The Most Valuable Silver Quarters: See How Much Silver Quarters Before 1965 And Rare Silver Quarters Are Worth


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The category of “silver quarters” is quite broad and, thus, includes a number of different designs, dates of production, and values.

In fact, until 1965, all quarters produced in the United States contained silver. In 1965, the U.S. Mint was forced to switch quarter compositions over to copper-nickel clad as silver prices were rising very quickly. The value of the silver in the quarter was actually worth more than the face value of the coin.

Furthermore, people all across the country were pulling silver coins out of circulation, creating a national coin shortage.

 

Where To Find Silver Quarters

While the U.S. Mint stopped producing silver quarters for circulation in 1965, the Mint does still strike silver quarters for collectors.

In fact, the 50 State Quarters were offered in a 90% silver format, as have all issues of the 50 state quarters program.

Furthermore, the U.S. Mint has been offering silver Washington quarters for collectors since 1992.

Silver Washington quarters of the recent era (minted since 1992) are proofs, and are found in special collector’s sets that the U.S. Mint assembles and sells annually.

In 1975 and 1976, the U.S. Mint struck collector’s Bicentennial quarters with a 40% silver composition.

 

How Much Are Silver Quarters Worth?

Well, that depends on which silver quarter we are talking about.

For example, even the very first U.S. quarter the U.S. Mint struck in 1796 contained 90% silver.

Up until 1965, all United States dimes, quarter dollars and half dollars were made of 90% silver and 10% copper. The Coinage Act of 1965 changed the compositions of these coins to reduce or eliminate their silver content because the price of silver had risen above the face value of the coins. Dimes and quarters were replaced with clad coinage that was a 75% copper/25% nickel outer layer bonded to an inner core of pure copper. Source

But when most people talk about silver quarters, they’re referring to the Washington quarters Silver Series which were produced from 1932 to 1964 — these are typically the easiest silver quarters to find.

Generally speaking, common silver quarters of the 20th century in well-worn grades are worth between $5 and $10. Certain scarce dates are valued much higher than that.

 

Rare Silver Quarter Values

Here are a few of the rarest dates of 20th century silver quarters and their values:

  • 1898-Barber-Quarter.png
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    1901-S Barber Quarter:  $5,500 in Good, $17,500 in Fine, and $35,500 in Mint State 60
  • 1913-S Barber Quarter: $1,750 in Good, $4,750 in Fine, and $11,000 in Mint State 60
  • 1916 Standing Liberty Quarter: $3,600 in Good, $7,000 in Fine, and $15,000 in Mint State 60
  • 1918/7-S Standing Liberty Quarter (Overdate) $1,900 in Good, $4,000 in Fine, $20,000 in Mint-State 60
  • 1923-S Standing Liberty Quarter $390 in Good, $700 in Fine, $3,000 in Mint-State 60
  • 1932-D Washington Quarter $190 in Good, $260 in Fine, $1,600 in Mint-State 60
  • 1932-S Washington Quarter $210 in Good, $250 in Fine, $585 in Mint-State 60
  • 1934 Washington Quarter Doubled-Die Obverse $60 in Good, $135 in Fine, $950 in Mint-State 60
  • 1937 Washington Quarter Doubled-Die Obverse $130 in Good, $325 in Fine, $2,650 in Mint-State 60

With the exception of 1999-S silver proof 50 state quarters (which are worth around $40 to $50 each), all proof silver quarters minted since 1992 are worth, on average, between $5 and $8 apiece.

*Values are based on current pricing information from the Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS).

 

For More Information

To find out more about the prices of silver quarters, check out the Professional Coin Grading Service’s price guide

I would also encourage you to browse through a current copy of A Guide Book of United States Coins by R.S. Yeoman and Kenneth Bressett (Whitman Publications) to learn more about silver quarters, grading silver quarters, and to find out more about their values.

170 thoughts on “The Most Valuable Silver Quarters: See How Much Silver Quarters Before 1965 And Rare Silver Quarters Are Worth”

    • Hi, Randy —

      A copper-nickel clad quarter without its outer layer of nickel should weigh around 4.67 grams if an authentic error of this type. These types of coin errors are not particularly common and can often command $50 to $100 or more if sold to a coin collector or coin dealer who specializes in error coins.

