Silver Dollar Values: Morgan Silver Dollars And Peace Silver Dollars

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peace-silver-dollar-obverse-2.jpg Silver dollars are perhaps one of America’s most popular coins.

They often turn up in estates, are passed down from parents and grandparents.

They are usually advertised in magazines and on TV.

But what are silver dollars worth?

Silver dollars are very collectible and within reach of most coin collectors.

True Silver Dollars

You should know that most silver dollars are actually very common.

You won’t find true silver dollars (those made before 1936) at your bank anymore.

True silver dollars survive in large quantities and usually are in great condition.

It may surprise you to know that millions of silver dollars still exist, though many have been melted down over the decades.

Morgan And Peace Silver Dollars

The first silver dollars were struck in 1794. But there is a good chance the silver dollar you have and are curious about is dated from about 1878 through 1935. These silver dollars are called Morgan silver dollars (also Liberty Head silver dollars) and Peace silver dollars.

These 2 silver dollar types are the ones I will discuss here.

Morgan-Dollar-Reverse-and-Obverse.jpg

Morgan Silver Dollars

Morgan silver dollars have been popularly dubbed in honor of the coin’s designer, George T. Morgan.

The Morgan silver dollar is the kind of silver dollar you typically see advertised on TV and in magazines.

They are the ones that are often associated with romantic depictions of the Wild West and frontier life. In fact, silver dollars were well circulated in the West during the late 19th century.

Morgan Silver Dollar Values

Most Morgan silver dollars are common, especially in lower grades. These common Morgan silver dollars are usually worth between $25 to $50 in typical circulated grades.

However, there are certain dates of Morgan silver dollars that you will want to look for:

“CC” is the mintmark for Carson City, Nevada.

  • 1878-CC $100 to $390 in Good-4 thorough Mint State-63
  • 1879-CC $175 to $6,500 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1880-CC $175 to $600 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1881-CC $400 to $600 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1882-CC $100 to $235 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1883-CC $100 to $230 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1884-CC $145 to $230 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1885-CC $600 to $755 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1889-CC $475 to $43,500 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1891-CC $95 to $765 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1892-CC $220 to $1,975 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1893-$210 to $1,300 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1893-CC $250 to $5,850 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1893-S $2,900 to $210,000 in Good 4 through Mint State-63
  • 1894-$800 to $6,500 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1895-O $275 to $57,500 in Good-4 through Mint State 63
  • 1895-S $425 to $6,750 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1899 $165 to $350 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1901 Doubled Die Obverse $200 to $4,400 in Good-4 through About Uncirculated-55
  • 1903-O $400 to $490 in Good-4 through Mint State 63
  • 1903-S $90 to $6,250 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1903-S “Micro S” $200 to $17,500 in Good-4 through About Uncirculated 55

Peace Silver Dollars

Designed by Anthony de Francisci, the Peace silver dollar is a great example of the nation’s post-World War I idealism of freedom, hope, and prosperity. The “Roaring 20s” were indeed good times for the nation (until the Crash of ’29 and the Great Depression era which soon followed).

The Peace silver dollar was first coined in 1921 and last saw production in 1935.

Peace silver dollars generally are quite common. This is especially the case for Peace silver dollars minted during the mid-1920s, which usually seem to be the dates that pop up in many advertisements for Peace silver dollars.

Peace Silver Dollar Values

The 1921 Peace silver dollar (the first year of the Peace silver dollar series) was struck in a “high-relief” format. This means that the design is a little thicker — or higher up off the surface of the coin — than other years.

1921 is also an inexpensive date for Peace silver dollars. The lowest price you can expect to pay for a 1921 Peace silver dollar is $110 to $585 in Good-4 through Mint State-63 grades.

Most of the common Peace silver dollars can be had for between $20 to $50 in grades of Good all the way up to Mint State-60. However, there are a few dates which cost quite a bit more even in the lowest grades.

