What Is An Old Penny Worth? See How Penny Values Are Different For Pre-1934 Pennies vs. Post-1934 Pennies

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I do my best to try and answer your questions and comments here on The Fun Times Guide to Coins, and that is why I want to take a moment and try and address one of the most common — and important — questions I get here:

“What is my old penny worth?”

This is a good question, because pretty much all of us have a stash of pennies lying around somewhere, and we come across pennies everyday in our pocket change. And, yes, some old pennies can be both very rare and very valuable.

lots of old pennies

The real toughie for some of us is knowing just which old pennies are worth a lot of money and which ones are not worth a whole lot of money.

 

A Rule Of Thumb

There is a good rule of thumb I like to go by, though it is not perfect.

Pennies dated before 1934 are generally worth more than those dated 1934 and after.

This is generally true, especially if you consider the average values of all the pennies dated 1933 and earlier, versus those dated from 1934 on.

 

Pre-1934 Penny Values

The 1909-S V.D.B., 1909-S, 1914-D, 1922 no-mintmark (also called “plain”), and 1931-S cent are worth hundreds of dollars apiece. (Except for the 1931-S, which starts at around $125 in lower grades).

There are several “D” and “S” mintmark pennies from the 1910s and 1920s that are worth tens of dollars apiece. Be sure to check out my piece on semi-key Lincoln cents to find out more about those.

And even the “highly common” pennies of most every pre-1934 date and mintmark not mentioned here are worth at least 10 to 20 cents apiece.

 

Post-1934 Penny Values

wheat-penny.jpg The pennies made from 1934 on generally saw far higher production numbers, less circulation, and more examples being saved in quantity by collectors, hoarders, and investors than the earlier Lincoln pennies.

In fact, there really are very few pennies made since 1934 that are worth much more than face value if worn. Yes, even the old pennies with the wheat stalks on the back, if worn and from the mid-1930s on, are generally worth only a few cents apiece.

 

There Are Exceptions To Every Rule

Now here is that big “but” you’ve been waiting for. There are a few exceptions to the rule about those post-1933 pennies I have been talking about.

1955-doubled-die-penny.pngTake for example, the very rare and highly valuable 1955 doubled-die cent. The value of even the most worn specimens is now approaching $1,000.

The 1943 steel cent, though a very common piece, is worth 20 to 50 cents if worn. Thus, it is more valuable than most other worn wheat cents of the era.

The rare 1943 copper cent always brings in tens of thousands of dollars (and more!) when it goes to auction.

The 1970-S small-date Lincoln cent is now worth around $50 to $60 if uncirculated.

And there are numerous doubled-die errors and varieties from the 1960s to the present day that are worth between a few dollars apiece to hundreds of dollars.

Check out the following articles to see if you have those valuable pennies:

So, to sum up, most of the pennies you find dated 1934 to the present day are worth little more than face value if worn (but some are worth more). Also, a number of the pennies dated from 1933 and earlier are worth several times more than face value (but many are highly common and worth only 10 to 20 cents apiece if highly worn).

Be sure to check out some of the other articles here at The Fun Times Guide to see if your pennies are worth hundreds and even thousands of dollars!

Here’s a video I made that shows lots of valuable pennies:


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238 thoughts on “What Is An Old Penny Worth? See How Penny Values Are Different For Pre-1934 Pennies vs. Post-1934 Pennies”

  1. Hi.. I have a 1944 penny with an S and also a 1972 penny with a S.. Value?
    I also have pennies ranging from 1947-2004 with d’s on them. Over a hundred of them being the 1988 D.. Are these worth a considerable amount of money? where could i change them in?? Would a local pawn shop take them or would i have to do something online like Ebay? Thank you for your time

    Reply
  2. I HAVE ALINCLON HEAD CENT COLLECTION STARTING 1941-1974..THE1943 ARE STEEL.BUT I WAS TOLD THE 1969 D WAS SELLING AT GOOD PRICE..