      Reply
    • Hi Zack,

      Your 1963-D Washington quarter is worth around $3, which is the current value of the silver plus a small premium for any collectible value it has if it’s not too worn.

      Reply
  1. i have a roll on what i think are silver quarters, and a 1909 gold twenty dollar coin, are these worth anything?

    Reply
    • A 1909 $20 gold double eagle is easily worth $1300 is if it authentic, Edward. Currently, each silver quarter you have is worth about $2 to $3, depending on the average range of bullion value we have been seeing in recent months.

      Reply
      • thaks for the info. how can i be able to tell if the twenty dollar coin is authentic? i dipped it in jewelry cleaner and it came out nice and clean

        Reply
          • Hi, Edward —

            A 1909-S is still worth between $1200 and $1400 (approximately) at this time.

            It’s always best NOT to clean coins because that can actually strip away the natural color that coin collectors love. Fortunately for you, much of your coin’s value is in its gold, though it likely is worth a bit less than usual in regards to its collector value, because most cleaned coins will have a lower value than the same coin in an uncleaned state of preservation.

            As for telling if your coin is real, it’s always best to first check and see if your coin “looks” right. Are there any seams down the edge of the coin? Does the coin meet the regular weight and size specifications (33.436 grams and 34 millimeters wide)? As long as there are NO seams down the edge of your coin and the weight is about right (wear will knock a few hundreths of a gram off the weight of the coin), and the size is right, your coin has met preliminary standards for authentication. There are, however, several other specific things a trained numismatist will look for to verify a coin’s authenticity, too.

            Unfortunately, there are tens of thousands of “really good looking” counterfeit coins being made. The only way to really ever have piece of mind about a coin’s authenticity is to have a reputable third-party-grader check the coin for all known diagnostics. These services charge between $10 and $40 for most certifications.

            I have a link below I think you’ll want to check out if you’re interested in finding out more about coin grading companies (third party graders): https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

  2. Greetings !!
    Where in south florida can I find a reputable coin dealer ? I live in port st lucie florida and I have many silver quarters and I am afraid of getting short changed when I go to sell them ? any advice would be truly apprieceated .. many thanks
    michele

    Reply
  3. iv got 2 mint condition silver quarters one in 1963 and the other in 1964 iv herd there worth up to 3 dollars a piece but i have no idea where to sell them i live in akron ohio and i have no idea how to sell them

    Reply
  4. I have a 1898 Liberty quarter can you tell me what it is worth..well worn but identifiable. Also have a standing Liberty in fair condition.

    Reply
  5. I found an old box with 507 silver quarters ranging from 1936-1964. Some are in near perfect shape…others-look very worn. I read they have some substantial silver value-but Im wondering if it’s better to try and sell some individually.
    Any help would be much appreciated!

    Reply
  6. My father in law had collected in circulation silver quarter for a while. he passed away two years ago and my husband and i found them among other odd coins and fake humorous dollar bills. they range in year from 1943-1964. what are they usually worth a peice? would it be worth selling them a peice or in bulk to a silver dealer? thank you for your time.

    Reply
  7. My father in law had collected in circulation silver quarter for a while. he passed away two years ago and my husband and i found them among other odd coins and fake humorous dollar bills. they range in year from 1943-1964. what are they usually worth a peice? would it be worth selling them a peice or in bulk to a silver dealer? thank you for your time.

    Reply
  8. ok……..Im just wondering, I came across 37 silver quarters from the dates of 1936-1964, mainly in the forties. I know someone that’ll pay $3.50 a coin, but then saw on Ebay 36 of them going in a bid around $180…….what would you do? I also have one from the 1920’s with an S on it……….what to do…….?

    Reply
    • Dplace,

      Yes, that is a dilemma… The reason the coin dealer will pay you only $3.50 versus the money you may make through eBay is that coin dealers pay only around 50 to 80 percent of market value because they must pay for overhead and still acquire a profit. Selling coins on eBay puts you in a position to make an amount of money from the sale closer to what a coin dealer or merchant may make.

