Got Wheaties? A List Of The Most Valuable Wheat Pennies (Including 1909 Wheat Cent Values)

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Bud wrote:

I have several hundred wheat pennies, with dates in the 50’s, 40’s, 30’s, 20’s, and I have a 1909. The 1909 does not have the initials on the back. Could you tell me if it is worth anything, and what would the collective value of the wheat pennies be? Thank you.

A bunch of readers want to know the values of their wheat back pennies — which collectors call “wheaties”.

So here is the rundown on wheat penny values…

 

The Value Of Wheat Pennies

1930’s wheaties and earlier are worth 10 cents to 30 cents, depending on the grade.

Almost all of the 1940’s and 50’s wheat pennies are worth 4 cents to 10 cents, depending on the grade of the coins.

Here are the exceptions to the above wheat penny prices:

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1955 Double Die — Some of the 1955 wheat cents were struck from improperly prepared dies that show a fully doubled outline of the 1955 date. The 1955 double die has a value of about $1,200.

Here’s more about the 1955 double die penny.

1931 S — Due to very low mintage, this coin has a value of around $75.

1924 D — Low mintage makes this one worth $20.

1922 — There are 3 varieties, which I have explained in this article.

1914 D — Over a million were minted, but it still has a value around $200.

 

Now we come to a whole new section, the 1909 wheat cent and what you should look for…


The Value Of 1909 Wheat Pennies

1909 was the first year that wheat cents were issued.

The designer of this penny was Victor D. Brenner.

When the 1909 coins were first struck, they had Brenner’s initials on the reverse — these are known as VDB cents.

However, his initials were removed mid-way through production and not reinstated again until 1918 when they were switched to the front (instead of the reverse) side of the coin.

So we ended up with:

  • 1909 VDB’s
  • 1909 S VDB’s
  • 1909’s without VDB
  • 1909 S’s without VDB

There were a lot fewer of these coins minted at the San Francisco mint — which makes the S’s worth quite a bit more.

Here are the values of 1909 wheat pennies:

  • 1909 with no VDB — worth about $2.
  • 1909 S with no VDB — worth about $80.
  • 1909 VDB — worth about $10.
  • 1909 S VDB — known as “The King of the Wheaties,” it’s one of the most sought-after cents of any collector. There were less than 490,000 of them minted, and the value ranges from $650 to $2,200 depending on the grade.

Wondering where to look for the VDB mark?

You will find the VDB letters on the back side of the coin — at the very bottom — near the rim.

The VDB was printed very small and coins become worn over the years, so if you have a 1909 wheat cent, you might want to look closer with a magnifying glass.

Here is a picture of the 1909 S VDB cent. Can you see the VDB initials at the bottom near the rim?

 

Other Wheat Penny Values

There are a few other wheat pennies that have a value of more than just a few cents — they are:

1933 D – $2.00

1932 – $1.50

1931 D – $3.00

1926 S – $2.25

1923 S – $2.00

1916 S – $1.20

1915 S – $7.00

1915 D – $1.75

1915 – $1.60

1914 S – $12.00

1913 S – $7.00

1913 D – $2.50

1912 S – $12.00

1912 D – $6.00

1912 – $1.25

1911 S – $18.00

1911 D – $5.00

1910 S – $8.00

NOTE: The average buying price for any wheat pennies (other than the ones I have listed in this article) is about 4 cents each.

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350 thoughts on “Got Wheaties? A List Of The Most Valuable Wheat Pennies (Including 1909 Wheat Cent Values)”

  1. There was no etched, stuck, or inscribed that letter into the coin. I’ve been studies very carefully on this coin. I can see that letter look so prefect sharp and very original. I never seen anything like that before. Because I know so much about the old coins like wheat penny for many years. That why I’ve been kept this for over ten years. I’ve been tried to the coin collections and they doesn’t know anything about this. They never seen like that before. That why, I am looking for an answer out there somewhere.

    Reply
    • Hi Jerry,

      Hmm… Well, unfortunately I haven’t seen or heard of such a coin, either. There are many, many people who are metal workers at heart and they inscribe these things onto coins just for the sport of it.

      Now, there are cases where certain letters in the phrases (like E PLURIBUS UNUM) may be messed up and look like other letters, but the b or q mark is something I can’t make sense of at all. If the b or q is just sitting by itself in the middle of open space, then it is 99.99% likely that a person simply inscribed or stamped this upon their own whim.

      If the b or q is mixed up in the lettering that’s supposed to be on the coin, then perhaps there is some type of mint error going on. But, again, I seriously doubt that’s the case given the descriptions you’re giving me about your coin.

      I wish you all the best…

      Reply
      • I have a large quantity of circulated wheat back pennies, mostly from the 40’s and 50’s but also some from the 10’s, 20’s and 30’s.  Probably about 75 pounds total weight.  Can you give me some advice on how to sell this hoard.  Thanks,  Allen 

        Reply
    • Actually, 1909-S VDB Lincoln cents are worth at least $600 to $800 and MORE if they are problem-free (have not been cleaned, bent, corroded, etc.) and in grades of good (very well worn) or higher. In fact, it’s not uncommon for gem uncirculated specimens to bring in $2,500 to $5,000.

      Reply
    • Hi, T. –

      What you have sounds like a standard 1941 Lincoln wheat cent that, in circulated grades, is worth between 2 cents and 5 cents.

      Reply
    • Loretta,

      Congrats on the find! If it isn’t graded and authenticated, I would do that first. Why? Because, frankly, nobody is going to bid on or buy such an expensive coin unless it has been authenticated by a major third-party coin grading company like PCGS or NGC.

      Once you have overcome that hurdle — or if you already have — I would approach auction houses. Teletrade is a major phone and online auction house, Heritage, Bowers & Merena, and Stack’s are three other well-respected numismatic auction companies which routinely handle expensive and rare coins.

      Good luck!

      Reply
    • Hi, Dennis —

      What you have is a regular 1952 Lincoln cent (worth around 2 to 3 cents) that somebody altered when that person stamped the star on the back.

      The lack of a mint mark on your coin means it was made at the Philadelphia mint. Even to this day, Philadelphia-mint Lincoln cents don’t carry a mint mark.

