New $100 Bill Shows Off State-Of-The-Art Security Features

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100-dollar-billHave you heard the news?

The United States Federal Reserve will begin issuing a brand new, high-tech $100 bill meant to deter counterfeiters.

This new $100 bill (due out February 2011) makes a huge splash in wallets and purses within weeks of its official release.

 

U.S. Paper Currency

Paper currency has been widely circulating in the United States since the 1800s.

Ever since, currency styles have changed both with social customs and with the advances in technology.

The United States government has already launched a new website to help you get acquainted with the new $100 bill.

But really, you’re probably wondering why everybody is talking about the new $100 bill.

Well, let’s just say this: the changes to the bill… they’re HUGE.

 

What’s On The New $100 Bill?

The new $100 bill promises to be a state-of-the-art glimpse at monetary technology of the 21st century.

While Ben Franklin will still be looking at us on the $100 bill, you’ll see that most other things on the bill will look significantly different.

In fact, except for the fact Ben is still on the $100 bill, virtually the entire bill is changing. All the changes are high-tech. In fact, this is really more than a simple design change the $100 bill is experiencing.

One of the first things you’re going to notice new on the bill is a blue ribbon which stretches down the face of the bill. This blue ribbon is a 3-D security ribbon. Imprinted on it are many small Liberty Bells which turn into the number 100 when tilted at various angles!

The new security ribbon is actually a separate item that is permanently attached to the bill, so it’s not simply printed on.

But that’s not all.

A strip to the left of Ben Franklin will glow pink under ultra-violet light.

The new $100 bill also will have a picture of the Liberty Bell and an inkwell on the front that will change from copper-colored to green when the bill is handled at different angles.

Oh, what’s up with the inkwell, you’re asking… Well, the many new security features aren’t the only new additions to the $100 bill.

Design Changes, Too

While Ben Franklin is still seen on the front of the bill, he is no longer bound in by that oval portrait frame border. He now has room to spread out. The new $100 bill has a full head shot of Franklin that includes his shoulders.

And, as for that inkwell? It’s the inkwell for the quill on the front of the new $100 bill seen signing the Declaration of Independence. Yep, that’s right. The Declaration of Independence is on the new $100 bill!

Let’s not forget the back of the new $100 bill — it has a redesigned picture of Independence Hall.

Are Old $100 Bills Still Legal Tender?

In case you’re wondering, any old $100 bills you may have will still be legal tender, even after the release of the new $100 bill in 2011. In fact, we’ll probably still be seeing many of the old $100 bills in circulation for years to come.

Why The $100 Bill Is Changing

By now, you’re probably curious why the $100 bill is even having to change in the first place. As things go, counterfeiters are always hard at work trying to figure out ways to pass off their own creations as real $100 bills.

The U.S. government needs to stay at least a few steps ahead of the game, and the only way to do that is to incorporate all these new features to our money. The results are really pretty cool if you think about it. These new $100 bills represent the very best technology available in currency today. With the United States $100 bill also among the most popular forms of money around the world, we can be proud that our new $100 bill will shine proudly (and securely) on an international stage!

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2 thoughts on “New $100 Bill Shows Off State-Of-The-Art Security Features”

  1. Was wondering if these 2 older notes are worth anything. 1934 D 5 Dollar Silver Certificate and 1953 Red 2 Dollar Note. I can’t find anywhere to send you my scanned images of the bills.

    Reply

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