    Reply
    • Hello Lisa,

      A 1941 to 1974 Lincoln cent coin collection is a nice set. These tend to sell for around $10 to $15 in circulated grades, but can be worth far more (over $50) if all the coins are uncirculated. A dealer may buy a circulated set for around $5 to $7.

      The 1969-D isn’t a particularly scarce coin at all, so I’m not sure who told you about that coin being worth a special amount of money… It’s worth only face value if circulated, and maybe 5 to 10 cents in typical uncirculated grades. The coins in that set worth the most money are the 1941 through 1958 Lincoln cents, which are worth 3 to 5 times face value if worn and much more if uncirculated.

      Take care!

      Reply
    • Neca,

      An 1893 in typical, worn grades is worth between $2 to $5. The less wear it has, the more it’s worth. If it’s cleaned, bent, corroded, or otherwise damaged, it is worth less.

      Reply
  3. i have a donzen or so wheat pennies, and i cant find a trace of a mint mark on any of them. what does that mean for their value?

    Reply
    • Hi, JJ —

      Pennies without mintmarks are simply coins that were made in Philadelphia. Most Philadelphia cents aren’t worth much in well-worn grades. Generally, Philadelphia Lincoln cents made before 1934 are worth 10 to 20 cents each. Those made between 1934 and 1958 are worth 2 to 10 cents each.

      Reply
  4. My kids went threw their piggy bank today and well we found your site before going for a video game. finaly I found…. a 1944 weat penny and nothing under the date. then we also found a 1927 S wheat is that worth anything? I also see in the listing atop that really after 1943 they dont have much more value.

    Reply
    • Hi, Sheyshey —

      Glad to hear you checked out your coins before spending them. The 1927-S Lincoln cent is worth 10 to 15 cents, and your 1944 is worth about 3 cents assuming typical wear on both coins.

      Yes, it’s true that most Lincoln cents dated in the 1940s and 1950s really aren’t worth much over face value (unless they’re uncirculated), though there are a couple to look out for in that date range:

      A 1955 Lincoln cent with doubled date and lettering on the heads side
      The very rare 1943 copper and 1944 steel cents

      Reply
  5. Digging threw all those coins I saw that some of the 1980’s pennies have the 3rd diggit smaller then the other 3 digts, but all the coins where not like like that, is there a reason for that?

    Reply
    • Yes, Sheyshey, the digit size and shape is simply a stylistic matter, and the U.S. Mint does sometime change the size and shape of the digits on the coins. You’ll find, for example, the 1934 Lincoln cent has a very elongated-style 3, but none of the other cents from the 1930s have such a 3.

      Reply
  6. me and my grandma collected pennys and stamps. i was wondering if there some way of finding out what it is really worth can u help me with that?

    Reply
    • Hi, Nina —

      Glad to help with the coins, though I am not an expert on stamps. What kinds of coins did you and your grandmother collect? I’ll need to know so I can guide you to the right articles or give you a good idea on value estimates.

      Reply
  7. i have two of the pennies in the picture above of lincoln with the wheat stalk on the back from 1952 and 1956. i was wondering if they are worth anything. please help.

    Reply
    • Hi, Val —

      Both the 1952 and 1956 pennies are rather common. However, at 2 to 3 cents each, they do have a nominal value over face.

      Reply
  8. Ive got a 1909 penny and quite a few pre-dated 1933 i was wondering if it would be ok to clean them instead of leaving them in the condition they are in. They arent to worn out.

    Reply
    • Hi, Serg —

      So glad you asked this question! You want to leave the coins exactly as they are. Coin collectors actually like the reddish-brown to dark brown, original colors of worn pennies — if you clean them it will not only mess up the coins’ natural toning process, it will significantly lessen their value.

      Reply
    • Sure, Littleleague… each is worth face value if worn and around 5 to 10 cents each if in mint condition.