      Reply
      • I have a 1952 and 1955 Wheat Penny with the D mark below the year. I also have a 1943 steel wheat penny and a few other 1942 and 1941 wheat pennys. Any of them worth anything?

        Reply
        • Hi, Pete —

          Assuming your coins are in typical circulated grades, each is worth 3 to 5 cents; the steel cent has a value closer to 10 to 25 cents.

          Reply
  2. sir
    I have a 1899 indian head wheat back penny and also a 1895 indian head wheat back gold penny could you tell me their valvue

    Reply
    • Hi, Phil —

      An 1899 Indian Head penny is worth about $2 to $3 in typical lower circulated grades without damage. Its value is higher if it has only light to moderate wear. If your 1895 Indian Head cent is gold-plated, it would have value only as a novelty coin, bringing in a price of under $5 in most cases.

      Reply
    • Hi Jim,

      A regular 1955 cent is worth less than $2, even in mid-range uncirculated grades.

      The so-called Poor-Man’s Double die can be bought for under $5.

      The real 1955 Double Die sells for nearly $1,000, and that’s if the coin is in the lowest circulated grades…

      Reply
  3. is 1943 steel wheat penny worth more than a dollar if it has 3 little black spots on it
    mine has 3 little black spots but you can still see everthing on the penny.

    Reply
    • Pennyboy,

      Unfortunately in your case, spots tend to decrease the value of coins. The only way yours would be worth more than $1 is if it is uncirculated. Otherwise, the value of your coin is around 20 cents to about 75 cents in the typical circulated grades.

      Reply
    • Hi, RW —

      The wheaties in this article refer to Lincoln cents with the wheat ears back. Your 1907 Indian cent is, in typical worn condition, worth around $2 to $3.

      Reply
  4. I have a 1941 wheat penny and a double stamped 1953 wheat penny…what are theyt worth…i was jst gunna use em as regular pennies?? what shall i do???

    Reply
  5. I have a 1941 wheat penny and a double stamped 1953 wheat penny…what are theyt worth…i was jst gunna use em as regular pennies?? what shall i do???

    Reply
  6. Hello! I’m Michael and i live in SASKATCHEWAN! I love finding wheat pennies in my change. 🙂 my oldest is a 1925s wheatpenny. then i have a 1934 wheat penny 🙂 2 1941D’s. 1942D all wheat pennies :). my fav is my 1955D because i found it when i was seven and now i’m 15!!! But i like em all!!!! i found a 1955s but i lost it!!! 🙁 and a 1956 but i lost it 🙁 sad sad sad 🙁 not i leave em all nicely displayed on my clothed table in my room. over 395 coins collected very few of them are wheaties but i enjoy them dearly :). its -40 deg celcius out today!!!

    Reply
    • Hi, Michael —

      Lincoln wheat cents are a perennial favorite of so many coin collectors. They’re fun to look for in pocket change and even more fun to try and collect a date run of. It’s getting pretty difficult to build even a decent partial set from circulation, but it’s still a fun challenge to pull whatever dates you can find!

      Have fun with your Lincoln wheat pennies!

      Reply
    • Eric,

      There wouldn’t be a letter on the back… the mintmark would actually be under the date. If there isn’t any mintmark, your 1911 penny is worth between 50 cents and $1 in typical circulated grades.

      Reply
  7. i have a 1914d wheat penny very good condition could you help me find out how much it is worth have seen so many different prices confused

    Reply
    • Gail,

      Assuming your 1914-D penny is authentic and not damaged (not bent, corroded, cleaned, has holes or lots of nicks and such), your coin is worth at least $150.00 the reason you see so many different prices is because its value is largely based on how much (or little) wear it has.

      The best way we could help you is if you could post a photo of your coin on The Fun Times Guide to Coins Facebook wall. Seeing the coin will really help in narrowing in on about how much it may be worth. Here’s the link: https://www.facebook.com/#!/TheFunTimesGuideToCoins

      Reply
  8. joshua i know your not a an expert at quarters but if i have colected all 50 quarters how much would it be worth

    Reply
  9. I want to buy a 1909vdb (red) uncirculated wheat penny. the seller is asking $175.00. item is not certified as yet which I want to have done. should I buy it or not? item is clean and stored away in a safety deposit box. look forward to any suggestions. thanks

    Reply
    • Brian,

      A truly red early Lincoln cent is always a desirable piece. I would hope that the 1909 VDB you’re considering is in impeccable shape, because it is possible to buy red 1909 VDB cents for less than $175, but those pieces sometimes have small specks or other moderate imperfections.

      Reply
    • Tolman,

      A 1930 D or S penny is worth 10 to 20 cents; if you have a 1930 penny that has a B on it, then the B was not placed there by the U.S. Mint and your piece is therefore an altered coin with essentially no numismatic value.

      I think I’d double check the letter and make sure it’s not a D or an S (because those mintmarks are small and can be difficult to read sometimes!)

      By the way, here’s some more info on mintmarks if you’re interested: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/mint_marks_letters_on_coins/

      Reply
  10. i have a 1909 s penny with no vdb maring. im confused on how to tell what condition its in, and i was wondering how much that could make or break the valure of these things and what i can get for it if its in good condition, or fine or excellent or something.

    Reply
    • Sss,

      Pretty much with coins like yours, the grade of your coin (how much wear it has) is the biggest factor in determining your coin’s value. As long as it’s in at least minimal collectible grades, has NOT been cleaned, and has no other forms of damage, a typical 1909-S Lincoln cent is worth at least $75 to $100, though potentially much more.

      Here is a basic guide on grading coins: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/how_to_grade_a_coin_grades/

      Please let us know if we can be of any further help with this coin or any others.

      Reply
  11. I have quite a few 1955S  wheat pennies and a quite few steel 1943 .
     how do you know if the 55’s are double and how do you know the value
    of the steel ones or how can you tell?

    Reply
    • steel wheat pennies aren’t worth very much at all but the are pretty nifty because they can stick to a magnet and you can tell that the 1955s are double because it looks like you have double vision when you look at the penny you see the image of a regular 1955 wheat penny and then you see the sam image of the penny slightly down and off to the side

      Reply
  12. i have a 1941 wheat penny that ive notice has another stamp on it! or print that is visable could you plz tell me more about it and is it worth anything. ill try n post a pic of it to show the stamp on it. just need a better camra to show details of it thank you.