      However, it’s important to remember that you will incur fees selling anything on eBay. If you sold those 37 quarters for, say $200, you may end up having to spend $20 or more on listing fees, gas going to ship the coins to the buyer, etc. Plus, there’s no guarantee you’ll actually sell the coins (though I’m sure they’d sell quicly being silver).

      I think, if I were you, I’d try at least once to sell your coins on eBay AS LONG as you’re prepared to inherit the risk of perhaps not making as much as you would like to, ready to list the items, communicate with potential buyers, and then can ship the items promptly after they sell.

      As for the 1920s s-mint quarter, I’d have to know the exact date to suggest an approximate value.

      Hope this helps!

      Reply
    • Dplace,

      Yes, that is a dilemma… The reason the coin dealer will pay you only $3.50 versus the money you may make through eBay is that coin dealers pay only around 50 to 80 percent of market value because they must pay for overhead and still acquire a profit. Selling coins on eBay puts you in a position to make an amount of money from the sale closer to what a coin dealer or merchant may make.

      However, it’s important to remember that you will incur fees selling anything on eBay. If you sold those 37 quarters for, say $200, you may end up having to spend $20 or more on listing fees, gas going to ship the coins to the buyer, etc. Plus, there’s no guarantee you’ll actually sell the coins (though I’m sure they’d sell quicly being silver).

      I think, if I were you, I’d try at least once to sell your coins on eBay AS LONG as you’re prepared to inherit the risk of perhaps not making as much as you would like to, ready to list the items, communicate with potential buyers, and then can ship the items promptly after they sell.

      As for the 1920s s-mint quarter, I’d have to know the exact date to suggest an approximate value.

      Hope this helps!

      Reply
  9. ok……..Im just wondering, I came across 37 silver quarters from the dates of 1936-1964, mainly in the forties. I know someone that’ll pay $3.50 a coin, but then saw on Ebay 36 of them going in a bid around $180…….what would you do? I also have one from the 1920’s with an S on it……….what to do…….?

    Reply
  10. how to tell what my quarter is worth also how will i find the price of a 1999 conn siver quarter….and where will i find the letters of it..im looking to find out if its a pr-70.. how will i find that also..Thanks

    Reply
  11. hey Joshua I was reading about the 1942-s rare nickel with reverse of 1941 and how rare they are. I have a 1942 nickel but the reverse side is unable to read. What is the possibility that i found another one? Thanks    

    Reply
  12. i got a silver quarter with im guessing lady liberty on one side flip it over there is an eagle on it like upside down. I paid a quarter for it, ther is no date on it but seen pictures of it, there is one on here sayin the date 1925 my sister took a picture of it with her cell, how much would it be?

    Reply
    • Nice find, Carrie! Your 1925 Standing Liberty quarter is worth $6 to $8 even in well-worn grades – so you definitely got a good deal there.

      Reply
  13. idk how much this 2009 american samoa quarter is and it’s made out of pure silver and it’s bugging me out !!!! 🙁 Grrrr!!!

    Reply
    • Hi, Irish –

      Your 1937-D and 1957-D Washington quarters are common dates and, with current silver values, worth around $6 each.

      Reply
  14. i have a 2010 hot springs quarter it says platinum edition also says arkansas and has a little p on it

    Reply
    • Johnny,

      A 1908 Barber quarter is worth a minimum of around $5 to $6 given the current bullion value of silver.

      Reply
      • i have one that has lady liberty on the front and its from 1908 2 and the condition is ok what would that be worth

        Reply
  15. Hi Joshua, I know these comments have been on quarters, but I had a question on a couple other pieces. I have a 1922S dollar coin, don’t know if it is worth anything. I also have a 1943D half dollar coin. If you could help me out with your expertise, I would really appreciate it. Thanks

    Reply
  16. Hi, Pizza –

    Glad to help. Values are also based on the condition of your coins, but assuming yours are in typical, worn condition, your 1922-S Peace dollar is worth around $25 to $28 and your 1943-D Walking Liberty half dollar is valued at around $7.