      While these are special designs, there are also hundreds of millions of these coins floating around, so they are in no way scarce. Therefore, they aren’t worth a premium unless they have been kept uncirculated in original mint rolls, bags, or coin sets.

      Reply
  9. I have a 1974 penny that has a very small profile of JFK facing Lincoln. Is it real (from the mint) and if so, is it worth anything?

    Reply
    • Hi Jadzia,

      Even though both your pennies were made many years ago, they’re still worth face value. Neat finds though! If you find any pennies made before 1959, hang onto them — THOSE are worth more than face value!

      Reply
    • Hi, Stewart —

      MSRB means “Mint State Red/Brown” and MSRD stands for “Mint State Red.”

      In reality, red pennies aren’t red — they’re bright orange. red/brown pennies have a mixture of orange and darker brown shades.

      Usually, a ‘red’ cent must have at least 90 to 95 percent orange color, whereas a red/brown penny can have between 5 and 90 to 95 percent red coloration.

      It’s safe to say the 1955 doubled die cent in this article is a great example of a Lincoln cent that borders on the red/brown and red definitions. If it was a little brighter in orange color, it would safely qualify as a red by most accounts. If the coin had more of a brownish hue or had traces of solid brown on some parts of the coin, it would represent the majority of RB pennies.

      Reply
    • Hi, Stewart —

      MSRB means “Mint State Red/Brown” and MSRD stands for “Mint State Red.”

      In reality, red pennies aren’t red — they’re bright orange. red/brown pennies have a mixture of orange and darker brown shades.

      Usually, a ‘red’ cent must have at least 90 to 95 percent orange color, whereas a red/brown penny can have between 5 and 90 to 95 percent red coloration.

      It’s safe to say the 1955 doubled die cent in this article is a great example of a Lincoln cent that borders on the red/brown and red definitions. If it was a little brighter in orange color, it would safely qualify as a red by most accounts. If the coin had more of a brownish hue or had traces of solid brown on some parts of the coin, it would represent the majority of RB pennies.

      Reply
  10. I’m not sure which country this penny belongs too or what year it is but all I know is that the penny have a picture of a bear in it. Do you know which penny it is? Thanks

    Reply
    • 1934 or 1943? 1943 steel cents are worth around 10 cents to $1 each. silver-colored 1934 pennies may have been coated with mercury by somebody outside the U.S. Mint and have no extra value.

      Reply
    • Hi, Jackie —

      Your 1919 cent is worth around 10 cents.

      Hmm… what do you mean by 1914 silver 3? I’d be happy to help if you wouldn’t mind providing a little more info on that second coin!

      Reply
  11. I have two large containers of pennies that were my grandfather’s. I’m overwhelmed at trying to sort through them to see if any are worth more than face value. Any suggestions? Do I take the time or just cash them in? Thank you!

    Reply
    • JFF,

      The only way you’re going to know if anything rare or scarce is among your pennies is to take the time and look at each one. The fact your grandfather saved them (I don’t know when though) means be some older coins in there.

      All pennies made before 1982 are worth around 2 cents each in copper (however, it’s currently illegal to melt them for the copper value), and all made before 1959 are worth 3 cents or more each.

      There’s also the chance you may have some error coins in there… these range in value from a few dollars to hundreds.

      While a search through your pennies may yield nothing special or valuable, if you decide to take the time (why not make it a weekend project or something like that), here are some links to help you:

      7 Rare Wheat Pennies: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/rare_wheat_pennies/

      Semi-Key Lincoln Cents: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/lincoln_semi_key_coins/

      Lincoln Memorial Cents Worth Up to $50,000: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/lincoln_penny/

      Reply
    • Hi, Bert —

      What do you mean “outher” edges? Normally, an 1875 penny, which is worth $10 to $20 in typical undamaged worn grades, has smooth edges… Would you please describe the edges of your coin a bit more.

      Reply
    • Kay,

      Technically they are because of the value of copper in 1959 through 1981 pennies (and some 1982 pennies, too). These coins have approximately 2 to 3 cents’ worth of copper.

