The Peace Dollar: See How Peace Dollar Values Have Changed Over 15 Years



This post may contain affiliate links. If you purchase through these links, we may earn a small commission at no additional cost to yourself.


The Peace dollar, a beautiful silver coin designed by Anthony De Francisci and struck from 1921 to 1935, has a dedicated following.

Its following is perhaps not quite as strong as the Morgan dollar (1878-1921) that preceded it.

The Peace dollar serenely and steadily rises in value.

 

Peace Dollar Design

Released at a time when the United States was still healing from World War I, the Peace dollar’s design beautifully evokes a sense of national pride and shining hope for a brighter future.

The obverse design brings to mind the Statue of Liberty’s head. The reverse shows a perched, majestic eagle looking ahead toward a sunrise.

 

Popularity Of The Peace Dollar

The Peace dollar is a coin that has seen steady investor activity over the years and also has popularity among coin collectors.

The Peace dollar is often collected as a series (with every date and mintmark combination sought to complete a set).

 

Peace Dollar Values In 1994 vs. In 2009

Prices for some dates of the Peace dollar have increased over the past 15 years as demand stays strong for a number of pieces — especially scarce issues.

Let’s look at the 15-year track record of some dates in the Peace dollar series.

We can see how prices have performed during the time span between the publication of the 1994 and 2009 editions of A Guide Book of United States Coins, by R.S. Yeoman and Kenneth Bressett.

  • 1921: $32 to $250 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (1994)
  • 1921: $125 to $500 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (2009)
  • 1922: $7 to $18 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (1994)
  • 1922: 17 to $30 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (2009)
  • 1923: $7 to $18 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (1994)
  • 1923: $17 to $30 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (2009)
  • 1924-S: $14 to $385 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (1994)
  • 1924-S: $30 to $550 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (2009)
  • 1925-S: $11 to $165 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (1994)
  • 1925-S: $22 to $180 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (2009)
  • 1927: $16 to $125 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (1994)
  • 1927: $30 to $165 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (2009)
  • 1927-D: $15 to $350 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (1994)
  • 1927-D: $30 to $350 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (2009)
  • 1927-S: $13 to $175 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (1994)
  • 1927-S: $30 to $375 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (2009)
  • 1928: $100 to $275 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (1994)
  • 1928: $475 to $900 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (2009)
  • 1934-S: $40 to $2,400 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (1994)
  • 1934-S: $75 to $4,500 in Very Fine to Mint-State 63 (2009)

Scarce dates of the Peace dollar like the 1921, 1928, and 1934-S have certainly performed well over the past 15 years, as indicated by A Guide Book of United States Coins.

So, too have the other dates. The price escalations for the 1922 and 1923 Peace dollar dates are more likely tied closely to rises in silver bullion value than to increasing demand and scarcity, though.

Use this guide as a reference to overall price trends for the Peace dollar, not as a guarantee that these dates will necessarily continue to rise in value. Investing in coins does have its risks, and values have fallen before.

 

More About The Peace Dollar

  • Save

Joshua

I'm the Coin Editor here at TheFunTimesGuide. My love for coins began when I was 11 years old. I primarily collect and study U.S. coins produced during the 20th century. I'm a member of the American Numismatic Association (ANA) and the Numismatic Literary Guild (NLG) and have won multiple awards from the NLG for my work as a coin journalist. I'm also the editor at the Florida United Numismatists Club (FUN Topics magazine), and author of Images of America: The United States Mint in Philadelphia (a book that explores the colorful history of the Philadelphia Mint). I've contributed hundreds of articles for various coin publications including COINage, The Numismatist, Numismatic News, Coin Dealer Newsletter, Coin Values, and CoinWeek. I've authored nearly 1,000 articles here at The Fun Times Guide to Coins (many of them with over 50K shares), and I welcome your coin questions in the comments below!

6 thoughts on “The Peace Dollar: See How Peace Dollar Values Have Changed Over 15 Years

  1. Hi, I was wondering if someone could answer a question about a coin I have. It is a 1922 silver peace dollar. I believe it was minted in Philadelphia because of no mint mark under the “one”. The thing I am wondering about is there is a large “D” imprinted in the eagles head. I am wondering if it was a misprint or if it was added by someone else. I have a picture I can e-mail if that could help.

    1. Thanks for your question, Ryan. I can tell you without seeing the coin that it’s not a mint mistake but, rather, something somebody stamped onto the eagle’s head upon their own accord.

      Unfortunately for the value of your coin (outside of sentimental value), that D in fact decreases its value somewhat, because most coin collectors will view it as an altered coin. However, it’s always going to be worth at least melt value (the silver bullion value for your coin).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recent Posts

Share via
Copy link