    Reply
  13. i have a 1944… so that was almost a 55! AHHH well not almost…. but one number off for each. So this is worth ten cents! 🙁 great

    Reply
      • Only 24,000 or so 1955 cents were doubled die. Perhaps only 10,000 or so remain today. Tens of millions of 1955 pennies were struck normally and without any evident error whatsoever.

        Reply
    • The fact is that Lincoln wheat cents were officially made from 1909 to 1958 and Lincoln Memorial pennies were first struck in 1959.

      Reply
    • Mt,

      It was gold plated by a private company or individual and is worth a couple dollars on the novelty coin market.

      Reply
    • Hi, Yanna –

      It sounds like there may have been some damage to the die, which produces the image on a blank coin. While this doesn’t really add any value to the coin, it’s definitely an interesting piece to have.

      Reply
  14. Also i have a 2012 doubled die i think the liberty , date , and in god we trust is doubled , What is it worth?

    Reply
  15. I can’t find any record of a 1909-S VDB doubled die Lincoln cent. Perhaps it experienced machine doubling, which a is a form of damage? Can you please post a pic of this coin here in the comments forum so we can figure out what’s going on with the coin and perhaps determine a rough value? Thanks!

    Reply
  16. I have a 1919 wheat penny that is colored as if it were uncirculated yet the features on it have some wear. Is this because the coin has been cleaned?

    Reply
    • Hi, Bill –

      If there were a pic of the coin, we may be able to tell more so exactly what the situation is with your coin, but it sounds like your coin is indeed cleaned given the description.

      Reply
  17. I have several hundred wheat pennies that I would like to sell… is there a specific place/person that will buy them?

    Reply
  18. I’m just now starting my collection I had sixty’s seventy’s eighty’s ninety’s 2000 2010. the bus because I can’t find anything lower than 1960.

    Reply
  19. I have recently began collecting coins, and the coins I came across most often were the wheat pennies. One has something odd about it that i cannot find in the others. My 1946 wheat penny has no stamp of origin, it is not scratched off it’s just not there could this mean I have a rare penny?

    Reply
  20. hello i have a 1911 wheat penny that is marked with the number 26 across the top and it goes through some of the letters of the United States of America
    could you tell me what this is?

    Reply
    • Hi, Mary –

      Unfortunately, somebody scrawled these numbers into the coin, which means it will be considered damaged. Your coin is still worth around 5 to 10 cents.

      Reply
  21. I have a 1943 penny that appears to be steel. I also have two other copper pennies, one from 1944 and the other from 1958. They all are missing a letter under the date . Can anyone tell me how much they may be worth?

    Reply
    • Hi, Sydney –

      Definitely. First off, if your old pennies lack a letter, called a mint mark, under the date, then they were made at the Philadelphia mint. Your 1943 cent is worth around 10 cents and the 1944 and 1958 pennies are each worth 3 to 5 cents.

      Reply
    • Hi, Alex –

      Yes, a 1936 Lincoln cent is worth around 5 to 10 cents in typical, circulated condition.

      Reply
  22. How can you tell if a wheat penny is steel or copper? I tried using a magnet and they didnt stick but the newer pennies dont stick either.

    Reply
    • Hi, Adrienne –

      The only year that the U.S. Mint intended to make steel pennies for circulation was 1943 (there are some very rare ones dated 1944). Other than that, all other U.S. pennies contain some amount of copper and will not stick to a magnet.

      Reply
    • Hi, Loretta –

      The circle may be post-mint damage. If that is true, then your 1949 Lincoln cent is unfortunately worth only a couple cents.

      Reply
  23. hi i have some old pennies and was wondering if you could tell me what they’re worth? one is 1952 with a S beneath, another says 1956 with a D beneath, and the last is just 1947

    Reply
    • Hi, Charlotte –

      The values of your coins are the following (assuming each coin has an average amount of wear for its age):

      1947 Lincoln cent: 5 cents
      1952-S Lincoln cent: 7 cents
      1956-D Lincoln cent: 3 cents

      If you have anymore questions, please feel free to ask!

      Reply
    • Hi, Ben –

      Your coin may have either been plated with a metal such as pewter or silver or, more likely, covered with mercury.

      Reply
  24. I like copper & was picking out of circulation pennies minted before 1970 (I was born in 1969 so my theory was I needed ones as old or older than me). I read online that the ones minted before 1983 are good to keep. Yesterday, I went through my penny jar and set aside the ones before 1983. I like shiny copper so, I cleaned my older coins last year with silver polish. I am reading now that is not really the right thing. So I guess I should not clean these here from 1970-1982 sitting on my table. What is the best way to store them? I had them all just in the bottom of a drawer. I don’t think a plastic bag is right. So now I corralled the ones from pre-1970 into a cloth coin purse and the ones from 1970-1982 are in a pile on the table wanting to be shined-up, in my opinion. I mean, yesterday, I found one from 1919 that someone gave me as change and I shined it up with silver polish so I could see it better. OOOPs, right? Help, I don’t know what I am doing!

    Reply
  25. Can someone with real knowledge about this kind of thing help me understand what to make of this 1944 Lincoln Wheat Penny I have with a tiny, tiny “B” under the date (1944). I know about the SVDB on the back of some 1944 Lincoln Wheats, so you needn’t explain that part to me.

    Honestly, I just don’t know what this coin is about. I cannot find any assistance so far on the coin websites; of course, they all mention plain, the “D” and the “S.” But, a “B”? Has anyone heard of that.

    I would be so grateful at any help anyone can provide, even if the assistance isn’t an answer, but is only the next direction I should go in my investigation. You all seem so knowledgeable. I’m way out of my league here!

    Reply
    • Hi, Joan –

      May we see a photo of your coin? While there are “D” and “S” mintmarks under the date of some 1944 Lincoln cents, if it is a “B,” then it may either be a type of die error that would have caused the “D” or “S” mintmarks to look mis-shapen, or it is quite possible that somebody inscribed the “B” there on the coin.