Here is a rundown of Peace silver dollar values:

  • 1924-S $24 to $600 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1928 $435 to $1,025 in Good-4 through Mint State-63
  • 1934-S $32 to $3,800 in Good-4 through Mint State-63

More Information On Silver Dollars

If you are interested in learning more about the prices and values of your silver dollars online, check out the articles about silver coins and articles about dollar coins found here at the Fun Times Guide to Coins, as well as these great resources:

Spare Change Ep10: Silver Peace Dollar Coin

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109 thoughts on “Silver Dollar Values: Morgan Silver Dollars And Peace Silver Dollars”

    • PJ,

      Given current silver values, each of your 1885 Morgan dollars is worth $15 to $20 in typical circulated grades.

      Reply
    • Hi, Vanessa —

      Are you curious how much your coins may be worth? I’ll be happy to provide insight if I can, but I need to know more about the types of errors you say your Peace dollars have.

      Thanks for commenting!

      Reply
  1. I would be curious to find out how to tell which silver peace dollar I have. And where I would find a mint mark. I believe I have a 1926 silver peace dollar that someone put in a machine at my work, which I then bought.

    Reply
    • Lucky find, David! You can find the mintmark (if any) on your Peace dollar under the word ‘ONE’ as in ‘ONE DOLLAR’ on the reverse of your coin (the side with the eagle).

      A 1926 Peace dollar is worth at least $18 to $20 right now.

      Reply
  2. I have a peace dollar that was sold to me in the 1980’s. I never looked at it. They came each in a plastic container in a velvet lined box where the container was in it’s own “hole”. I have a certificate of authenticity that these are uncirculated. I got them out the other day and popped them out of the velvet box. On the back side of this peace dollar, it looks like something was melted into the back of the coin…..like tape or something. I can’t really tell what it is. Is this an error from the mint?

    Reply
    • Hi, Laura —

      While I’d need to see it to offer a better opinion, my guess is that it may be some type of adhesive added later, perhaps to hold the coin in a display case.

      If you’d like, you can post a photo of your coin at The Fun Times Guide to Coins Facebook wall so I can see exactly what you’re describing. Here’s the link: https://www.facebook.com/#!/TheFunTimesGuideToCoins

      Reply
    • Hi, Laura —

      While I’d need to see it to offer a better opinion, my guess is that it may be some type of adhesive added later, perhaps to hold the coin in a display case.

      If you’d like, you can post a photo of your coin at The Fun Times Guide to Coins Facebook wall so I can see exactly what you’re describing. Here’s the link: https://www.facebook.com/#!/TheFunTimesGuideToCoins

      Reply
  3. I have a peace dollar that was sold to me in the 1980’s. I never looked at it. They came each in a plastic container in a velvet lined box where the container was in it’s own “hole”. I have a certificate of authenticity that these are uncirculated. I got them out the other day and popped them out of the velvet box. On the back side of this peace dollar, it looks like something was melted into the back of the coin…..like tape or something. I can’t really tell what it is. Is this an error from the mint?

    Reply
  4. I just watched the Video regarding the Peace Dollar…I got a little confused on the Low and High relief statements.  I have a 1935 D that has four rays under the “One”… is that a high relief coin?  I’m confused because I thought Mark stated that these were done in 1922… not later?  Did I miss something?

    Reply
  5. I have come across a few Morgan coins all in a set in a case crafted by Capital that holds the years 1878-1889. They look to be in mint condition. Also found first proof sets of uncirculated coins from the us mint dating back years. Many of them. If you could give me a clue about any of these i would appreciate it.

    Reply
  6. Hi, Missy –

    Many of the Morgan dollars from 1878 through 1889 are scarce, so we’ll need to know the actual dates of the ones you have, please.

    As for proof sets, we’ll also need to know dates/years to further advise on some rough price estimates.

    Thanks!

    Reply
  7. I have one Morgan silver dollar from 1921 and a Peace silver dollar from 1922. My late father collected coins and these two were placed in coin holders that have deteriorated with age (staples are the only thing holding the coins within the frame with some sort of cellophane covering). They appear to have been circulated, but I have no idea how long they had been circulated before my father got them. I don’t really want to sell them, so is there a value I can have them insured for? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hi, Sarah –

      Can you please describe your 1885 coin in greater detail so we could give a better idea as to value? What’s the coin’s face value? One cent?

