Historical Values Of Buffalo Nickels: See How The Buffalo Nickel Value Has Changed Over The Years

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historic-values-Buffalo-nickelsChances are, you’ve seen a Buffalo nickel in your life, even if not in person.

From magazine advertisements to old-time movies, and even in some sayings, like “he holds a nickel so tight, the Indian rides the buffalo,” the Buffalo nickel has gained and maintained fame in a multitude of ways.

The Buffalo nickel, designed by James Earle Fraser, was minted during 1913 and 1938 and due to its span of when it was minted is highly synonymous with World War I, the Roaring ‘20s, and the Great Depression.

Interestingly, the animal on the reverse of the coin isn’t a buffalo but, in fact, an American bison named Black Diamond, who was a resident at the Bronx Zoo.

Also, the Native American depicted on the obverse isn’t a single person but a compilation of features from several, including Iron Tail (a Sioux Indian), Two Moons (a Cheyenne), and Big Tree (a Kiowa).

 

Value Of Buffalo Nickels

As for Buffalo nickels, most dates are quite common and are worth between $1 and $5.

Millions of Buffalo nickels, in fact, appear dateless due to the “high” placement of the date on the coin; the date easily wore clean off the coin after years of circulation. Dateless Buffalo nickels are worth around 25 to 50 cents.

There’s a lot of information to be gained by looking through a list of historical coin values. Investors wanting information on long-term value trends can gain tremendous insight upon looking at coin values from over the years.

The following Buffalo nickel values are from the 1965, 1985, and 2005 editions of A Guide Book of United States Coins, by R.S. Yeoman.

1913 Variety I $.85 (1965) $3 (1985) $8 (2005)
1913 D Variety I $2.25 (1965) $6 (1985) $12 (2005)
1913 S Variety I $5 (1965) $9 (1985) $35 (2005)
1913 Variety II $1.25 (1965) $3 (1985) $8 (2005)
1913 D Variety II $13 (1965) $40 (1985) $90 (2005)
1913 S Variety II $27.50 (1965) $80 (1985) $250 (2005)
1914 D $13.50 (1965) $27.50 (1985) $70 (2005)
1915 D $3.50 (1965) $6 (1985) $15 (2005)
1915 S $7 (1965) $10 (1985) $30 (2005)
1916 D $2.25 (1965) $4.50 (1985) $10 (2005)
1916 S $2 (1965) $3 (1985) $6 (2005)
1917 D $3 (1965) $4.50 (1985) $15 (2005)
1917 S $3.50 (1965) $3.50 (1985) $20 (2005)
1918/7 D  Very Good $175 (1965) $425 (1985) $1000 (2005)
1918 D $3 (1965) $4.50 (1985) $15 (2005)
1918 S $3.75 (1965) $3.50 (1985) $12 (2005)
1919 D $3.50 (1965) $4 (1985) $14 (2005)
1919 S $3.75 (1965) $2.50 (1985) $8 (2005)
1920 D $2.25 (1965) $3 (1985) $7 (2005)
1920 S $2.25 (1965) $1.75 (1985) $4 (2005)
1921 S $9 (1965) $12 (1985) $3 (2005)
1923 S $2.25 (1965) $1.50 (1985) $6 (2005)
1924 D $3 (1965) $2.25 (1985) $7 (2005)
1924 S $6 (1965) $4.50 (1985) $15 (2005)
1925 D $5.50 (1965) $3.50 (1985) $8 (2005)
1925 S $4 (1965) $2.25 (1985) $5 (2005)
1926 D $2.50 (1965) $2 (1985) $6 (2005)
1926 S $4.50 (1965) $5.50 (1985) $18 (2005)
1927 D $1 (1965) $1 (1985) $2.50 (2005)
1927 S $2.25 (1965) $1 (1985) $1.50 (2005)
1931 S $3.50 (1965) $3.50 (1985) $15 (2005)

*Unless otherwise stated, all values are for coins in Good condition.

 

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6 thoughts on “Historical Values Of Buffalo Nickels: See How The Buffalo Nickel Value Has Changed Over The Years”

    • James,

      We are so glad you enjoy The Fun Times Guide to Coins! Please keep checking back for new exciting, informative articles.

      Reply
  1. I was going through a bucket of pennies that we have had for several years. Im always looking for that special 1943 penny. well, I did find what looks like silver or white gold coated copper penny dated 1943 D penny. I cant find one online like it, they all say something a little different about the description of what I have. can you please help me. Thank you in advance for your sharing of your site, I love it and could spend hours upon hours looking at the coins and reading what you have to teach us. Thanks again!

    Reply
    • Hi, David —

      It’s hard for me to say without seeing the coin at different angles and up close whether or not there’s evidence of wear and, thus, determining if the coin is uncirculated or circulated. However, the scrape you mention isn’t showing up very well in the photo and thus I don’t believe it would be egregious enough to keep the coin from getting Mint State. Of course, some scrapes on uncirculated coins will require certification services to render a net grade, even on uncirculated coins. Usually, however, extensive contact marks and scratches on an uncirculated coin will bring the coin down to MS-60 or MS-61 — the lowest uncirculated grades to say the least, but nonetheless mint state.

      Here’s more info on certification services: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/slabbed_coins/
      And some info on grading mint state coins: https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/mint_state_coin/

      Good luck!
      Josh

      Reply
  2. Hello. I read that the 1938 D/D Buffalo was a quit common error , I wonderd if you gould a idea of what this one would be worth …Thank You

    Reply

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