      Reply
      • I just ran across this again, and I don’t know if Joshua is even still here, but I can tell him for certain that no one inscribed the “B” on that coin. Be it right or wrong, the “B” clearly came from the mint that way.

        Oh, and Joshua was so very kind to offer assistance. If I find where I put that penny I will post a picture, though I’m aware that no one probably cares about it by now!

        Reply
        • Hi, Joan —

          If there is a photo of that piece I would be glad to examine it and see what might be going on, but the only mint-made letters under the date on 1944 Lincoln cents are either “D” or “S,” which often look mis-shapen due to circulation wear and damage, and could potentially cause either of those letters to look like a letter “B.” Interestingly, there are several different known (and unusual) die varieties of Lincoln cents from that year, but none of them involve any mintmarks or letters other than the normal.

          As long as I’m here at The Fun Times Guide (going on eight years now), I’ll definitely care about helping any readers wit their questions however I can!

          Have a wonderful day,
          Josh

          Reply
  26. I have indian head wheat pennies….2, I can’t remember the dates off hand without digging them out….I also have a few other cents from early times….sets as well….do you only deal with pennies?

    Reply
      • Hello Josh, i have a pristine 1902 Indian head Wheat cent. A 1918 silver standing liberty, 1925 Lincoln wheat, 1930 buffalo nickle 3 silver quarters dates 1964, 1943 & 1956.

        Reply
        • Hello, Kimberly –

          Sounds like you have a very nice coin collection! Now, if by pristine, you mean your 1902 Indian Head cent is uncirculated, it would be worth anywhere between $30 and $50 or more. Even a lightly worn 1902 Indian Head cent is worth $10 to $20.

          If moderately worn, your 1918 Standing Liberty quarter has a value of $30 to $45.

          As for the 1925 Lincoln cent, it is worth 10 to 25 cents.

          The 1930 Buffalo nickel is worth around $1 to $2.

          Your quarters are each worth around $5.

          Thanks for the question!

          Reply
  27. Hi I have a 1919 s wheat penny missing the ‘ib’ in liberty is it worth anything? I also have a 1944 d wheat penny that has a big slash diagonally behind the 9 in the date so it was there before it was minted because the date is over it. I have 3 pennies that are off centered a 1980 and the edging width that of a normal penny, a 1972 the edging goes from thin to wide slightly, and last a 1973 that is really wide and thick on one side and is double edged on that side with the outer edge being taller. Any clue on their worth? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hello, Maria –

      The 1919-S cent sounds as though it was weakly struck; it probably has a value of around 50 cents to $1.

      Your 1944-D penny may have a die crack but it is hard to say without seeing a photo of it. With a die crack, it may have additional value to those who collect Lincoln cent varieties.

      Off-centered pennies generally increase in value in relation to how much of the coin is off-center. One must usually be off-center by at least 5 to 10% to have any additional value beyond face.

      Thanks for your questions!

      Reply
  28. I have a 1955 wheat penny with a slanting I in the liberty on the back of the coin…None of my other wheats look like this 1. Also I have a1945 wheat penny that appears to have an extra stalk on the wheat leaf.. it partially covers the a in America.

    Reply
  29. i have a 1910 wheat no mint 1925 wheat 25 is small 1938 wheat 1929 wheat 1918 wheat 1944 wheat (2) 1953 wheat’s 1952 wheat 1956 wheat all with no mint marks 1910 is worn but u still can see everything 1925 is in great shape 38 29 18 53’s 52 56 in good shape 44 has a slight been in the front. i also have (2) 1956 d both in good shape 57 d 53 d 54 d 58 d all in good shape. I would like to know what they are worth. thank you very much.

    Reply
  30. Hi there. My late father was a self proclaimed; ‘Coin Accumulator’ (as opposed to a collector). He left each of his children 42 ammunition cases filled with mostly pennies, all rolled or carded and ALL being before 1972. I have phoned several coin dealers in Los Angeles (where I live) and they all have offered .2 each before 1958 anything past that, only face value. None want to bother with the dates (which start in the 1910’s) that I have. I’ve only scratched the surface as I brought only 3 ammo cans-worth back from the Midwest where I’m from from. I’d like to sell them for more than .2 each or face value. I spent my childhood sorting coins on long winter nights with my father. Great memories and seems a shame that all his (our) hard work isn’t worth more than .2 each.

    I see ‘values’ listed everywhere, but no one seems to be BUYING coins. Can you help? Ebay will bury me in fees if I do one-offs and I really don’t have the time to go through the ones I have more than just putting them all in date order. Help!

    Reply
  31. Hello everyone…. I would like to know if a penny I have from 1893 has any value well its my aunts penny;)……. I’ll like to know if collectors are seriously looking for 1943/1944 pennies and paying out $100,000.00? Thank you for your response

    Reply
    • Hello, Nancy —

      A typical 1936 Lincoln cent in worn condition is worth 5 to 10 cents.

      Thanks for your question!

      Reply
    • Hello, Michael —

      A 1943 penny that doesn’t stick to a magnet could certainly be a candidate for authentication as a 1943 copper penny, the one that’s worth more than $100,000. However, there are many other diagnostic tests that such a coin must pass before being considered authentic. For example, how much does your coin weigh? A real 1943 copper penny would weigh 3.11 grams. It’s also important to determine if the date looks correct. A real 1943 copper penny has an elongated “3,” with the bottom portion of the “3” extending down toward the base of the “4” in the date.

      I hope this helps. Please let me know if you need any further assistance!

      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Scott —

      The mintmarks can indicate precisely what issue your coin is and, thus, how much it is worth. However, in the case of 1943 steel cents, the no letter (Philadelphia mint), D (Denver mint), and S (San Francisco) pieces are worth the same in worn condition, or 10 to 25 cents each.

      Here’s more info on mintmarks and what they mean: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/mint_marks_letters_on_coins/

      Thanks for your question!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Will —

      I’m sorry to say that based on the photo I see it looks like your coin may be a replica of some sort. There are many of these replicas on the market, and most have nominal value of a couple dollars.