      Thanks!

      Reply
    • Hi, Gruber –

      It’s hard to say if the 1879 Morgan dollar “copy” you own has any silver in it or not without weighing it, but I doubt that it does since a silver replica of that size would have almost as much value as the real coin, so I have to wonder why somebody would sell a an altered coin when an actual version of that same coin could be bought for just a little bit more. It may be made of nickel or aluminum. Either way, such a piece may be worth a dollar or two to a collector of novelty coins.

      Reply
  8. I have 3 1893S and would be intested to know what they are worth. They are only part of a coin collection given to me by my late Father.

    Reply
  9. If someone could help me out it would be great my friend and I found a peace 1922 silver dollar in a old trailer we were gutting it’s kinda weird… Both sides are heads and one side says copy and it says IN GOD WE VRUST yes i said Vrust… any idea what I have?

    Reply
    • Hi, Joe –

      You have a replica of a Peace Dollar; such a piece would be worth about a dollar or two as a novelty coin.

      Reply
  10. hello… I have a 1882 Morgan Silver Dollar.. I looked ok the area where you would find a mint.. I do not see anything… Why would a coin be worth today…. I also have a 1894 with mint in great condition….and a 1923 Peace Silver Dollar with mint… Can you tell me how much they would be worth… Thank you…

    Reply
  11. Hello,
    I have a 1928 peace dollar without a mint mark and in fine condition. How much is it worth and how do I go about selling it?

    Reply
  12. I have a cc coin. It is blank on one side and the other side has only the wings of an Eagle and has a dollar sign and a 1 on it. It doesn’t show any year on the coin!! Wondering if it is worth anything!!

    Reply
    • Hi, Tammy –

      I have a hunch you have either a novelty coin/token or an altered Morgan silver dollar, but I am not sure. Would you mind posting a pic of your coin here in the forums section, please? Thanks!

      Reply
  13. Hello, I am curious about three coins I have one is 1922s peace dollar with raised marks across one part. Another is 1921s Morgan dollar with one of the notches around the rim stands out more than the others and the s mark seems to be more of a blob but you can make out the s. I also have a 1979 penny with a normal front but the back is plain no markings.

    Reply
    • Hi, Loretta –

      Do you think it would be at all possible for us to see any photos of your silver dollars? They may have imperfections caused by the Mint, but it is unfortunately hard to say for certain without seeing them.

      As for the 1979 Lincoln cent, it sounds like it was altered for use as an illusionist’s coin or perhaps a gag novelty item.

      Reply
        • Hi, Loretta –

          Having looked at the great photos you posted (thank you!) it appears that, in the case of the 1921-S Morgan dollar, the denticle is more pronounced because of either a very slight die variation. This is common and probably would not help fetch any extra value on top of its usual value (which would be largely based on the prevailing silver price). The “S” mintmark appears normal for its date, though probably has a little extra “blobby” look due to the amount of wear on the coin.

          I’m looking for the raised marks across the 1922-S Peace dollar. Maybe I can’t really see them because of their size? Or, are they across Miss Liberty’s cheek and jar bone? It’s hard to say for certain, but they could be the result of a die break, which could add a few dollars to the value of the coin, on top of its silver value.

          The reverse of the 1972-D Lincoln cent appears to have been cut away to accommodate a dime. In fact, this is a very common illusionist’s trick, and is supposed to allow them to “turn” the dime into a penny (or penny into a dime) with the flick of a wrist and a little sleight of hand.

          The 1951-S Lincoln cent appears to have sustained some very unfortunate trauma to its upper obverse rim, which decreases its monetary worth to about face value.

          I hope this response answered your questions, Loretta! If you have any more, please feel free to ask any time!

          Reply
          • Awesome thank you so much! Im new to collecting and learning about coins but love it. I still think they are beautiful coins no matter if they are errors or not. I have a few more coins Id love to get your opinion on. Thank you again. I am sorry for the pictures being so big I scanned the coins and thats how they came out.

          • Hi, Loretta!

            You’re quite welcome! Always glad to help. any questions you have (or coin photos) just send our way and we’ll do our best to help!