      However, it’s presently illegal to melt copper pennies for their metal content, so you really won’t enjoy any immediate gain by keeping these coins, unless you want to hang onto them for the long haul; perhaps the time will come when coin collectors routinely pay more for copper Lincoln Memorial pennies.

      Reply
    • Hi, BJ —

      A 1920 penny is worth around 15 to 50 cents. A regular 1970 penny is worth face value 1 cent if worn. The 1970-S small date is a relatively scarce 1970 penny made in San Francisco that has small digits in the date than the more common 1970-S large date. Such coins are worth around $50 in uncirculated grades.

      Here’s some more info: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/lincoln_semi_key_coins/

      Reply
  12. I HAVE ONE 1886 INDIANHEAD PENNY AND TWO 1906 INDIANHEAD PENNIES..PLUS HUNDREDS MORE…VERY INTERESTED IN FINDING OUT HOW MUCH THEY ARE WORTH…

    Reply
    • Christie,

      Your 1886 and 1906 Indian pennies are worth at least $1 to $2 each, though they could be worth more based on their condition.

      Reply
    • Oraragland,

      Your 1914 and 1917 pennies are each worth approximately 10 to 20 cents in typical worn condition.

      Reply
  13. I found a 1969 red penny with an s under the date and from what I can see under a magnifying glass the liberty letters look like they are blurry could it be worth anything

    Reply
  14. I have a 1970-s penny, 1971-s penny, and 1954, no letter, nickel. Are they worth anything? All circulated, in fairly good condition.

    Reply
    • Jay,

      Technically, there is no additional value for 1970-S and 1971-S Lincoln cents if they are worn, though because they are so difficult to find, I’d hang onto them in case values increase in the future. The 1954 Jefferson nickel is worth around 10 cents.

      Reply
  15. My grandfather gave me two coins before he passed away and told me this will help you in life so he put his 2¢ in my hand ones a 1943 copper penny and the other is a 1944 silver looking one are they worth anything ?

    Reply
  16. Hi Joshua my name is fernando. I found Red penny with a kennedy face looking at mr lincond dated 1974 could it be worth anything?

    Reply
  17. would a 1917-D and 1919-s be worth anything i have a few from 1920 thru the 30 s a lot of double stamped and do you know what a 1955-p poor mans double die means

    Reply
    • Hi, Angela –

      The 1917-D and 1919-S are worth roughly 10 to 30 cents each, whereas most of the Lincoln cents made from 1920 to 1930 are worth about 10 cents, in well worn condition.

      As for the 1955 “poor man’s doubled die,” it’s basically a 1955 Lincoln cent that, due to striking damage, appears to have a slightly doubled image of the date. Worth about $1 to $2, this coin is often bought by coin collectors of lesser financial means to fill a hole in Lincoln cent coin albums that have a slot for the $1,000-and-up 1955 doubled die cent.

      Reply
    • Hi, Kurt –

      Hmm… well if your 1944-D Lincoln cent is copper (which it most likely is, but was steel plated by a private individual), then it is worth only a couple cents. A genuine 1944-D steel cent (which is highly rare and worth $50,000 or more) would weigh 2.7 grams, versus 3.1 for a copper penny.

      Reply
    • Hi, Kurt –

      Your 1918 Lincoln cent, in typical condition, is worth around 20 cents, whereas the 1956-D Lincoln cent is worth about 3 to 5 cents. There were no 1957 cents made in San Francisco, so I wonder if that 1957 penny you’re asking about was altered.

      Reply
    • Hello, Patrick –

      Even though your 1822 cent is damaged, what with the hole, it is still worth at least $3 to $5 just because of the coin’s age and relative scarcity. The hole was most likely drilled by somebody who used or sold the coin as part of a necklace – a common phenomena particularly during the middle 19th century.