      There are many things about your coin that strike me as suspect, including the size and placement of the VDB lettering, shape and style of the lettering in UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, color of the coin, and other diagnostic markers.

      If I could see a photo of the obverse, I could point out other device issues that would lead me to suspect this coin is a replica, too. I hope the info I provided you helps in identifying an authentic 1909-S VDB cent versus a replica in the future.

      If you have any further questions, please don’t hesitate to ask!

      All the best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Eagle —

      It’s very possible that extensive wear has obliterated the VDB initials under Lincoln’s shoulder on your 1955-S Lincoln cent, but a photo would help me determine that.

      I wouldn’t mind taking a look at a photo if you can upload one, please!

      Thanks for your question,
      Joshua @ TheFunTimesGuide

      Reply
  32. i have about 300 1955 pennies. I am starting the process of looking for the double die, but I’ve noticed that most of these pennies appear uncirculated or close to that. About 1/3 look super shiny and new while the others, though in perfect condition, appear either brown or red. Are these worth anything if they arrant a double die type?
    My fiancé has a coin collection from his father. All are loose and ungraded. There are about 50 old Morgans, Mercury dimes, Peace dollars, etc.. Those seem easier to locate info on but the 1000+ old wheat pennies, Indian nickels,etc.. are overwhelming. I know to look for key dates but my biggest question for this lot is… If the dates are old, say most before the forties, and I have many old multiples that might be more common but the condition on some seem pretty nice considering their age, what is my best bet for these? Are collectors interested in old coins with more common dates if the condition is nice? There are just so many that I think it would cost me more to have them inspected or graded than what their value is. Im sorry about the novel I just wrote and all of the questions, just hoping to gather some info as to what our next step should be?
    Thank you for your time and knowledge, it is very much appreciated! Jaimie

    Reply
    • Hello, Jaimie —

      Great question — the short answer to your main question is yes, collectors WILL pay more for a nice version of a “common” coin versus one that is well worn. As you probably know, it’s best to not clean any of your coins. This will absolutely lower their value by 50 percent or more.

      Regular 1955 cents that appear to have little or no wear are worth at least 5 to 8 cents each, so if you think that makes it worth your time to continue sorting through then by all means do so. I do recommend a 5x magnifying glass, which will make the task of looking for that doubled die much easier.

      I would advise you to check out this article about the 43 pennies worth saving — they include not just the well-known rarities, like the 1955 doubled die and 1909-S VDB cent, but also other valuable coins, like the 1911-S, 1924-D cent, etc: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/valuable-pennies/

      I also have some more info about Indian Head cents: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/indian_heady_penny_value/

      Please feel free to post follow-up questions if you feel the need. I’m glad to help!

      Reply
  33. I have a 1937 wheat penny but the whole 7 is not stamped just the upper part of the 7 is on their is it worth anything.

    Reply
    • Hi, Miranda –

      Would you please post a photo of the 1937 and 1955-D (“Red”) pennies? The 1940-D is worth 5 cents and the 1943 steel cent has a value of 10 to 20 cents.

      Thanks for your question,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Phillip —

      You have a Philadelphia mint 2007 Lincoln cent that is worth face value if worn. Thanks for checking in!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  34. I have a 1943 copper penny can you tell me what its worth did the magnet test would,t pick it up, have two others 1943 penny,s that the magnet did pick up! here a picture if you can tell me anything about this 1943 copper penny or where to take it for someone to look at it and let me know something about it?

    Reply
    • Hi, Bev —

      It looks to me like the Lincoln cent in the picture may be a 1940, 1946, or 1948, but I can’t tell as the photo may be a tad blurry at least on my end.

      The “3” on the 1943 steel cents is very distinctive for its long, pointy bottom half. The “3” will look the same on authentic 1943 copper cents as it does on 1943 steel cents.

      I hope this helps!
      Josh

      Reply
  35. I have this 1923 s with a mark on the shoulder. I have been looking for this specific mark and haven’t been able to find it. It is in the same location as current pennies but the mark is possibly different? Any ideas?

    Reply
    • Hi, Marina —

      It appears that the markings have been counterstamped after the coin left the mint.

      Thanks for the great photo to help me identify the stamp!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  36. I have two 1944 Wheat pennies one that has a D stamped below the year 1944 and another that does not have anything stamped below the year 1944. they are both non magnetic and i was wondering if they are worth any value other than 1 cent.

    Reply
    • Hi, Jon —

      They are worth a bit more than 1 cent. In fact, they are worth 3 to 5 cents each. I know that’s probably not as much as you may have hoped, but they are still worth more than face value as obsolete, albeit very common, old Lincoln wheat cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • ok while on that subject i recently came into posession of a silver dime year 1960 and a silver mercury dime year 1945. any idea what the value on those are?

        Reply
  37. Hello has anyone ever heard of a double denomination Lincoln cent and a Indianhead penny. I located one while searching it looks like Lincoln is wearing warpaint.

    Reply
    • Hi, Jack —

      Would you please post a photo of this coin here in the comments section?

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
  38. i need some feedback on my music , Even if its bad feedback ill take that i just need a chance i speend days on my wordplay so all i ask is if you just look me up and give me a fair chance .. im under keltonjamesteez you can find me on youtube , google , or even soundcloud … but just lemme know please feedback !!

    Reply
  39. I have a 1944 wheat penny that has a 9 stamped under United States of America. I would like to know what this means in terms of value.

    Reply
    • Hi, Cheri —

      Would you please post a photo of this coin? It’s likely the “9” stamped under the inscription is a post mint counterstamp.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Joe —

      Without seeing a photo of the coin it is hard to say for sure what caused the “T” to go missing, but it is probably die weakness, which wouldn’t add any value to the coin. A 1955-D Lincoln cent in a typical circulation/wear state is worth 3 to 5 cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Cyndi —

      In all likelihood it is a regular steel cent. These are worth 10 to 25 cents each if worn. You can tell if a 1943 Lincoln cent is steel or copper based on whether or not it sticks to a magnet. If it does, then it’s a steel cent.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • I am confused, I used a magnet too check my cents and the cents stuck to the magnet. Two of them are 1943 and one is a 1944 but I thought only steel cents were in 1943. Any thoughts on this coin

        Reply
        • Hi, Jason —

          Your 1944 penny is sticking to a magnet? Would you please upload a photo of that coin? It would also be important to know how much that coin weighs. 1944 cents made from copper weigh 3.11 grams, whereas steel cents (such as the 1943) come in at 2.7 grams.