    Reply
    • Thanks a lot for the quick response. I hate to bother you with more questions, but I do have one more. I have a dime. This dime is literally only a little bit bigger than the eraser on a pencil. I figured it was fake but the more I look at the, the more realistic it look. It is dated 1914D. It has everything a real coin has. I put it under the microscope and every small detail is there. Any idea on it?

      Reply
      • Pizza,

        There are some remarkably realistic coin replicas designed for doll houses and similar uses. some of these replicas actually are desired by coin collectors as novelties.

        Reply
  17. Hi , I have War World 2 Silver Quarter Set from 1942-1945(s) . I was wondering how much its worth and where i could sell it ?

    Reply
    • Hello, D –

      A base value, given prevailing silver prices as of right now would bring the total of your 1,000 silver quarters to at least $5,500. However, if you have any scarce dates, that would up the total by a significant sum.

      Please check out the dates in the article above (or check out the link here as well) for more info on the value for scarce dates: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/silver_quarters/

      Reply
    • Hi, Axel –

      Your 1926 Standing Liberty quarter is worth around $7 to $10 if it is in well worn but nice overall condition.

      Reply
  18. Hello, I have a 1965 quarter which is probably 40% silver. On base value, How much do you think it would be worth in today’s economy? Thank you – Nick

    Reply
    • Hi, Nick –

      The U.S. quarter had no silver in 1965; only halves had 40 percent silver content at that time. So, a worn 1965 quarter, which was made with the usual copper-nickel clad composition, is worth 25 cents.

      Reply
    • Hi, Emerald,

      Your 1934 and 1944 Washington quarters are each worth around $6 each, given current silver values and assuming they are in typical circulated condition.

      Reply
    • Hi, AJ!

      Each roll of circulated, common-date silver quarters ranging from the years 1936 through 1964 is currently worth around $160, so yours combined would be worth around $320. That price, is however based off the current price of silver (around $20 per ounce).

      Reply
  19. I have silver quarters as follows: 1941, 1942, (2) 1943, (3) 1944, 1945, 1950,1951,1953,1958,1960,(10) 1964. Wondering on value of set.

    Reply
    • Hello, Robin –

      The value of your silver quarters is largely dependent on prevailing silver bullion values. With silver at around $24 per ounce, which is current as of 9/8/2013, your quarters (which are all common dates) have a total value of around $140.

      Reply
    • Hi, Robbin –

      Is this a year set containing one cent, nickel, dime, quarter, and half dollar from 1929?

      If so, it would currently have a value of about $45 if all of the coins are in typical circulated grades.

      Reply
  20. People, look at what is going on in the world. When fiat currency dies and it will, real money always reverts back to Gold and Silver. This has happened many times in history so to get rid of your silver now is the most foolish thing you could ever do. Michael Maloney (a silver expert) says that silver price will surpass the price of gold. Read up on the silver shortage in the world and realize your selling at rock bottom prices today! Hold on to all the silver and gold coins you can, they are real money.

    Reply
    • Hi, Sean –

      It is rare to find old silver quarters in circulation, but they are not rare in terms of absolute number of those in existence. A 1942 Washington quarter is worth around $6.

      Reply
  21. Hi! I have a liberty $5.00 gold coin dated 1901, the back side of the coin is upside down. Was curious if you knew what the worth would be? Thank you in advance!!!!

    Reply
    • Hi, Christy –

      Your 1901 $5 gold coin has the design the same side up on both the obverse AND reverse then? Rotated dies do add value, and with a value of roughly $400 given the current gold prices, I would suggest yours is worth roughly $450 to $500 if it is a rotated die error.

      Reply
    • Hi Steve,

      That depends what type of silver dollar you have. A 1921 Morgan dollar (curly-haired Liberty on the obverse) is worth around $25 when silver values are about $20 per ounce.

      The 1921 Peace dollar, which has a Liberty head that looks much like the bust of the Statue of Liberty, is worth around $150.

      Reply
  22. Hey Joshua,
    I have a 1963 Silver American quarter in bright and uncirculated condition. Could you estimate a price for the quarter?

    Reply
    • Hello, Sean –

      A nice, lustrous 1963 Washington quarter in low to mid uncirculated grades is typically worth $8 to $11.

