Presidential Dollar Proof Sets



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Presidential dollar coins have proven to be nearly as popular with coin collectors as the 50 state quarters have been since they were first released in 1999.

While many people go to their nearest bank to pick up the latest designs coming out for the Presidential dollars, there is another way to acquire beautiful examples of these medal-like legal tender coins honoring our nation’s former, deceased presidents: proof sets.

Proof sets have long been considered the best way to purchase crisp examples of U.S coins.

These sets, containing specimens with burnished, mirror-like surfaces, are often a favorite way for collectors to purchase high-quality coins straight from the U.S. Mint.

Presidential Dollar Proof Sets

When the U.S. Mint first began releasing Presidential dollars in 2007, proof sets containing the same coins being released into commerce also began appearing in the Mint’s catalog of collectibles for sale.

One advantage of purchasing Presidential dollar proof sets instead of picking the coins up from the nearest bank is that the U.S. Mint is releasing proof examples of these coins long before some are being released into circulation. In fact, the 2008 proof set, which was available for sale from the U.S. Mint in August, includes the Martin Van Buren dollar which is not slated to be struck for circulation until the middle of autumn — and it may not show up in your neck of the woods until much later.

The Presidential dollar proof sets contain the same 4 designs being minted each year for circulation.

While there is little room to judge where investment value may go for Presidential dollar proof sets, since we are only 2 years into the program, it is clear that the proof sets have a steady following. The 2007 Presidential Dollar proof sets are being sold now in the private sector for around $20, a slight markup over the $14.95 sale price the U.S. Mint charged last year in its catalog.

Beware, though, that modern proof sets have not proven to be solid performers in the investment realm. While certain sets have appreciated well over the years, such as the 1995, 1997, 1999, and 2001 proof sets, it is safe to suggest that you should consider collecting modern proof sets not necessarily for their investment potential, but rather more for the beauty of the coins contained within.

Current proof sets can be obtained from the U.S. Mint.

Joshua

I'm the Coin Editor here at TheFunTimesGuide. My love for coins began when I was 11 years old. I primarily collect and study U.S. coins produced during the 20th century. I'm a member of the American Numismatic Association (ANA) and the Numismatic Literary Guild (NLG) and have won multiple awards from the NLG for my work as a coin journalist. I'm also the editor at the Florida United Numismatists Club (FUN Topics magazine), and author of Images of America: The United States Mint in Philadelphia (a book that explores the colorful history of the Philadelphia Mint). I've contributed hundreds of articles for various coin publications including COINage, The Numismatist, Numismatic News, Coin Dealer Newsletter, Coin Values, and CoinWeek. I've authored nearly 1,000 articles here at The Fun Times Guide to Coins (many of them with over 50K shares), and I welcome your coin questions in the comments below!

5 thoughts on “Presidential Dollar Proof Sets

  1. How do you find the date on the coin? I have an almost complete set of “gold” coins with each president on it and dates of service, ending with Clinton and only a start date for him. The back has some known facts about that pres. There is nothing about the value or the year it was produced. Thanks for any help.

    1. Jon,

      The date on the Presidential $1 coins is on the edge of these pieces. As the U.S. government will not be striking any Presidential dollars with living presidents (at the time of issuance), being that you have a Clinton coin, your coins don’t belong to the Presidential dollar series.

      You must have either U.S. Mint bronze medals or perhaps some bronze or gold medals made from a private mint, especially as there is no value granted on your coins. If they’re bronze pieces, they likely have a collector value of under $5 each.

    1. Hi, Ciro —

      The best way to acquire Presidential dollar proof sets would be to buy them from eBay or an online coin dealer that ships internationally. Many online retailers are happy to send their products internationally.

      Here’s some more info on how to find a good coin dealer; the tips can be applied to researching the best online dealers, too: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/coin_dealer/

      Good luck,
      Josh

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