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
  40. Hey Jay, Dave here. Thanks for the great and informative article. I collect copper pennies (using a sorting machine) and always pull out wheat and other interesting pennies from the copper pile. Anyhow, I came across a penny that was in the copper pile that was glistening. It was a 1962 D copper penny with a reddish hue. The penny still glistens and there are little to no visible marks on the penny. (only mark is a small black spot about a half mm in size above the date) All lettering is easy to see and again there is really no wear to the letters on the penny. While the penny was technically in circulation because I got it from a roll of pennies from my bank it looks as though it was uncirculated and somehow gotmixed into someones roll of pennies. Based on my limited grading knowledge I would grade it as AU58. What is this penny worth?

    Reply
    • Hi, Dee —

      Josh here, the resident coin guy at TheFunTimesGuide. Technically, the rub would, as you properly indicated, render it a circulated piece. Most price guides would say such a piece is worth just face value, but in reality these early Lincoln Memorial cents often trade for closer to 2 to 3 cents in this condition.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  41. I have a coin that is a penny one side and the other is a dime. How can that be? I would like to know the value if any

    Reply
    • Hi, Jarellis —

      You have an illusionist’s altered coin that is supposed to be manipulated using sleight of hand techniques to make a dime turn into a penny, or vice versa. Essentially, it is a carved out penny that has a slot large enough to accommodate a dime.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Kaylee —

      The “I” in “LIBERTY” is often either weakly struck, worn away, or sometimes removed (among other letters) deliberately after the coin has left the Mint. While I can’t say for sure what happened without seeing a photo of your coin (which you can post here in the comments section if you want), I can say the value of your coin is approximately 5 cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Nolan —

      Without seeing your coin, I really can’t provide an exact value absent knowing its condition, but assuming it exhibits typical wear for its age, the value of your piece should be 3 to 5 cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  42. Hello. I have a 1911 Wheat Penny with no small mint letter, but a huge capital P engraved/stamped into the penny above the year. Any idea what that might be?

    Reply
    • Hello, Katie —

      It sounds like your coin was inscribed or counterstamped after it left the mint. I am curious as to who would have stamped that “P” above the date and what it means — it could be an interesting story if that coin could talk!

      At any rate, your 1911 Lincoln cent is worth a minimum of 10 cents, though collectors who focus on novelty coins might pay a small premium above that for your piece, given its “P” counterstamp.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Nathanail –

      Without seeing an image I can’t say for certain, but a combination of being weakly struck and focused wear may explain the missing “PLU.”

      Normally, such an anomaly would not make the coin any more valuable.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  43. also have two 1901 indian head pennys one of them has a clearly noticeable error on the left wheat stalk where somthing must have been on the die or planchet at stamping and also the second t in states is also noticeable to the naked eye it has the whole right side top half of the t is missing as well as other imperfections all over it im pretty sure are due to its minting process

    Reply
    • Hi, Nathanail —

      I would be glad to check out a photo of your 1901 Indian cents and see if I can attribute what’s going on here!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  44. I have a 1952 or 1953 wheat penny i cant tell the date because its not fully printed on back or front. I be happy to show the front as well but it wont let me post two pictures. Any clue how much? I also have 1956, 1942 x2, 1949, 1957 and 1952 wheat pennys. If there anything i should look out for on them let me know. I love to know the value. I also have a lot of coins from over 40 countries And years and a few bills as well. I would like to be able to talk more about them with you. My e-mail is jonathanhousley1518@yahoo.com
    Thanks jon

    Reply
    • Hi, Jonathan!

      Thanks for posting the image that you did. Both 1952 and 1953 Lincoln wheat cents are worth about the same in worn condition — 5 to 8 cents.

      Nice classic coin find!
      Josh

      Reply
        • Hi, Jonathan!

          Please see if you can post photos again using the photo icon, or you may post them to The Fun Times Guide Coins Facebook page.

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
    • Hi, Dustin —

      The most important thing to do in this case would be to weigh the coin; this could help determine what the coin is made from (or plated with).

      For comparison, a typical 1940 Lincoln cent should weigh about 3.11 grams.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
        • Hi, Dustin —

          If your penny, which weighs 3.11 grams, is magnetic, then it must have been plated with steel or another magnetic metal. Steel cents weigh 2.7 grams, which is significantly less than the amount your coin weighs, therefore your piece was not struck on a steel planchet (coin blank).

          If your coin is indeed altered, it won’t have any numismatic value, but nonetheless is an interesting novelty coin.

          I hope this helps,
          Josh

          Reply
  45. I have a bunch of these that someone just gave me from am old house clean up…there are 1909 -1960 some are in a Lincoln blue penny book. There is like five of those and rolls of pennies marked 1940 s 1930 s .I met with a guy from Craigslist and he said he could only do 2c to a penny. Then I saw this online I’m just curious of the value .

    Reply
    • Hi, Momma —

      WIthout knowing the dates of each coin, it’s hard to say if the price you were quoted is fair. While two cents is a common going rate for well-worn, common date Lincoln wheat cents from the 1940s and 1950s, many earlier pieces are worth more.

      I urge you to check out this page to see if you have any pieces with potentially significant value: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/valuable-pennies/

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
  46. I have a 1919 penny, there is no letter stamp under the date or any letters between the feather, how much would it be worth? I apologize for the poor pictures

    Reply
  47. I have a 1919 penny, there is no letter stamp under the date or any letters between the feather, how much would it be worth?

    Reply
  48. hi my name is april n i have a 1969s dd penny… ive done tones of searching and it has the variations of double die on front n back… any ideas on how much possibly

    Reply
    • Hello, April —

      While a 1969-S doubled die Lincoln cent can be worth more than $50,000, it’s important to get a really good diagnostic look at the coin before knowing for sure whether or not you have the valuable piece. Please feel free to post a photo here if you would like me to give a further opinion on your coin!