      Reply
    • Hi, Sharon –

      Without seeing a photo of your coin, my best guess is that you have a replica piece.

      If you would like to post an image of your coin, please feel free to do so here in the comments section!

      Thanks!

      Reply
  23. Here is my 1964 washington silver quarter. It has no mint mark, making it philadelphia I guess. What can u say about it?

    Reply
    • Hello, Christian —

      You are correct in that the lack of a mintmark means it was produced at the Philadelphia mint. 1964 marked the last year that the United States Mint produced 90% silver business-strike coins such as yours. While more than 1.2 billion Washington quarters were made in 1964, many have since been melted down and virtually all that remain are in the hands of families with estates, coin collectors, or bullion investors.

      Thanks for your question!

      Reply
    • Hello, Yolanda —

      Given the current value of silver bullion, your 1943 Washington quarter is worth around $4. ‘

      Thank you for your question!
      Josh

      Reply
  24. I have a 1885 E.PLURIBUS.UNUM silver dollar and a 1922 liberty silver dollar also a 1 onza plata pura 1986 mexico ley.999 estados unidos mexicanos coin if u can please let me know what they r worth thanks

    Reply
    • Hello, Yolanda —

      Your 1885 Morgan dollar is worth about $20 while the 1922 Peace dollar has a value of around $15. The 1986 Mexican Libertad is approximately $25.

      Thanks for checking!
      Josh

      Reply
  25. Why don’t you all collect all the coins now and pass it to your super great great children. After all, don’t you want them rich?

    Reply
    • Hello, Sarah —

      This is either a 1988-P or 1998-P (the letter “P” means it was struck at the Philadelphia mint) with a damaged third digit. It’s worth face value.

      Thanks for checking, Sarah!

      Reply
  26. Hey Josh I have a standing liberty quarter that doesn’t have a date on it but it has the m on it. Ca you tell me about it and what its worth?

    Reply
    • Hello, Stephen —

      Standing Liberty quarters made from 1916 through 1924 are often found dateless because the date on these coins were placed in a spot prone to wear. Most times, dateless Standing Liberty quarters are worth $6 to $8. However, if you have a Type I specimen (which does NOT have 3 stars under the eagle on the reverse), you might be tempted to submit it to a third-party coin grading to see if your coin MIGHT be the rare 1916 Standing Liberty quarter. This is a very slight possibility, but might be worth taking the risk on submission cost to see.

      Here’s some info on third-party coin grading firms: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

      Good luck!

      Reply
  27. I have a 1918/7 S Standing Liberty Quarter as shown in the picture, but I’m thinking that’s a counterfeit? The finish seems to look as though someone polished it with silver polish. Without weighing the coin how would I check to see if it’s fake?

    Reply
    • Hello,

      Yes, you need to be very careful with these pieces, because they are very rare. Genuine examples are worth $2,000 and up, though if yours is real and cleaned, I would suggest the value would be about half of it’s grade-dependent value. You can check to see if your coin is real by looking for a tiny die chip just above the pedestal (on the obverse) near the star just to the right of the pedestal.

      Please let me know if you have any further questions and. Best of luck!

      Reply
  28. I have 2 1943 silver dollars but one has a small mark under the head of the man ? Is one worth more than the other?

    Reply
    • Hi, Tequilla —

      As the U.S. did not strike silver dollars in 1943, it would be important to first find out what nation your coins are from. You may feel free to post photos of your coins here, too.

      Thanks!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Im sure you mean the walking liberty HALF Dollar. Hold on to them. There cool finds and silvers on the fall. It will be going up up up in a few years. Just holdm for a rainy day

      Reply
      • If your mistaken about the date and its a earlier peace dollers then we maybe talkn 20-40 bucks ea. In ither case id still putm up and hang tite

        Reply
    • Hello, David —

      Would you please post photos of the 1857 Flying Eagle cent and your 1923 silver certificate so I can determine the approximate condition of each piece and provide a more accurate estimate?

      Thanks!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Janet –

      Your 1932 quarter is worth about $4 and the 1936 and 1958 silver quarters are each worth around $3 to $3.50, assuming typical wear.

      Thanks for your question!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Savannah!

