself measured 40 feet high by 25 feet wide, but the Old Man rose high above the ground. In fact, the Old Man of the Mountain steadfastly looked out over the Granite State from a height of around of 1,200 feet.

The Old Man was a tourist attraction that drew thousands to the site, and it was a famous symbol for the state of New Hampshire.

By all accounts, in May 2003, the Old Man simply suffered one storm too many before the 5 famous ledges fell off the side of the mountain. It was a sad day in New Hampshire when the news broke that the Old Man no longer existed, but for in the minds and hearts of the many who loved the natural sculpture.

There are efforts underway to build a memorial to the Old Man of the Mountain.

 

New Hampshire Quarter Values

If you find any New Hampshire state quarters in your change, then they will be circulated. Circulated New Hampshire state quarters are worth only face value.

But, if you do happen to find uncirculated New Hampshire state quarters, such as the gleaming coins often found in mint-fresh rolls that many banks have, the coin will be worth somewhere between 30 and 50 cents.

Copper-nickel proof versions of the New Hampshire state quarter are worth around $3 to $5, and silver proof versions are usually priced between $5 and $7.

 

How Was the Design Selected For The New Hampshire Quarter?

New Hampshire’s governor, Jeanne Shaheen, established a Commemorative Quarter Committee.

The committee’s job was to facilitate a design competition open to all the state’s residents.

A website designated to informing people about the design process was launched.

Upon the selection of a final design, the concept was sent to and approved by the Secretary of Treasury.

The coin was engraved by William C. Cousins.

19 thoughts on “New Hampshire Quarter Value + Little-Known Facts About The New Hampshire State Quarter And New Hampshire Quarter Errors”

  1. I do not have a camera that will allow me to take a picture up close.  I even tried magnifying it to get a larger pic but that did not work either.
    Sorry

    Reply
  2. This is the best picture I can get of the New Hampshire Quarter that is missing the “New”  Does this help you?

    Reply
    • Hi, Mccormackk

      Thank you for the great pics. From what I can tell, it looks like a filled die may have been the cause of the missing “NEW.” Such pieces may be worth a few dollars to collectors of such common but interesting oddities.

      Reply
  3. I found an interesting  New Hampshire state quarter this morning. It must have gone through the ringer judging by the looks of it. Let me know what you think. The color is not that great due to the LED lights on my digital microscope but you get the picture.

    Reply
  4. I have a New Hampshire state quarter that is magnetic. I mean that a magnet will attract the quarter, not that the quarter will attract another piece of non-magnetized metal. I know that magician’s coins can be gimmicked with a small magnet, but that’s not the case here. Could this coin be something special? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hello, Al —

      Without inspecting the coin in-hand it’s hard to say for certain. Certainly it’s possible that your coin is in fact a steel core quarter, which is a magicians coin that’s sold online for about $15.

      One way to determine what may be up with your coin is to weigh it. A copper-nickel clad quarter would weigh 5.67 grams.

      If your coin is machined in which the copper core is removed and replaced with steel, it would weigh less than a copper-nickel coin ordinarily would weigh.

      Reply
    • Hello, Al —

      Without inspecting the coin in-hand it’s hard to say for certain. Certainly it’s possible that your coin is in fact a steel core quarter, which is a magicians coin that’s sold online for about $15.

      One way to determine what may be up with your coin is to weigh it. A copper-nickel clad quarter would weigh 5.67 grams.

      If your coin is machined in which the copper core is removed and replaced with steel, it would weigh less than a copper-nickel coin ordinarily would.

      Reply
      • Thanks for your response. But check this out. I have since found 2 more magnetic quarters, although these are not AS magnetic as the first one I found. If you look at the edge of the quarters, they look like they are silver coins, as in, you don’t see the copper/nickel separation. Most quarters are not at all magnetic but these 3 are. I don’t have a scale to weigh them, but I will try to find someplace that can weigh them for me and I’ll let you know what the results are.

        Reply
        • Hello, Al —

          Without seeing images of the coins it’s hard to say for certain, but they sound like they could be illusionist’s “gaffe” coins, which are ordinary coins that are hollowed out and filled with steel so they can indeed be magnetic. Again though, this is a theory based only on the description of your coins in the comment.

          If you can provide images please feel free to share them!

          Thank you!
          Josh @ TheFunTimesGuide

          Reply
  5. My son found this New Hampshire quarter in the Coin Star. I has smooth, raised edges and is much thicker than a normal quarter. Anything special about it?

    Reply
    • Hi, Michele —

      From these two images, I don’t seem to see much out of the ordinary with the coin, except for some rim bruises. I’d be curious how thick this quarter measures and also how much it weighs, as that could answer the question. Normally, a quarter is 5.670 grams in weight and is 1.75 millimeters in thickness.

      Is it possible that you could please provide a comparison photo of the edge of this quarter next to another quarter that seems to be of “regular” thickness?

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
  6. I just came across a New Hampshire quarter that is missing the nickle plating on the “state side” of the coin. I work in retail and this coin landed in my register. I bought it only knowing it was different. I found one guy “trying” to sell one on Ebay for $250. Is he way off base or is my $0.25 investment worth anything near that value?

    Reply
    • Hi, Phil –

      This is a neat-looking coin, but it would have to be inspected in-hand for several reasons:

      *It would need to be weighed and should theoretically weigh less than the 5.67 grams a “normal” clad quarter would weigh
      *A metallurgic test would help determine if the state side was plated or the nickel coating was chemically removed
      *There would need to be an inspection of the coin from its edge to see if there is any other evidence of tampering.

      For an in-hand inspection, you could either have the coin evaluated by a third-party coin grading company or a local coin dealer.

      Here’s more info on third-party coin grading firms: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/
      And here’s info on finding a good coin dealer: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/coin_dealer/
      This link takes you to a searchable database of coin dealers affiliated with the Professional Numismatists Guild: https://png.memberclicks.net/find-a-png-dealer

      At any rate, it was wise to hold this coin aside, and I hope it checks out as an error.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  7. I found a 2013 New Hampshire “White Mountain” Quarter which has no ridges and no mint mark is visible https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/06d49a8b438dfbc755b37b010dec454ac3615bb25daafcac768b424663e4f30a.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/7abc750ce71bb841fdb8a4043b0f152d12cb2176222a16ae47a7fe9f085e00d7.jpg . The obverse and the reverse are both smooth. It also has a line through the E and the M in White Mountain. Has this coin been altered or is it a rare coin? I have images.

    Reply
    • Hi, Renzie —

      Your quarter exhibits heavy wear with apparent signs of edge planing, which is a form of post-mint damage. This piece is worth face value and is safe to spend.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply

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