  14. Hello:
    My name is Richard Contreraz and I have a 1891 liberty head Silver dollar in very fine condition.
    It doesn’t have a mint mark on front or back anywhere.
    And the Eagle has only seven tail feathers, and is holding three arrows in his left claw and an olive branch in his right. Is this a rare or at least semi-rare coin and what is it worth?
    You may reach me at my yah add richard.contreraz@yahoo.com..

    Thanks in advance.

    Reply
  15. Hello! I inherited alot of silver dollars that have been in a security box for 80 years or more and I’d like to know how much they are worth. I have 1 1890 morgans, 3 1920 walking liberty (half dollars), 4 1921 morgans, 3 1922 peace, 2 1923 peace, 3 1924 peace, 3 1926 Peace, 4 1927 peace, and 4 1928 Peace. I know its alot but i’m just curious.

    Reply
    • Hello, Weylin –

      Thank you for your question. Without knowing the conditions of each coin, it is hard to provide an exact value, but I can offer some conservative estimates with an assumption that your coins exhibit a typical amount of wear for their ages:

      1890 Morgan dollar: $28
      1921 Morgan dollars: $20 each
      1922 Peace dollars: $19 each
      1923 Peace dollars: $19 each
      1924 Peace dollars: $19 each
      1926 Peace dollars: $20 each
      1927 Peace dollars: $30 each
      1928 Peace dollars: $30 each (if San Francisco mintmark; $300 if Philadelphia)
      1920 Walking Liberty half dollars: $12 each

      Reply
  16. Can some one please let me know how much my coins are worth and how much I am able to get for them. I have a 1921 peace silver dollar coin and a 1923 silver dollar coin both in good condition. You can contact me via email @ camacho1312@gmail.com thank you

    Reply
  17. I have a 1885 c.c. Morgan silver dollar on the back it doesn’t say one dollar and it also says copy in between the wreath and the birds wings it says c.c. on the Bottom where it should say one dollar how much is this coin worth ?

    Reply
    • Hello, Diesel —

      Since your coin says “copy” it is a legal replica. Such a piece has little if any monetary value to most coin collectors but may be worth between $2 and $3 to collectors of novelty coins and tokens. If the coin is made from silver, its value will be whatever that specific amount of silver is worth in the bullion market (1 ounce of silver, as of this reply being written, is valued at $17.40).

      Thanks for your question,
      -Josh

      Reply
  18. Hello, 1st of all great site very helpful i have been trying to figure out my coins for sometime now and i have plenty from a wide range. If i can get some feedback on the pic i have attached for starters would be great.

    Reply
    • Hello, Gregory —

      Thank you, first of all, for your kind comments! As for your silver dollars, nice coins! I can tell you that each of the Morgan dollars in your photo are worth at least $20 each. I’d have to see both sides of each coin, though, to give a better value because it’s important for me to know the date and mintmark combinations of each coin.

      Here’s more on mintmarks: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/mint_marks_letters_on_coins/

      Please feel free to ask any other questions you may have!

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Jake —

      Would you please provide a photo of your coin so I can determine what piece you have?

      Thanks!

      Reply
  19. I found a large gray colored coin that says 1885 with a woman’s head and a little crown that says Liberty. Searching various websites I cannot find another that exactly matches. There seems to be slight variations in mine like the tendril of hair hanging looks smaller than the pictures on the internet, the ear looks different, etc. Can you tell me if it is a fake?

    Reply
    • Hello, Barbara —

      For some reason the two images you posted aren’t appearing. Would you mind reposting them please?

      Thanks!
      Josh

      Reply
        • Hello, Barbara —

          NOW the images are appearing! Thanks for your diligence in reposting them. What you have is a replica 1885 Liberty Head nickel. 1885 is a rare date for Liberty Head nickels, and therefore some people made replicas of this coin either for cash-strapped coin collectors or other reasons. While your piece isn’t a genuine 1885 Liberty Head nickel, it is still a neat type of novelty piece that’s worth around $1 or so to token collectors.

          Thanks for your question!
          Josh

          Reply
  20. Hi, Alexandra!