      Reply
  18. I have a 1970 penny with an s under the date and has smooth edge! Looks to be small print. It is in a sealed bag and looks to have no wear on it. Could you let me know a little bit about this coin? Thank you

    Reply
    • Hi, Adena –

      There were two types of pennies made at the San Francisco mint in 1970 – the type with a large-style date and one with a smaller-style date. The 1970-S large date is worth around 50 cents in uncirculated condition, but the one with the smaller date is worth closer to $40. The base of the 7 in the date will be about on the same line as the base of the 1 on a 1970-S small date Lincoln cent. If you would like for us to check this out for you, please feel free to attach a photo of your coin here in the forum!

      Reply
          • i have 2 1969 s pennies and the s is lower on one of the take a look i also have 2 1970 s pennies and 2 1960 d pennies

          • Hi, Tupac –

            It looks like your 1969-S Lincoln cents have signs of machine doubling, which can sometimes mimic the appearance of a doubled die, but are much more common. Therefore, in this case, your coins would unfortunately not be worth any premium.

            Thanks for checking with us! Please let us know if you find any other coins that you’re curious about!

  19. 1963-Can silver $…, US 1776-1976 silver $…US 1972 silver $..US 1977 & 1979 silver half $..Can 1937 penny (enclosed in metal), 1937 Us penny,
    1939 (Farthing?) penny/not sure if its US/Can…1915 .5 cent Belgioue Beloie ?…and the last, Newfoundland penny 1938.
    From my research…all are valuable, and the NFLD penny seems to be of greatest value.

    Reply
  20. Hello Joshua,

    I have several questions I was hoping may get answered.

    1- Are most silver coins (dimes, quarters, half dollars, etc.) dated prior to 1964 really worth more than ones from 1965 – present?

    2- In my parent’s coin collections, I found some unusual items – some are blue while most are red – I suspect this may be something handed out during WWII. Are these ‘red’ cents – and like the expression – that isn’t worth a red cent a reference to this – and is it really worthless?

    3- What’s the story with nickels – are they pretty much all worth the same? Seems like the nickel gets neglected when it comes to value… and lastly

    4- Is it true any penny 1981 or older (and some from 1982) are worth more simply because they have greater copper content than newer ones (again some from 1982 and) from 1983 – present?

    Thanks.

    JC

    Reply
    • Hi, Freddy –

      A tough find these days, but a 1959-D Lincoln cent, if worn, is still worth only a penny.

      Reply
    • Hi, Becky –

      Yes, your 1920 Lincoln cent is worth around 10 cents whereas your 1941 and 1956 pennies are each worth around 5 cents. Your 1969-S Lincoln cent is technically worth one cent, but all S-mint Lincoln pennies have become highly scarce in circulation and may at some point command a slight premium in circulated grades.

      Reply
    • Hello, Brianna –

      A 1937 United States Lincoln cent is worth around 10 cents – but is an obsolete design and is a coin your cousin might want to hang on to.

      Reply
  21. I have 4 1960 -P pennies that are all separated in plastic bags. They come from a collection that was my aunts so not sure what they are worth if anything? Thank you..

    Reply
    • Hello, Kathy –

      Some 1960 Lincoln cents have small dates and others large; small date Lincoln cents are worth $3 to $5 or so whereas large dates are worth only a few cents.

      How to tell a 1960 large date from a small date? On a small date, the tops of the “1,” “9,” and “0” all form a nearly perfect line.

      Good luck!

      Reply
    • Hi, ConservativeSenior –

      1943 steel cents (the common kind) will stick to a common magnet, whereas bronze 1943 pennies (the rare ones) will not. Good luck!

      Reply
    • Hi, Mark –

      Without seeing a picture of your 1988 Lincoln penny it is hard to say for certain, though I believe it would be post-mint damage based on the description.

      Reply
    • Hi, Doris-

      Either your coin was painted or has toned. If you’d like, you could submit a photo here to the comments section so we can get a second look-see and determine which of the two scenarios is going on.