      Nice finds! They are each worth their silver value. As of today (given current silver bullion value per ounce), that would be around $35 to $37 for the entire group of 14 quarters.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Theo!

      Nice silver Washington quarter! With current silver bullion prices, it is worth about $3.50.

      Take care,
      Josh

      Reply
  29. Hello, I have been digging through old boxes at home and found pieces of coins from all over the world and now I’m planning to sell them. However, one coin I do wonder about and I think you might be able to help me. It is a quarter from 1992, nothing special about that, but is the eagle supposed to be upside down? It does not have its “up” in the same direction as the guy on the front. Just wondering if that is how it should be? Regards from Sweden

    Reply
    • Great question, Sannive —

      It’s interesting you should ask because, as you may have seen with some of the world coinage you’re going through, the “heads” side and “tails” side of coins from some nations are both facing “up” simultaneously. However, with U.S. coinage, it’s typical for the obverse and reverse designs to oppose each other. So, yes, it’s normal for George Washington on the front of the quarter to be facing up while the heraldic eagle on the back is looking down.

      As for selling your coins, you may get the best money for them by selling them as a group on eBay.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  30. Hello I have a question in reference to a 1976-S 25c silver bicentennial quarter ultra cameo Doubled Die Obverse. Do you know what the value would be if one was to be found?

    Reply
    • Hi,

      I know one was recently discovered and slabbed by NGC; the doubling was in LIBERTY and IN GOD WE TRUST. As far as I know, this piece hasn’t been auctioned or sold yet, so there is no value basis for me to go on. In all cases, value is based on demand and what the market will pay for such coins. Given that the Washington quarter series is so popular, I am sure such a piece could fetch hundreds of dollars or more, but only time will tell!

      Good luck,
      Josh

      Reply
  31. How much are 3, uncirculated, and in mint condition 1999 quarters with the states: New Jersey(1787), Delaware(1787), and Connecticut(1788) worth?

    Reply
    • Hello, Dakota —

      If they’re uncirculated, they should be worth 40 cents to $1 each, based on how pristine their conditions are.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
  32. I have about 25 standing liberty, not great condition. What would they be worth? Won’t allow me to attach picture because it’s over the limit. Not able to make out the date on any of them.

    Reply
    • Hi, Joe —

      If your Standing Liberty quarters are dateless and Type II varieties (3 stars below eagle) they’re presently worth $4 to $5 each. A dateless Type I is worth closer to $6 or $7 each. If you suspect you have a 1916 (but simply can’t tell), consider submitting it to a third-party coin grading service. Here’s more info about coin certification services: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
  33. I have acquired about 15 different silver quarters ranging from 1943 to 1964. They were heavily circulated. Are they worth anything?

    Reply
    • Hi, Scott!

      Indeed they are. Assuming them to be common dates, each is worth about $3.50 give current silver values.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Robert —

      It all depends on the years of each quarter. Silver value wise, each is worth about $4.50 to $5, but many of these quarters may be worth more as collectibles than merely for their bullion value. I suggest you check out this post to assist you in finding values for each of your coins: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/valuable-quarters/

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
  34. I’m not sure if anyone here can help me. I have two quarters from 1965 that I’m pretty sure were struck on silver planchets. I’ve done every test I could find except chemical tests; ice, bell, weight. Everything leads to them being silver. Any other ideas?

    Reply
    • Hi, Christina —

      What do your coins weigh? Would you please post a photo of those two 1965 quarters here in the comments forum? I’ll be glad to assist as best I can.

      Thank you,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Nicholas —

      As all 1776-1976 40% silver quarters struck for collectors include an “S” mintmark, if yours don’t it is either a copper-nickel clad Bicentennial quarter made by the Philadelphia Mint for circulation or some type of error. In this case, a couple clear photos of the coin and a weight of the coin (down to the hundredth of a gram) would be necessary for me to help further.

      Fingers crossed!
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hi, Mark —

      Based on the images it appears your 1993 Washington quarter has light porosity near the date and post-Mint scrapes across the words STATES OF. This piece is worth face value and safe to spend if you wish.

      Thank you for reaching out,
      Josh

      Reply

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