      Thanks,
      Josh

      Reply
  49. Hello everyone… I have about 4 huge bags of wheat pennies, & other bags of coins as well.
    But this one coin I have is very awesome & shiny to be well over 100yrs old..
    Its A perfect 1925 Lincoln Wheat Penny.
    I just wanted to know if it is worth anything?
    I can send in pics of it, but not at this moment.
    Any help would be greatly appreciated…

    Thank you.
    Thomas

    Reply
  50. Hello, My uncle has a 1943 steel penny, is it worth anything? he also has an 1891 Indian head penny, a 1944 D Penny, a 1926 penny, as well as a 1952 D penny

    Reply
    • Hi, Gerardo —

      Here are the values of his coins, assuming them to be in average circulated condition:

      *1891 Indian cent — $3
      *1926 Lincoln cent — 40 cents
      *1943 Lincoln steel cent — 25 cents
      *1944-D Lincoln cent — 10 cents
      *1952-D Lincoln cent — 10 cents

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  51. My husband found a 1919 s penny deep in the woods of Missouri where an old house use to be. How do you clean them and how much is it worth?

    Reply
    • Hi, Shane —

      You really shouldn’t clean any coins as it ruins their surfaces and cuts their value by at least 50 percent. A 1919-S Lincoln cent is worth about 50 cents and up. A photo of the coin could tell me more about its value based on the amount of wear it has.

      Great find!
      Josh

      Reply
  52. I have a 1910 wheat penny that looks in real good condition except the a in America in a little faded. How much would it be worth?

    Reply
    • Hi, Raelynn —

      If you can read that much of the coin’s inscriptions, it’s worth at least 25 cents. It may be worth more based on its condition, but that’s something I’d only be able to determine by photo.

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Daniel!

      Your 1952 Lincoln cent appears to have been plated with zinc. Your piece is worth 2 to 3 cents. While this is a regular coin that was plated after it left the Mint, it’s nevertheless an interesting coin.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  53. I have three wheat pennies for sale. 1922, 1942, 1950 is there anyone intrested or can someone direct me to the highest buyer i can sell them to

    Reply
  54. hi I was wondering if you could help me I’m just starting out collecting and finding rare valuable coins and I know pretty much absolutely nothing about them do you think you could look at the few Coins that I have and tell me I’m not wasting my time

    Reply
  55. I have 5 complete rolls of 1942 P pennies. I’ve heard several different valued amounts for these but, not sure what to believe now a days. Just wondering if someone could help me out.

    Reply
    • Hi, Zach –

      Assuming all of the coins in these five rolls are circulated, they’re worth about 5 to 10 cents each. Bear in mind that buy prices for entire rolls are often lower for the 50 than the value of the 50 individual coins (bulk price mentality here). You would probably get offered somewhere between $1.50 and $2.50 for each roll, more or less.

      That’s the price you’d likely receive if you sold them to a coin dealer. If you sell them on eBay, you may receive more.

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
  56. Hi!I have a roll of 1963 mint wheat pennies.They were rolled by my grandfather as soon as they came out.I saw somewhere they were worth about $15 a piece.Is that true?

    Reply
    • Hi, Nickie –

      As the U.S. Mint didn’t strike coins commonly referred to as wheat pennies in 1963, I’m not exactly sure what you’re asking about and would love to please see a photo of your coins to better assist you.

      Thank you!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Ed —

      Unfortunately, it appears these three coins have been cleaned, which cuts their values by half or more over their worth if they had not been cleaned. Thankfully, these coins are relatively common, and thus they aren’t worth terribly less on the dollars-and-cents side of the issue than if they were in original condition. Please find approximate values below:

      1901 Indian Head Cent – 50 cents to $1
      1944-D Lincoln cent – 2 to 3 cents
      1946-S Lincoln cent – 2 to 3 cents

      These are still very old, obsolete coins and are neat to have in a collection.

      Great finds!
      Josh

      Reply
  57. I found these 3 Indian head pennies and would like to know what they are worth. I went metal detecting and this is what I got: 2-1897(no mint mark), and a 1906(no mint mark). I’ve got a ton of wheaties and a couple with doubling and one that I know of and see that the 4 is too small and the other numbers are large. Not often on this site but I can be reached through email where I can send more pictures.

    Reply
    • Hi, Eric —

      Please feel free to upload the images right here in the comments forum and I’ll be glad to take a look.

      I can tell you off the bat that, assuming the coins aren’t terribly worn and aren’t cleaned or corroded, your 1897 and 1906 Indian Head cents should each be worth $1 to $2, and perhaps more if there are still plenty of details remaining and the coins don’t appear to have any surface problems.

      Here’s more info on other valuable pennies: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/valuable-pennies/

      Congrats on those great finds!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Erica —

      The close AM style is intention on all (circulation and proof) 1993 cents and thus these are normal.

      I see what appears to be machine doubling on the Roosevelt dime obverse (IN GOD WE TRUST) and ERICA (AMERICA) on the first 1993 cent posted. This is actually a fairly common type of die damage and us not the same thing as a doubled die. These are usually worth at best an extra 25 to 50 cents on worn modern-day Lincoln cents.

      I can’t tell if the “C”-shaped metal on the obverse of the 1967 Roosevelt dime is a die chip or post-Mint damage, but based on the missing segment of rim to the left of the “C,” I think it is die damage from a chunk of metal that was shoved up into the date.

      The missing bottom part of the “E” in “AMERICA” on the reverse of the Buffalo nickel was caused by a major hit of some sort to the coin after it left the Mint. If you look closely, you can see a bunch of flattened metal, much of which used to be the lower part of the “E.”

      I hope this info is helpful in better understanding what happened to those neat coins you posted!

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply
  58. Hi, Tammy!

    I don’t see any signs of this being a doubled die based on what I see in the photo. It does appear to have been cleaned. If i may ask, where do you see the doubling on the coin in-person?

    If this coin has no doubling, it’s worth about 5 to 8 cents in this condition.

    Thank you for your question and photos!
    Josh

    Reply
    • Hello, Angel —

      The 1928 Lincoln wheat penny is worth about 10 to 15 cents. The 1944 and 1957 wheat pennies are worth about 3 to 5 cents each.