      Reply
    • Hi Doris,

      Many coin collectors would consider the reddish-purple toning desirable on the Lincoln cent. While there is no actual value guide for coins based solely on toning, it’s safe to say your piece may be worth anywhere from about 50 cents to upwards of a few dollars, based on the buyer.

      Reply
  22. I have a 1934 Wheat penny as well as a 1936 wheat penny with a reddish hue to it… are either of these pennies worth anything?

    Reply
    • Hello, Jerrod –

      Without seeing your coins I can’t say for certain, but the “reddish”hue is likely corrosion, which is very common among these older Lincoln cents.

      Your 1934 cent, in a typical state of wear, is worth around 5 cents, and your 1936 is worth around 3 cents.

      Reply
    • Hello, Michael —

      A typical, well-worn 1944-D Lincoln cent is worth 5 to 10 cents.

      Thanks for your question!
      -Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Nathan —

      That sounds neat! Would you mind showing us a pic of the coin so we can help determine an approximate value?

      Thank you for checking with us!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Serena —

      The 1982 and 1983 pennies are worth face value if worn, 10 cents each in mint condition, and $3-5 in proof (with “S” mintmark).

      Thanks for your question!

      Reply
      • If I’m not mistaken, and I totally could be, isn’t there a double die, can’t remember reverse or obverse, on some 1983 dates?

        Reply
        • Hello, Lucas —

          That’s exactly right; it’s a reverse doubled die on some 1983 Lincoln cents. Relatively rare, they are worth around $200 to $300 in mint state grades.

          Best,
          Josh

          Reply
    • Hello, John —

      A worn 1978 Lincoln cent is worth face value, but I’d still hang onto it since it is made of nearly pure copper, which is a metal that’s becoming more valuable as the years go on.

      Reply
    • Hi, Josue —

      You have a very popular type of novelty coin that was counterstamped and distributed by a private mint during the late 1970s and early 1980s. These are worth 50 cents to $1.50 each.

      Nice find!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Amy —

      It could be a post-mint alteration, although a photo might help me confirm otherwise.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Lee!

      If you have an 1871 Indian Head cent, you have quite a coin on your hands. It’s actually considered one of the scarcer Indian Head cents in that coin series and is worth at least $50 to $80 if worn. I suggest that you don’t clean it, leave it as it is, and post a photo (if you would like) so I can tell you if it’s worth even more than $50-80 (which is probably is).

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Tyler —

      Nice piece! If it’s in mint condition (no wear) and has luster, it should be worth at least 5 to 10 cents, though possibly more if it’s a 1960 small date. On a 1960 small date cent, the top of the “9” is just above the top of “1” in the date. These can be worth $4 or more.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  23. I have a 1956 wheat penny a 1951 s wheat penny a 1958 wheat penny a 1952 D wheat penny a 1942 D wheat penny, are any of these worth anything?

    Reply
    • Hello, Mykaylie!

      Yes, the 1956 and 1958 Lincoln cents are worth 3 to 5 cents each and the others 5 to 10 cents.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  24. Hi! I have a couple of penny’s dated back from 1947-1957, however I don’t know where I’d go to sell them? I live in California.

    Reply
    • Hi, Zaina —

      What dates are your pennies? In all likelihood, if they are dated between 1947 and 1957 and are worn, they are worth between 5 and 10 cents each; the only exception would be if your coins contain any errors or varieties (such as the 1955 doubled die, which appears to show a doubled image of the date and lettering on the obverse, or “heads” side, of the coin).

      If you’re interested in selling them, you stand to make the most money by listing them on eBay.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  25. We have came across a lot of coins my mothers first husband had saved for many years.. The latest ones we can not find is a price for a 1962 penny with no mint mark.. Also do you know of a good website we can use to find the value of these coins?

    Reply
    • Hi, Chris —

      A 1962 Lincoln cent with no mintmark was made at the Philadelphia Mint and is worth 2-3 cents if worn because of its copper value.