    Your 1922 Peace silver dollar is worth around $14, while the 1972 and 1976 dollars are worth roughly $1.25 each.

    Best,
    Josh

    Reply
      • Hi, Loukane —

        Your 1880-O Morgan silver dollar is worth $18 to $20 given current silver spot values. The coin looks nice as is — cleaning it will only reduce its value.

        Thank you for your question!
        Josh

        Reply
        • thank you for this information Joshua! Do you think it can be worth more if I have the silver dollar authenticated?

          Reply
          • Hi, Loukane —

            You could have the coin authenticated if you wish, but it wouldn’t necessarily raise the value of your coin, and it might cost you as much, or more, than the coin is worth to get it encapsulated. Generally speaking, certification fees range from about $12 to $20 or more.

            I think if I owned your coin, I would keep it as is. It’s really a nice Old Americana relic.

            Have a wonderful day,
            Josh

  21. Hi.
    I am in England and really baffled because I have a silver peace dollar exactly like the one on your web page and in about the same condition but mine does not have a date on it at all and I am certain that it is a genuine silver peace dollar but there is definitely no date on it.

    Reply
    • Hi, Gary —

      Thank you for the photos…. I don’t see any diagnostic markers in the photo to indicate that it’s a repunched mintmark of any kind, but then again a closer look in-hand never hurts, and Morgan dollars are known for their many varieties! However, as far as I can tell in the photos, this is a well-worn “S,” or so it appears based on other circulated S-mint Morgan dollars I have seen.

      Best,
      Josh

      Reply
      • Josh,

        Thank you for checking it out. I’ve looked at the mint mark with a loupe and it has definitely taken some abuse, but I just wanted to be sure that the mint mark wasn’t tampered with because this is an 1888 and even in this low grade there is a big difference in value between an ‘S’ and an “O” mint mark. Thanks again.

        Gary

        Reply
        • Hi, G.R. —

          You’re welcome… While I’m not able to provide the equivalent of an authentication service and am merely providing my opinion because I can’t view the coin in-hand, from what I can tell in the photos, you have a genuine, if well-worn, 1888-S Morgan dollar.

          Good luck!
          Josh

          Reply
  22. Hi Josh,
    I’m trying to value a coin I was given and I’m a little confused with MS figures and various other numbering/letter. It’s a 1878 Uncirculated CC Morgan Silver Dollar, looks pretty good quality, fully boxed, certified serial number, never taken out of the plastic cover. Could you advise how I value it? Many thanks in advance https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/9c17312322c116a56c86ff74fef2cb2200bcde0c51bc122a49af109539647fa1.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/5838223fa677a1054f278aeb12ad2db00cdbd203fced95bb10db5fcf8db5cc26.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/9020fa3b5f7f1a0af1deb965f9edeae3904df0e14c14e167e5277e3dd1377a0f.jpg

    Reply
    • Hello, Richard —

      You have a very nice 1878-CC Morgan dollar in its General Services Administration (GSA) holder. While the coin is worth hundreds by itself, it is actually worth more in the holder because it gives the coin provenance — it indicates this coin came from a government vault after decades of storage and was part of a massive sale that spanned from the late 1960s into the early 1980s.

      I wrote an article about GSA dollars that you might find helpful here: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/gsa_dollars/

      In the meantime, it’s good to know that values for 1878-CC GSA dollars range from about $400 to $750 or more.

      Please let me know if you have any other questions!

      Good luck,
      Josh

      Reply
    • Hello, Nel —

      I appreciate your kind comments and feedback on the articles here. Yes, coin collecting is a longtime hobby for me and I’m happy to share whatever knowledge I have with others.

      You posted a number of very nice, original Morgan and Peace silver dollars. Given what I see here, I think most of your pieces are in the $20 range, more or less. I’m thinking the value of the 1899-O Morgan dollar might be closer to melt value — about $16-17 now, due to the extensive wear. Of course, cleaning these coins only serves to LOWER their value, so definitely keep these coins original, which will ensure a higher price and better chance of sale (as most collectors like their coins in original condition.

      Overall, this is a nice array of silver dollars. Thanks for sharing them here.

      Best wishes,
      Josh

      Reply

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