      The 1964 Sierra Leone half cent is worth about 25 to 50 cents in this condition.

      These are some classic 20th century coins! Nice pieces….

      Thank you for your questions and photos,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Tammy!

      This is cool… you have a 1973-S proof Washington quarter that was designed for inclusion in a special collector set. By the way, the “S” is the mintmark for the San Francisco Mint.

      So why is this coin so shiny and well detailed? It was struck at least twice on a specially polished coin blank and was included as part of the 1973 proof set sold by the Mint that year. Somebody broke this coin from its holder and spent it. Be sure to hold it by its edge, because you’ll leave fingerprints on this coin pretty easily.

      So, what’s the value of this coin? It’s worth about $1.50.

      Here’s more info on proof coins and proof sets: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/us_mint_proof_set/

      Cool, cool find!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Tammy —

      What you have here is a piece that might very well be a early American copper coin from the period when our nation was nothing more than a collection of 13 colonies. Pieces like this can really only be authenticated in-hand, but I suggest you bring the coin to a reputable coin dealer for more insight from someone who can weigh the coin, look for signs of electroplating (a method used to create counterfeits and replicas), and to check for other diagnostics.

      Here’s info on how to find a good coin dealer: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/coin_dealer/

      And here’s a searchable list of coin dealers throughout the U.S.: https://png.memberclicks.net/find-a-png-dealer

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Love Jolly —

      It looks like you found an uncirculated — or nearly so — 1980-D Lincoln cent. That explains why it’s so shiny and has such deep detail. If this coin has absolutely no signs of wear, it’s worth about 15 to 20 cents.

      Nice find!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Love Jolly —

      This 1992-D Lincoln cent shows signs of machine doubling, which is a type of damage caused by die wear. While neat to look at, it’s not really worth anything extra, though some specialists will pay a nominal premium for these types of anomalies.

      Cool find,
      Josh

      Reply
  59. Hi Joshua –

    First, thanks for sharing all of this information re coins. I’m just trying to make sure I don’t miss the random lottery ticket while going thru my change jar ;-), and your site has been very helpful.

    I have one dime I was hoping you could give me your opinion on. It’s prob post-Mint damage, but, hey, you never know, right? 🙂

    Thanks!
    Michele https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/993565ce3e7ccf7775a72a6109abb4554438ae3e472511ba44d0a890b055b65f.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/867d637c859c293a7863f0c586f7b6eee600a1f3d7d85cf33d62eb8a0070bc7d.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/01bf4ddcb1b274a0abab9c14a2e3346115b34e72eaceabc15776ee8dbbdb90c9.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/dc728ec1ab7ede5fc9819fabf6de31f642a5a9027fccf8207cb58a0afc16bc79.jpg

    Reply
    • Hello, Udzlme —

      It never hurts to check, right? Unfortunately, what hurts is this is poor 1968-D Roosevelt dime, which — as you correctly pointed out — took some beatings in circulation. It’s worth a dime, but I bet its story, if it could tell one, would be pretty interesting to hear.

      Thank you for reaching out,
      Josh

      Reply
  60. Hi again Joshua,

    I was wondering if you have ever seen this error in the 1955 penny before. I have searched the internet and cannot find anything. On the reverse side the left wheat stalk and the U in United are connected where the U starts. It isn’t in the best shape but still pretty cool and interesting. Let me know what your opinion is on this.

    Thanks 🙂
    Angie https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/0a946349e2308f8beca994cfc77733d4ff6b3a6861d38ff8696fd3bddb3fec82.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b08d27019a504bbe0f85a9c9727233f47a907e3f0363086bd63ab72f4f3c7db2.jpg

    Reply
    • Hi, Angela —

      The connection between the “U” and the wheat stalk is surface damage, which is also present on the obverse (head’s side) of the coin. Heavy damage can often displace metal, causing craters and pits that may inadvertently (or sometimes by intentional post-Mint alteration) create seeming errors that are, in fact, simply caused by poor handling after the coin left the Mint. This piece is still worth about two cents for its copper value and may be fun to hold aside anyway since its an obsolete wheat cent.

      Thank you for your question and photos!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Margarita —

      Nice collection of wheat cents! Their color is great, too — they are original and have beautiful chocolate surfaces.

      As for value, your 1937 is worth about 10 cents, and each of the rest in this photo is worth about 5 to 8 cents.

      P.S. I love wheat cents!
      -Josh

      Reply
  61. I also used to have a uncirculated pheledelphia treasury mint coin. It said all those words on the coin to!any info u might be able give me on such a coin

    Reply
    • Hi, Rain —

      The U.S. Mint issued medals like this in 5-coin uncirculated souvenir sets sold at the Philadelphia Mint. These generally sell for $1 to $2.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Rain —

      A circulated 1937 Lincoln cent is worth 5 to 10 cents.

      Thank you for your question!
      Josh

      Reply
  62. Cool find, Alex!

    The copper coating was removed from the area around the Lincoln Memorial, exposing the coin’s inner copper core. While this piece is worth face value, it is certainly artful!

    Best wishes,
    Josh

    Reply
      • Hi, Jaya —

        The year and mintmark of your coin is important for me to give you a better answer, please. For example, a 1931-S is worth $50 and up in any grade, a 1933 has a value of 25 to 50 cents, but a 1939-S is worth 3 to 5 cents.

        Kindly looking forward to more info so I can further advise!

        Best,
        Josh

        Reply
    • Hmm, Alex…. I’m not sure on this one. I think this, also, is machine doubling but the image is a little fuzzy, and it might be a doubled die. This should be sent to CONECA for a second opinion; I’d hate to have you miss out if it’s the real McCoy! Here’s their info: https://varietyvista.com/index.htm

      I look forward to seeing more,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Randy!

      Looks like your 1942 Lincoln penny has a lot of environmental damage — corrosion, namely. This old coin is worth about 2 cents for its copper metal content but unfortunately the widespread corrosion takes away any of the collectible value of this coin.

      Thank you for reaching out!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Trey —

      Unfortunately what you’re looking at is post-Mint damage; however, your 1930-S penny is worth around 10 to 15 cents.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply

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