      If you’re looking for coin values, here’s a great link to start you off: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/us-coins/

      The post has links to values of most 20th-century cents, nickels, dimes, quarters, halves, and dollars worth more than face value.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  26. I have two 1992 pennies and a 1942 wheat penny could you tell me what its worth i seen on ebay that the one i have sold for 20k to 24k the 1992 did

    Reply
    • Hi, Mista —

      I would need to see your coins to give you more precise values, but if you found those coins in pocket change, that means they’re worn. A circulated 1942 Lincoln wheat cent is worth 5 to 10 cents, while the 1992 cents, if worn, are worth face value.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  27. Hi
    I have a 1946 wheat penny and a 1979 eagle landing on the moon silver dollar I was wondering how much it is worth? And the penny might be double died I’m not sure.

    Reply
    • Hi, Daisy —

      I’ll need to please see photos of both these coins if you suspect they feature varieties/issues out of the norm. Otherwise the ordinary value of a well-worn 1946 Lincoln cent is 5 cents and a 1979 Susan B. Anthony dollar is worth face value if worn, unless it features a relatively scarce, wider-than-usual rim.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Michelle —

      Yes, your 1953-S Lincoln cent is worth 3 to 5 cents assuming it has average circulation wear.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Maura —

      Great find! The metallic composition of your 1945-S Jefferson nickel is 35% silver and worth about $1.50. All Jefferson nickels made from 1942 through 1945 that have a large “P,” “D,” or “S” mintmark over the dome of Monticello contain a 35% silver composition and are presently worth $1.50 to $3 each.

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Maria —

      Great find! The metallic composition of your 1945-S Jefferson nickel is 35% silver and worth about $1.50. All Jefferson nickels made from 1942 through 1945 that have a large “P,” “D,” or “S” mintmark over the dome of Monticello contain a 35% silver composition and are presently worth $1.50 to $3 each.

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi,

      Your best bet is to sell them either to a local coin dealer (not a jeweler or pawn shop) or on eBay. In fact, you might find the best luck selling them on eBay. The photo is a little blurry and I can’t really tell what years all of the coins are and such, but there are many coin collectors who love Indian coins — these should sell well.

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
  28. Im a Newbie. I have a ton of wierd error pennies. Like the mint is a blob (under microscope), or there are extra added imperfections like the attached photos or lots off center coins. I seem to not find errors that collectors want. Mostly aabout doubles dies, mints, or wheat. Is there a good rule of thumb for beginners when going thumbhrough these? huttps://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4de9c382b96a749645e25a21ba059fc137f9d41c21c0c73b8f7f875519f4f5bb.jpg
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/31817d5f8b342641c019cd4c2f29c5f867e9855a3f7df8340fd78de90dad481f.jpg
    Btw, you are so kind to offer assistance with your comments. Thankful I found your site!

    Reply
    • Hi, Beene —

      This is a rather heavily toned 1945 Mercury dime. It’s a nice piece worth around $2.50 to $3.

      In general, discoloration is not an error, though there are such things as off-metal errors. These are detected by both appearance and weight. You will come to learn what a coin “should” look like as you see more and more of them through research and handling. Keep doing what you’re doing — you’re keeping your eyes out for things that look unusual. That approach can eventually net you a Real McCoy error!

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Darren —

      You have a copper-based 1982 small date Lincoln cent from the Philadelphia Mint. Even though it’s circulated, its intrinsic copper value means it’w worth about two cents. Twice face value isn’t too shabby!

      Thank you for your question and photos,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Darren —

      Based on what I see on the obverse, this is a very nice 1912 Philadelphia Lincoln wheat cent with great original, chocolate brown color. You should get at least 25 to 50 cents for it.

      Awesome coin!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Holly —

      It depends how aggressively it was cleaned, but as for value unless it has a CC mintmark on the tails side it’s probably worth only about $15 now — still at least its silver value.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply

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